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General Motors
has signed a contract calling for lithium-ion batteries to be supplied by A123 Systems for use in the automaker's future electric vehicles. GM says A123's advanced Nanophosphate lithium-ion batteries will power "future GM electric vehicles to be sold in select global markets." Currently, GM gets batteries for the Chevrolet Volt from LG Chem – the automaker's 2010 Corporation of the Year.

Jason Forcier, vice-president of A123, told Automotive News that the deal calls for "thousands to tens of thousands" of battery packs. Furthermore, Forcier says A123's team of engineers will have some of the GM-specific packs ready by the end of 2012 and that the first undisclosed vehicle using the A123-supplied packs will launch sometime after that. The lithium-ion units will be manufactured at A123's facility in Livonia, MI.

Forcier declined to identify the vehicles involved in the deal and wouldn't disclose whether or not they were of the electric-only or plug-in hybrid variety. However, The General's press release clearly states, "electric vehicles." But, as we should all know by now, GM's broad definition of an electric vehicle includes the plug-in hybrid Volt and even hydrogen-powered cars.

Show full PR text
GM Awards A123 Systems Contract for Future Batteries
Nanophosphate® lithium ion will power future electric vehicles


2011-08-11

DETROIT – General Motors has awarded a production contract to A123 Systems, a developer and manufacturer of advanced Nanophosphate® lithium ion batteries and systems, for batteries to be used in future GM electric vehicles to be sold in select global markets.

The contract includes advanced Nanophosphate cells and fully integrated electronic components. The specific vehicles and brands will be announced at a later date.

GM battery engineering teams have tested and validated the A123 battery chemistry at the automaker's Global Battery Systems lab in Warren, Mich. Teams from both companies will now work on developing calibrations and software controls for the battery system in preparation for production.

"GM is committed to offering a full line of electrified vehicles - each of which calls for different battery specifications," said Micky Bly, GM's executive director - Global Electrical Systems, Infotainment and Electrification. "We work with a variety of battery developers and A123's advanced Nanophosphate lithium ion technology offers ideal performance capabilities for a future electrified vehicle application."

This agreement builds on existing development contracts between GM and A123 focused on next-generation lithium ion battery technology at both the cell and system level.

"Today's announcement is the latest milestone in the partnership between GM and A123, and it showcases the type of collaboration between U.S. companies necessary to build a long-term domestic battery and electric vehicle industry," said Jason Forcier, vice president of the Automotive Solutions Group at A123 Systems.

"This is a testament to GM's continued commitment to leading the adoption of vehicle electrification technologies, and we believe that our selection as GM's supplier for this global vehicle program validates our system-level expertise in delivering fully integrated battery packs for electric vehicles."

About General Motors – General Motors (NYSE:GM, TSX: GMM), one of the world's largest automakers, traces its roots back to 1908. With its global headquarters in Detroit, GM employs 208,000 people in every major region of the world and does business in more than 120 countries. GM and its strategic partners produce cars and trucks in 30 countries, and sell and service these vehicles through the following brands: Baojun, Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Daewoo, Holden, Isuzu, Jiefang, Opel, Vauxhall, and Wuling. GM's largest national market is China, followed by the United States, Brazil, the United Kingdom, Germany, Canada, and Italy. GM's OnStar subsidiary is the industry leader in vehicle safety, security and information services. More information on the new General Motors can be found at www.gm.com.

About A123 Systems

A123 Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ: AONE) develops and manufactures advanced lithium ion batteries and battery systems for the transportation, electric grid services and commercial markets. Headquartered in Massachusetts and founded in 2001, A123 Systems' proprietary nanoscale electrode technology is built on initial developments from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. For additional information please visit www.a123systems.com.


