NASCAR Sprint Cup New Hampshire

West Virginia has more NASCAR fans per capita than any other state in the nation.

Fitting, then, that The Mountain State was chosen by the Journal of Applied Social Psychology for a study on what connection, if any, exists between watching crash-filled races on television and how viewers then drive in the real world.

The study's conclusion? Five days after a televised NASCAR race, aggressive driving-related accidents in West Virginia, a state with no NASCAR tracks of its own, rose significantly, with over 23 accidents recorded versus 19 on other days, according to The Wall Street Journal, reporting on the findings.

The study, which covered years 2003 to 2006, noted that bad weather had an effect on the number of wrecks, but maintains that the 156 televised NASCAR events in that time span also correlated with an uptick in crashes.