2011 Ford Edge Ecoboost

Is 30 the new 20? It is when it comes to highway mileage for crossover vehicles. Though the official ratings are not yet on the FuelEconomy.gov website, FordInsideNews is reporting that the pairing of the Ford Edge with the turbocharged Ecoboost 2.0 liter engine will be good for 21 miles per gallon in the city and 30 mpg highway, with a combined rating around 24. This is a 10 percent improvement over the normally aspirated V-6 version. That puts it squarely in the range predicted when we took a quick spin in an Ecoboost-powered Edge last January.

The new engine is expected to produce 230hp, which should be enough to move two tons of CUV with some alacrity. Pricing, availability, and other details are still upcoming.

[Source: Green Car Reports | Photo: Jeff Glucker/AOL]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 38 Comments
      Marco Polo
      • 3 Years Ago
      @David. Thank you. I have been asking the anti-fracking advocates for the rationale behind their beliefs for some time, but to no avail. The documentary 'Gasland' remains a popular source for disseminating this latest conspiracy theory. The latest technology permits the disposal of hazardous waste to be safely processed and disposed of with relative ease. The fracking process is very safe, and accidents close to the surface are a very remote possibility. Very often, gas wells are drilled in areas where gaseous water tables have naturally existed for eons. Omly when the NG company moves into the area, this perfectly natural phenomena becomes a source of publicity and compensation claims.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Natural gas is a fast growing source of power for electricity generation so the oil companies would not be bereft of markets if a lot of transport were electric. I find these conspiracy theories weird when the technology that is approaching maturity for moving cars long distances without very heavy batteries or long refuelling is hydrogen fuel cells. The least hypothesis is that is why the car companies are interested. It is certainly why I am interested in the technology, rather than a concern for oil company investments.
      Marco Polo
      • 3 Years Ago
      @Spec, I think David really meant that here is nothing sinister about energy companies investing in Hydrogen research. His reply was based on the proposition by 2WM that the oil companies wanted to suppress EV's by developing hydrogen technology. Taken in that context, it becomes a conspiracy theory.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Here is one of the oilmen I was talking about: 'Contamination should be a concern. But let me refocus your thoughts. Frac'ing a deeply buried shale gas reservoir won't endanger surface waters IF NOTHING GOES WRONG. There's virtully no chance of those nasty chemicals perculating up to the fresh waters. Now, what can go wrong? The pump pressures used are very high and can rupture the steel casing that's used to protect the fresh waters. In Texas this is monitored and heavily fined if it occurs. Accidents still happens but companies do all they can to avoid such a situation if for no other reason then their own financial position. The bigger risk IMHO is the disposal of produced frac waters. But this is the same problem these local folks have with the disoposal of all hazardous materials. I have no doubt that the volume of frac fluids for disposal is very small compared to how much other nasty stuff local industries generate. Again, up to the regulators to the keep this from being a problem. Again, I'll use Texas as an example. Hazardous fluid disposal here is very closely monitored. But accidents still happen. But, again, the penalty structure pushes companies to make a serious effort to avoid the problems. Bottom line: frac fluids shouldn't represent a significant risk AS LONG AS THE REGULATORS DO THEIR JOBS. I get the impression that this has been the big problem. The local regulators have had to deal with such issues for other industries so I'm a little confused why this appears to a problem. No doubt there are many millions of gallons of nasty chemicals besides frac waters being disposed of in these states. The only new twist would be the well bore operations themselves. But again, enforced regulations should handle most of the risks.' http://www.theoildrum.com/node/6258#comment-594601 And a fuller discussion of the technology: http://www.theoildrum.com/node/6346 It looks to me as though it would be pretty difficult to get the fracking fluids back up through the rock to the level of the groundwater. The problem is that they have been dumping the waste above ground. Something else to be grateful to the regulators for.
      Robert Sheehan
      • 3 Years Ago
      So what? The Subaru Outback gets 29 MPG (22 City) with All-wheel drive and 9 inches of ground clearance, which decreases fuel economy. And you've got proven off-road and all-weather ability (read Angus Mackenzie's Motor Trend article about a thousands-mile trek through the Aussie Outback), in contrast to the city-slicker Venza, Edge, Highlander, Murano, etc. Anyway, who wants a big, lumbering SUV with only FWD? If you want 30 MPG in a crossover, you need a hybrid SUV--or the Outback.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Spec: I was referring to the notion that some all-powerful group of illuminati determine the outcome regardless of the technological pros and cons. Of course oil companies 'conspire' to ensure future sales of their product. That is pretty well their job. Other interests however are vigorously conspiring with other objectives in mind.