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  • 13 Comments
      electronx16
      • 6 Months Ago
      A123, isn't that the company that charged now bankrupt Think $17K for a 22kwh batterypack? Hope GM gets a better deal.
      Spec
      • 6 Months Ago
      Congrats to A123! They really needed this. And they have great battery technology . . . they just need to get the price down. I hope GM announces a pure EV that uses some of these batteries.
        Dan Frederiksen
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Spec
        their prices are not the problem as such. their CEO said a while back it was around 400$/kWh. they could easily make it 250$ and they should but 400 is workable. their main problem is they refuse to sell their product. however bizarrely stupid that sounds, it is the truth. not only individuals but small car makers.
          krona2k
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          Yeah not selling a product you make is insane. If you don't want to provide 'support' then make it clear in the Ts and Cs that no support provided, simple.
          HVH20
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          They don't sell to small customers because of the support resources required for each project. Why waste your time and money on the small guys dream kit car when you can put the exact same amount of time and money into a production vehicle that will be repeated several thousand times? That's just stupid business practices. If you want A123 cells get them through a dealer and bring your questions to them.
          HVH20
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          Because people with doing kit cars or trying to make it as a new upcoming auto manufacturer are a dime a dozen. Unfortunately most of them have no idea what they are doing with their batteries, because its not just batteries, its the management system and controls too. Legitimate "small customers" have the staff with a proven track record and staff with the proper expertise. They still work with them because they have a lot better chance of succeeding than others with the proper human capital. I'm not saying its fair from the consumers stand point, but its how to operate a successful business when resources are limited. Why spend your time on the little fish when you can spend just as much time on the big fish. I don't like it and you don't have to either but thats reality.
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          who says support is required.. think a little. and try also to think about how a small customer becomes a big customer. have a little vision
      lxtbattery
      • 6 Months Ago
      It is a good news. http://www.lxt-group.com/02/en Lithium-ion Battery http://www.lxt-group.com/02/en Notebook Battery http://www.lxt-group.com/02/en Mobile phone Battery http://www.lxt-group.com/02/en Digital Camera Battery
      Roy_H
      • 6 Months Ago
      I suspect that the A123 battery is a good fit for the Two-Mode hybrid. I think GM will stay with LG Chem's batteries for Volt, Converje, and any pure BEV they may bring out.
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 6 Months Ago
      well that's a little interesting. since we know GM has full EV projects in the works (when I got GM to admit that, I think it was Andrew Farah) and the A123 20Ah cell is indeed a very good cell despite their deeply unintelligent marketing choices of not wanting to sell to those who want to buy them. a mass produced EV with good batteries could be interesting but the reason it's only a little interesting is that GM is invariably going to make some really bad design choices just like they did with the Volt (and Nissan did on the Leaf). it's going to be very conventional, very primitive material choices and obese unintelligent US styling. a modern intelligently engineered EV1 with A123 batteries would be fantastic. it would change the world instantly. but that's not what they are going to do of course.. everybody say like sheep
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        G'day Dan:) First, I do not allow the Created Legal Entity known as AOL to dictate terms. I do not agree. I do not consent. Due to there being no recognition of free choice. Having said that, Dan, you have your finger on the pulse mate, as to view the "votes" against you only confirms the ****** who have sold their SOLE for greed. Control is the name of the game, another corp-orate [dead talking], is occurring and continuing to brain-wash the masses. It is obvious to those who search and attempt, that technologies other than the common gutter free-mason offered obsolete rubbish, is available. Search YOUR SELF PEOPLE, be-live what you choose, it is not my concern and I shall NOT return. Wallow in your comfort zone or dare to expend. by:gymbo:)
          • 6 Months Ago
          EDIT; expend should read "explore".
      brotherkenny4
      • 6 Months Ago
      This is good news for A123. EnerDel is the company that sold the battery to Think. You may scoff at the price, but EnerDel and Think are now owned primarily by the same person, so there was probably something going on there. EnerDel makes a good battery, and will be able to sell at a much lower price. A123, EnerDel, JCS, LGChem, Dow-Kokam will all get what they can get for the batteries. Early on, early adopters will pay a premium. I do agree that it would be nice if A123 would sell to do-it-yourselfers, and small companies, but why just pick on them, no one else does it either.
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