The Toyota Prius Plug-in is coming in early 2012, and, according to AutoblogGreen tipster usbseawolf2000, here are a few interesting details:
  • Two trim levels
  • Five exterior colors
  • Deliveries tentatively scheduled for March/April 2012
November, it seems, is the month when Toyota will start taking orders for the Prius Plug-in. Come January 2012, the pluggy Priuses will start rolling down the assembly line. Not convinced? Check out this Toyota start-up date sheet posted on Donlen.com and see for yourself. As for the Prius Plug-in's MSRP, how does a ballpark figure of below $30,000 sound?


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 22 Comments
      Leather Bear
      • 3 Years Ago
      One perk with the plug-in Prius (at least for California residents) that hasn't been mentioned is eligibility for 1-person use in the HOV lanes (http://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/carpool/carpool.htm). IIRC, the Prius will be the least expensive model that will qualify for the latest HOV-use stickers (not counting the Civic GX, but that vehicle has fuel limitations of its own) My husband bought a 2nd-gen Prius in 2005 because he could use the HOV lanes to shorten travel times between job sites around the SF Bay Area. The yellow stickers previously available to owners of Civic Hybrids, Priuses, and Insights expired on 7/31/11, and he champing at the bit for the plug-in Prius to arrive so he can legally access the HOV lanes again.
      dontneedpants
      • 3 Years Ago
      I hope, and assume, they'll be available without the splashy graphics.
      NissanGTR
      • 3 Years Ago
      So why does the Volt exist again?
        Basil Exposition
        • 3 Years Ago
        @NissanGTR
        This car will not come anywhere near the electric range of the Volt. I know people don't want to hear it, but there really is a reason one is called an electric car with range extender and one is called a plug in hybrid. You want more performance and better mileage, you pay for it. For those looking to get in the game, there is the Prius plug-in. For those looking to upgrade, there is the Volt.
          nsxrules
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Basil Exposition
          The problem is that the Volt is not as efficient as GM claims (especially when running on the range extender) and costing 35%+ more for a car whose only benefit is a slightly longer EV range while giving up interior space, costing much more, etc. etc. makes it a losing proposition, which is why it's already failing in the market.
          carfan
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Basil Exposition
          you would think that all these so called "expert" idiots on autoblog would already know the difference between a hybrid and an electric car with range extender. and why there is a difference in price... I tell you the quality of these comments is going down the toilet with these morons contributing
          axiomatik
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Basil Exposition
          The Plug-In Prius does not operate like a Volt. Do not expect to be able to get in and drive gas-free for 13 miles. In fact, I doubt regular drivers will be able to drive anywhere in traffic without burning gas. Car & Driver drove one of the testers, and said: "Like a regular Prius, though, the PHV will fire up its internal-combustion engine if you’re not careful. The PHV’s threshold is slightly higher than the regular car’s, but anything more than genteel pressure on the go pedal—say, as might be required to enter the freeway or accelerate up a slight hill—and the 98-hp, 1.8-liter four-cylinder stirs with a decidedly unsexy moan." On top of that: "Even under full throttle, the PHV remains far from quick, with a 0-to-60-mph time of 11.3 seconds, according to Toyota, versus 9.8 seconds for the non-PHV model." So, the plug-in version is 1.5 seconds slower to 60 than the already slow Prius, and it is only marginally easier to stay electric-only. Good luck keeping the gas engine from firing up. This is more like Prius 2.0 than direct competitor to the Volt. The only real options for those that want to drive gas-free are the Leaf, or, if your driving profile fits it, the Volt.
        nsxrules
        • 3 Years Ago
        @NissanGTR
        This car will certainly hurt the already poor selling Volt.
          Basil Exposition
          • 3 Years Ago
          @nsxrules
          Are you really so clueless to think that sales numbers are low on the Volt because people don't want to buy them? People are lining up to buy them, but GM cannot manufacture enough right now. When was the last time you saw one sitting on a lot? It's highly popular, but production constrained fool, just like the Leaf.
          graphikzking
          • 3 Years Ago
          @nsxrules
          I don't know if it will necessarily hurt the volt sales. It may bring more exposure to the plug in market? Will the plug in prius have the same setup as the volt? Up to xxx miles on electric then gas engine will primarily only (for the most part) charge the car? If so my wife would be perfect with this car. I just installed a 240 line in our garage and already have solar panels on the wall so my garage is ready to go!!! It would be ideal if she could get like 30 miles on a charge because then she'd never use gas to go to/from work all week.
          Julius
          • 3 Years Ago
          @nsxrules
          To answer graphikzking: From ABG's own post on the PHEV Prius: "The newest PHEV Priuses have a maximum all-electric range of around 13-14 miles"
          graphikzking
          • 3 Years Ago
          @nsxrules
          damn autoblog and no editing comments! - I have solar panels on the roof. Not the wall.
      Hazdaz
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is what happens when you have over a DECADE of hybrid/EV engineering know-how under your belt. They have licensed their Synergy technology, they have sold over a million hybrids and because of that they are able to amortize the cost of this technology over many, many, many more vehicles than anyone else. Because of that, they are able to bring out this EV Prius for less than anyone else and while other companies might be just starting to get into hybrids or EVs, Toyota is already on their THIRD generation of this technology. While I find their cars to be incredibly boring, I give Toyota big props for their long-term thinking and their willingness to enter a segment that didn't even exist and no one else (except Honda) was even considering. GM and Nissan better get their asses in gear because they will probably get their asses handed to them when this EV Prius finally ships.
      • 3 Years Ago
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        • 3 Years Ago
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      mylz
      • 3 Years Ago
      Doesnt this still use the nickel battery or did they switch to the lithium... remember when toyota said there was no future in lithium batteries... look whose laughing now. and if im not mistaken it only goes 13 miles on a charge, now thats just pathetic... and for the beating out the Volt, ha keep dreaming. only ******* buy prius's
      TJ Wenger
      • 3 Years Ago
      Ok, this isn't specifically related to the Plugin, But am I the only one completely lost on the prius design language? I'm not even hating the car for what it is. I'm hating it because NONE of the design lines make visual sense to me. Mostly because they're are just so many. Honestly, to me it always look like someone over inflated a previous generation civic. I just can't stand looking at this car. Sorry, I had to see if I was alone on this. I've never really spoken out against the Prius because the concept is great, its just been really ugly to me. And its hard for me to want an ugly car, no matter how efficient it is.
        4 String
        • 3 Years Ago
        @TJ Wenger
        The design language is decent/sharp, and the overall design is focused on practicality. Relatively lightweight, with the batteries in the floor, and plenty of room inside and in all the seats for 6 footers. It may not suit your kiddy likings (what is good design to you? a huge wing and side skirts?), but it is extremely usable in day to day living.
        FeMan
        • 3 Years Ago
        @TJ Wenger
        ^You ain't down with the future!
      • 3 Years Ago
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