      Smith Jim
      • 3 Years Ago
      Some people will take this example of the 30 MPG Ford Edge as proof the automakers have not been trying hard enough in the past. I say this new Ford Edge is proof that consumers are mostly to blame. Why would anyone choose to buy a vehicle that gets 30 MPG on the highway when they can purchase a mid size sedan like the Prius that gets a combined city/highway 50 MPG? The answer is that too many people believe SUVs or CUVs are some kind of status symbol. I'm as guilty as anyone else. In 2000 I bought a full size conversion van with a 5.7 liter V8.
        Paul P.
        • 4 Days Ago
        @Smith Jim
        I don't necessarily see people buying CUVs only as a status symbol. A lot of people simply like driving them better than cars. As an example, my wife, who has had multiple knee surgeries, finds getting in and out of CUVs much easier than typical mid-size cars. Especially when parking next to curbs. She also likes that the rear cargo door keeps the rain off her head when loading the trunk.
          Smith Jim
          • 4 Days Ago
          @Paul P.
          I must have been grouchy this morning. What I should have said is the Ford Ecoboost engines are cool technology.
        Robert Sheehan
        • 4 Days Ago
        @Smith Jim
        You're totally right, Smith Jim. I have two friends who bought big, lumbering SUVs for their budding families--even though a minivan or, better yet, a mini-minivan or wagon, would have been better for the little kids or their budget. They want the status--period. For instance, the upcoming Prius V seems like a no-brainer for families, with its cavernous cargo bay and 42 MPG. Killing two birds with one stone. But unless they jack it up to look like an SUV, who's gonna buy it?
        • 4 Days Ago
        @Smith Jim
        "The answer is that too many people believe SUVs or CUVs are some kind of status symbol." There is that, but have you tried to find a decent station wagon in the US lately? The CUV is the station wagon, just excessively tall and with better marketing. Personally, I prefer the looks of actual station wagons. But it appears that I'm in a very small minority...
      Spec
      • 3 Years Ago
      I still shake my head at the fights the auto-makers kept having when raising the CAFE standards in the past. See . . . was it that hard to reach these targets? Those idiot auto-makers thought the oil companies were there friends. Nope . . . in 2007 the oil companies were the most profitable companies on the planet while the automakers went bankrupt. It seems the auto-makers have learned a little bit.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        Who do you think is funding the hydrogen research? There is definite payola from the oil corps. Think about this; auto companies are hesitant to make electrics, even when there are proven batteries and plugs everywhere. But they somehow have billions of dollars to spend decades developing something with no infrastructure, that is expensive, and has a lot of problems to solve. The oil industry is interested in hydrogen because they are trying to find a way to use their biggest cash cow byproduct: natural gas.
        Smith Jim
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        Most of the blame for poor fuel economy lies with consumers. In 2000 Honda introduced the first hybrid in the US. Sales were slow for the first generation Honda Insight. The first gen Insight was cancelled in 2006 due to slow sales. Meanwhile, everyone and their brother were buy huge SUVs. Then fuel prices skyrocketed and people changed their car buying habits. Fuel prices gradually came down after the economic meltdown of 2008 and even though car sales were low the proportion of gas hogs purchased went up. Late last year fuel prices started climbing again and people started buying fuel sippers. We, the consumers, are the biggest part of the problem.
          2 Wheeled Menace
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Smith Jim
          ^---David; Most of the people i know driving SUVs are in their 20's-40's.
          Spec
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Smith Jim
          True . . . but the automakers could still have met stricter CAFE standards and still provided the cars people wanted (as they are doing right now). They were just whining because it would cost a little more and require a little research & development.
          Actionable Mango
          • 4 Days Ago
          @Smith Jim
          Consumers were dumb for not buying the Honda Insight? NO automatic version, meaning many potential customers can't drive it. NO air conditioning, another feature most people want. UGLIEST car ever made. 2-person capacity. Front seats cramped - two adults will constantly bump elbows. Harsh ride and poor handling.
          Dave R
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Smith Jim
          @miles - Gram should be driving a station wagon or a mini-van instead of an gas guzzling Explorer. Your wife should also be driving a minivan. If still not big enough - rent the Expedition for when you actually need to go on one. The gas savings would pay for the rental easily unless you're doing it every weekend. When I was a kid we drove around the country in a sedan or minivan for our camping trips. People think they need these monstrous vehicles and justify them by actually using them once a year - when they should be buying a car for 98% of their actual needs - not perceived.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Smith Jim
          If you need something that can move a lot of stuff and people, I can't see why folk should not choose something that looks cool instead of like a converted van, nor any reason it's fuel economy should be much worse than them. I can't share the obsession of some here with fuel economy as the be-all and end-all. Moving from petrol to electric is the big saver, and we need to generate electricity in a sensible and low carbon way anyway, which means nuclear and in some regions solar if the costs can be reduced. Neither of those sources would have problems providing power if the average car did 2 miles/kwh rather than 4.
