Toyota Prius Plug-in – Click above for high-res image gallery

The Toyota Prius Plug-in is coming in early 2012 and, thanks to AutoblogGreen tipster usbseawolf2000, we've got some exclusive details:
  • Two trim levels
  • Five exterior colors
  • Additional accessories/options available
  • Deliveries tentatively scheduled for March/April 2012
November, it seems, is the month when Toyota will start taking orders for the Prius Plug-in and, come January 2012, the pluggy Priuses will start rolling down the assembly line. Not convinced? Check out this Toyota start-up date sheet posted on Donlen.com and see for yourself. What's the Prius Plug-in's MSRP? How does a ballpark figure of below $30,000 sound?


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 16 Comments
      usbseawolf2000
      • 3 Years Ago
      Eric, the link to PriusChat is broken. It is missing colon after the http.
        ABG Sebastian
        • 3 Years Ago
        @usbseawolf2000
        Thanks. We're dealing with a new back-end system, and it's messing some things up (like adding extra http stuff). Should be fixed now.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @usbseawolf2000
        Indeed... it has one too many (http://http//).
      Spec
      • 3 Years Ago
      So is this car really any better than the plug-in conversions that hobbyists have been doing to Prius cars for years? Seems to be pretty much the same.
        usbseawolf2000
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        The big one is 10 years / 150k miles PHV battery pack warranty. The conversions are good for about 3 years. Of course, it will be crash tested and EPA already gave it EAT-PZEV emission rating. That means HOV lane access (unlike the conversions) in California. Prius PHV's EV experience is also stronger than the cordless version. There is no more 27kW limit from the NiMh battery to feed the 60 kW motor (MG2). The Lithium PHV pack is more powerful and the prototype's EV (default) mode driving experience is much stronger. MG2 should also be water-cooled like the bigger Prius v (wagon) to handle the extra power. Keep in mind Leaf's motor is 80kW. PHV's exhaust emission (see link#1) is slightly more (still well below the threshold) and the evaporative emission is better than the cordless version. See Link #2 for a comparison of Prius PHV and Volt's emission. Link #1: http://priuschat.com/forums/gen-iii-2010-prius-main-forum/64518-emission-comparison-prius-hs250h-insight-civic-hybrid-jetta-gas-tdi-wrx-sti-5.html#post1199969 Link #2: http://priuschat.com/forums/gen-iii-2010-prius-main-forum/64518-emission-comparison-prius-hs250h-insight-civic-hybrid-jetta-gas-tdi-wrx-sti-5.html#post1199560
      • 3 Years Ago
      I wonder if they're transitioning towards series-type full hybrid now that others have joined them in the parallel and combined hybrids. It would be hard to imagine that Toyota's engineers couldn't make it even more efficient besides adding the plug-in and higher capacity battery.
        skierpage
        • 3 Years Ago
        Why transition to series hybrid? Nobody has come up with a better way to blend engine and motor than the e-CVT in Toyota's Hybrid Synergy Drive. Besides the explicit licensees and customers, Ford's system is the same, and GM's Voltec is very close (and made in Japan, hmmm). The only reason to transition is if there's some fundamental problem, e.g. it can't go over 62 mph in electric-only mode.
        paulwesterberg
        • 3 Years Ago
        This car will return excellent mileage for most people, short/long trips in city/highway driving. The HSD transmission already allows the motor to operate at steady low rpms. A serial hybrid would have worse efficiency because it would have additional conversions of energy: gas->motion->generator->electric->eletricmotor->motion. To further improve efficiency they should boost the battery pack and sell a pure electric version with more range for commuting.
          Peter
          • 3 Years Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          a bigger pack (and its weight that you have to drag around) will improve efficiency how?
          Peter
          • 3 Years Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          Ah so you are talking gasoline efficiency. Sure chuck the ICE, give us a real electric motor with a top speed above 62mph, and a real battery pack. However if your electrons come from coal and you are talking C02 emmissions per mile it depends on the usage cycle. For an efficient ICE (kudo to Toyota) the current weight in the battery which is less than the competition makes some sense as its usage data for the demonstration prototypes shows that most trips are in that under 12 mile range. Increase the battery and it will help that proportion of EV miles (and C02) for trips over 12 miles but it will take more kW/mile and l/100Km due to the additional weight, and cost more.
      Spec
      • 3 Years Ago
      A bigger battery pack will give you more electric miles and less gas miles and thus improve efficiency. Pretty simple really.
      harlanx6
      • 3 Years Ago
      It's a little pricey, but it is a real car, and you can't argue with 10 years of dependable success. This should cut into the "Leaf and Volt" market share. You can have the best of both worlds. An EV for close commutes, and a versatile car for everything else. It's a no brainer.
        Marco Polo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        This vehicle will expand the market. It will be purchased by those who find the Leaf too radical, and Volt too expensive. Toyota's reputation will also win over the hesitant.
      Rotation
      • 3 Years Ago
      Below $30K doesn't sound all that good if it's for the same model that sells non-plugin for $24K.
        Dave R
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Rotation
        Yeah, $6k more for 5.2 kWh of battery doesn't sound all that great. I believe the stock battery is 1.3 kWh in capacity, so you're paying well over $1000 / kWh to be able to plug in. Sure there are additional costs in getting the Prius to plug-in even at an OEM level, but it does sound expensive.
        usbseawolf2000
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Rotation
        Don't forget the $3k tax credit. Rumors said it is $3k to $5k more than a comparable cordless model.
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