          EVSUPERHERO
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Smith Jim
          It is every citizens god given right to send more money out of the country for oil, have our taxes go to spend billions securing oil and make the oil corps lobby richer and our enemies, ensure that thousands more us soldiers die in oil wars and send tons of green house gases into the air. Why should anyone bother with what their neighbor drives? Has everyone gone nuts? Why should any of you care if I burn tires in my yard everyday? Why should any of you care if your neighbor is helping to ruin this country. We should probably over look wife and child abuse as well, repeal the laws, the problems will solve themselves with out anyone lifting a finger.
          miles
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Smith Jim
          Marco, a tote is just a plastic basket with a lid, you can stack them from the floor to as high as you can reach. She needs to stack them 3-high in her vehicle, and she can do it (barely) in the explorer. Isn't the explorer just a tall wagon? There really aren't any large wagons available for a reasonable price in the US. I don't think the US domestics make any, I know the Asians don't make any large ones, and the big Eu wagons (at least the ones available in the US) are not exactly affordable. EVSuper, I largely agree with your rant here. While I'm not completely sold on the co2 angle, the economic, nat. security, other pollutants are surely valid reasons for concern. That's why I spent a decade in my 1-liter Metro. Unfortunately I'm not in a position to have multiple cars beyond what my family currently has to avoid driving too much vehicle sometimes. I'm just tired of all the instant judgments I see here on this site from those that only have a glance of someone's life - like seeing too many SUV's at the elementary school. I see lots of big vehicles picking up the kids, and of those people that I know personally, almost all have quite valid uses for them - they are not bought as status symbols around here.
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Smith Jim
          Miles all the things you claim as advantages for SUV's could just as easily be perform by the less cool, but equally functional, station waggon, or better by people movers. The SUV configuration was designed primarily as a 4 wheel drive vehicle, with of road capacity. Thats the image that's motivated the fashion for these vehicles and created a boom in suburban drivers, driving inherently unsuitable, wasteful vehicles. Not utility, or safety, but fashion.
          miles
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Smith Jim
          I disagree DaveR, but thanks for proving my point by insisting you know better. You can't triple-stack the totes in a station wagon. Getting gramps to dialysis even in a few inches of snow is more important than making sure folks like yourself are approving or her vehicle choices. As far as renting to cover the capabilities of our Suburban, we would need to rent about 15 or 20 times a year or more, and it's just not as practical as you seem to think. If that's ok with you. Marco, I've been reading your posts for a long time now and I respect your opinion, but what large AWD wagons available in the US are you talking about? Gram is going to stick with Ford because that company put dinner on the table her whole life, but even without such brand loyalty, what big wagons are out there nowadays?
          Marco Polo
          • 4 Days Ago
          @Smith Jim
          Miles, thanks for enlightening me on a 'Tote', they sound like a useful innovation. Yes, An explorer is just that, a higher, imitation 4WD, with less space that a s/waggon. Toyota, VW, Mazda, Hyundai and lots of manufacturers produced people movers, with vast carrying capacity based on Vans. These fell out of fashion, not because they lacked practicality, safety, functionality, load capacity, or even cost, but rather they lacked the 'image' of SUV's. We have converted 38 of these vehicles to EV for resort hire, and while profitable, small 4WD configuration EV conversions are more popular. My LEVRR, is basically for rural use, and even though it takes up no more room than a large car, its height and 4WD capacity make it a wasteful car for city use. Unlike EV superhero, I believe we (especially the government) should interfere in our fellow citizens lives as little as possible. Zealous environmentalists are always in danger of becoming the new Puritans. Intolerant of other folks lifestyles, and determined to root out any opposition to their own self-righteous philosophies.
          miles
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Smith Jim
          Some folks on this site need to lighten up on other peoples vehicle choices. Most of the people I know that drive SUVs use them for things like camping and pulling trailers or hauling their 3 or 4 kids around. Gram has one because she's selling at every craft show in the county. No doubt some of you folks call her an idiot when you see her drive her new explorer to the grocery store alone for a loaf of bread. Just because someone has too much capacity when you see them driving one alone at that moment doesn't mean they don't need an SUV. How about when my wife goes somewhere alone in her Suburban? She must be an idiot! Not really. Last weekend I had that Suburban packed with 7 boy scouts and all their gear on a camping trip out to the mountains of Pennsylvania, how many Prii Would that take? 2 for the people, but that would need 2 drivers, and we only had me. Then 1 or 2 more for their gear. See what I mean? I understand it sometimes seems like some are compensating with vehicle size, but to think that when you see someone alone on the road with a big vehicle gives you enough information to pass judgement, no. I think you have some more growing up to do.
          Smith Jim
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Smith Jim
          The fact that SUVs, with their high center of mass and parachute-like aerodynamics were ever popular shows that most consumers are just plain stupid.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Smith Jim
          It could also prove that the population is ageing, as it is a lot easier to get in and out of a higher vehicle.
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Smith Jim
          Miles, I not sure what "triple stacking totes" is, must be an American thing? I not sure if the Volvo, Audi, Chrysler, Peugeot, etc, AWD station waggons, are available where you live. However, I think you miss my point. If you have a genuine use for a Large SUV, then you should purchase one. It sounds like you get a lot of legitimate use from your SUV 4WD. My complaint was really intended for those All terrain look-alike SUV's, mostly 2WD, and/or posses no real all terrain capacity. Take a look at any school recess, see the suburban Mothers picking up children in enormous SUV's, that never leave the suburbs. Look at the 'would be macho' young males, (and older males) driving SUV's that will never leave the blacktop. It seems the SUV has virtually replaced the older, 'uncool' station waggon, not for any practical value, but as a fashion image. Don't get me wrong, SUV's have a legitimate market, but see for yourself how many could be replaced by people movers or Station Waggons. But, you are right! We shouldn't be too hasty to rush to judgement! How people spend their money is their business. I really shouldn't try to restrict my fellow citizen, from enjoying the vehicle of his choice. It's just my pet peeve, at seeing such a ridiculous fashion. Still, fashions change. When I wore my hair long in the sixties, many people thought I was ridiculous. (Mostly people with very little hair to grow!). Maybe the SUV fashion will also disappear, especially as tyres become more expensive and congestion taxes start to bite.
          • 4 Days Ago
          @Smith Jim
          Previous fashion when I was a young man involved buying cars which were as low to the ground as possible, could exceed the speed limit as many times over, and grounded out on the slightest bump whilst providing as little space inside as possible and virtually no luggage space. I believe they were called Lamborgini's, Masserati's and so on. Oh, and as an added bonus they continually broke down. In comparison I find the present fashion for SUV's the height of practicality, certainly way more so than the various extreme 'fuel economy' cars which sacrifice accomodation, speed and comfort to maximise one criteria - Aptera, I am looking at you!
      John Lucas
      • 3 Years Ago
      Isn't the Edge in the same class as the Equinox? The Equinox get's 32 MPG. I don't see this displacing the Chevy Equinox as the class leader.
      • 3 Years Ago
      I chose to read this article since I thought the vehicle was a pretty smooth looking machine. Being from Australia I have only recently figured out that 30mpg in the US is a bit better than 30mpg here. I am not familiar with the car but it looks rather large. I'm all for saving the world from too much CO2 and also support the idea of suggesting ways or informing people to protect them from their own stupidity. But when I see people become a bit too concerned with what anyone else is doing it reminds me of this tragic story. http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/its-unbelievable/2007/10/31/1193618975569.html Maybe it doesn't need saying but please consider it.
        Marco Polo
        • 4 Days Ago
        "30mpg in the US is a bit better than 30mpg here". How do you figure that? Australia has been metric for over 30 years ! (the old imperial gallon was 18% more than the US gallon).
      Paul P.
      • 3 Years Ago
      30mpg is great. However, that's only for the FWD model. If you want AWD you still have to buy the model with the 3.5L V6, which gets 18 city/25 highway. As someone that lives up north, I don't think I've ever seen anyone purposely buy a FWD only CUV. They all want AWD for winter.
        Smith Jim
        • 4 Days Ago
        @Paul P.
        I'll bet the FWD comes standard with traction control. Most FWD cars have TC standard these days. If FWD with traction control isn't enough traction you could put on snow tires in the winter.
      Spec
      • 3 Years Ago
      @David It is not a 'conspiracy theory' that energy companies have supported hydrogen. There is a long documented history of their financial and political support. Especially with regard to the the California Air Resources Board where they give people jobs, fund projects, build H2 stations, etc. http://www.fuelcellpartnership.org/about-us/members2
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