Honda has announced a voluntary recall on 2.26 million vehicles around the world, 1.5 million of which reside in the United States. This recall concerns the automatic transmission software of the 2005-2010 Accord (four-cylinder), 2007-2010 CR-V and 2005-2008 Element, where the transmission's secondary shaft can be damaged if quick shifts are made between Reverse, Neutral and Drive (as a driver might do when trying to rock free a stuck vehicle from snow or mud).

The automaker states that, in this scenario, a secondary shaft can be damaged and a bearing can break, causing the engine to stall or lead to difficulty with putting the vehicle in Park. Honda's remedy includes an update to the transmission's control module software, easing the transition between gears to reduce the possibility of damage.

Honda has confirmed that no injuries or deaths have been reported because of the gearbox malady. Owners will be able to take their cars to dealers and have the recall work done free of charge, and Honda will begin its owner notification process starting on August 31. Follow the jump for the automaker's official release.
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Statement by American Honda Regarding Automatic Transmission Control Module Software Recall: 2005-2010 Accord, 2007-2010 CR-V and 2005-2008 Element

Honda will voluntarily recall approximately 1.5 million vehicles in the U.S. to update the software that controls the automatic transmission. Certain 2005-2010 4-cylinder Accord, 2007-2010 CR-V and 2005-2008 Element vehicles will be included in the voluntary recall. Without the updated software, the automatic transmission secondary shaft bearing in the affected vehicles can be damaged if the transmission is quickly shifted between each of the reverse, neutral and drive positions, as may be done in an attempt to dislodge a vehicle stuck in mud or snow. If the bearing is damaged in this unusual scenario, it can cause the engine to stall or lead to difficulty engaging the parking gear. The update to the vehicle's automatic transmission control module software will ease the transition between gears to reduce the possibility of damage. No injuries or deaths have been reported related to this condition.

Honda is announcing this recall to encourage all owners of affected vehicles to take their vehicles to an authorized dealer as soon as they receive notification of this recall from Honda. Notification to customers will begin on August 31, 2011.

When Honda identifies concerns of this nature, nothing is more important to the company than fulfilling our obligation and responsibility to alert our customers. To this end, in addition to contacting customers by mail, after August 31, owners of these vehicles will be able to determine if their vehicles require repair by going on-line to www.recalls.honda.com or by calling (800) 999-1009, and selecting option 4.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 46 Comments
      Robert Sheehan
      • 3 Years Ago
      In defense of Ford, though, it's hard to issue a recall when you know the media will be all over it. Read Ed Wallace's Businessweek analysis of last year's Toyota issues, where he says the media owes Toyota an apology. Or read Car and Driver's final analysis of the same issue. In light of the fact that the NHTSA could peg almost none of the acceleration complaints to mechanical failure, and that both the NHTSA and NASA found no electronic or throttle drive issues, it's clear that perceptions of safety and quality issues for Toyota--or for any automaker--are way overblown. The key is that when evidence mounted on the side of Toyota, the media hardly batted an eye. Now, this is what automakers are up against. How can the truth come out when all the media cares about is creating a sensation for ratings and aggrandizing the careers of nontalented media personalities??
      MonroeSS
      • 3 Years Ago
      http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-08-05/gm-tops-toyota-as-largest-automaker-on-japan-quake.html
      r67bennett
      • 3 Years Ago
      HONDAS transmission is total GARBAGE believe me. I went through ( 3 ) yes three tranny on my Acura TL in a year....it seems that honda couldnt figure out why their tranny keeps blowing up.
        airchompers
        • 3 Years Ago
        @r67bennett
        Honda automatic transmissions have had their problems. But they redesigned the transmission in February, 2004 and the transmissions have since proven to be as good as any other automatic transmission. Now, Honda's manual transmissions are above reproach. And don't get me started on the third gear issues, there was a small issue on the synchro but a good driver would have never encountered it. Rather it's a bunch of idiots slamming the car into gear after bouncing it off the rev limiter or shifting without the clutch - poorly.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        dukeisduke
        • 3 Years Ago
        No, "rocking" has always been a normal method for getting unstuck. The owner's manuals usually mention something about it, and in cars with traction control, you're told to turn it off when "rocking" the car.
        nardvark
        • 3 Years Ago
        Have you ever been parked in by snow? This is not "strange."
      MAX
      • 3 Years Ago
      Where has Consumer Reports been during all these Honda transmission issues?
        Rayvan
        • 3 Years Ago
        @MAX
        CR only reports what their subscribers send back on their anual questionaire. I know more than one Honda/Acura owner who is in complete denial about how many transmissions their cars have gone through. One insecure subscriber I used to know even fills out the questionaire for cars he doesn't even own, just to damage the reputation of a specific country's auto industry he despises (even though he's never even owned a car from that country). CR is very un-scientific.
          Dest
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Rayvan
          MAX: Has it occurred to you that even though Honda has some problems, other automakers have MORE problems? Hm? Rayvan: I highly doubt that most people will misreport major transmission problems out of "denial". If so, it doesn't matter because there's no reason to believe why owners of any specific automaker would deny it more than owners of other automakers.
          Renaurd
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Rayvan
          Such is Con-the-sumer Reports, I take everything they write with a dose of milk of magnesia.
          nardvark
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Rayvan
          Self-reported data always has issues. Hard to avoid in the automotive industry, as cars don't send back reports to manufacturers in most cases. We'll probably see more of that in the future though, as cars become equipped with cell connections.
        stickshiftn69
        • 3 Years Ago
        @MAX
        Honda paid consumer reports to not say anything .... Shhhhhh..... just like Toyota/Lexus with the unintended acceleration
          • 3 Years Ago
          @stickshiftn69
          [blocked]
          stickshiftn69
          • 3 Years Ago
          @stickshiftn69
          well obviously there is something wrong with the pedals or something wrong with the software because this is only occuring in TOYOTAS/Lexus and NOTHING ELSE if it was so much "driver error" than it would be happening with other car brands as well all the time maybe Toyotas accelerators are too f-ucking sensitive and they should work on that...but they will not because they don't care and they deny all the allegations any ways... so they hide behind all these "tests and more tests" that say nothing is wrong how the h-ell do you know that the particular cars in these "tests" were not altered because they fixed the problems in these particular cars which were "tested"... how the f-uck do you know what happened in these "tests" how on earth can you possibly get an accurate results from "tests" when they make millions of cheap cars and they only "test" a few dozen... thats like "testing" a few needles from a hay stack and dont give me that 80's audi bulls-hit because they f-ucked up as well... HOWEVER they corrected the problem and now Audi builts GREAT cars ... unlike Toyota which continues to just get cheaper and worse Toyota/Lexus sucks any way
          BG
          • 3 Years Ago
          @stickshiftn69
          Except the unintended acceleration proved to be user error. Tests and more tests never were able to replicate an electronic failure mode that caused acceleration.
      Gorgenapper
      • 3 Years Ago
      My parents old accord went through 3 rebuilt trannies before we dumped it. I was the victim of one of those blown trannies while driving on the highway. It's not fun limping back to city streets on 3rd gear at 60 - 70 kmh on a highway where everyone is going 100 - 120 or higher. Couldnt wait for the first exit to show up.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Gorgenapper
        [blocked]
          • 3 Years Ago
          [blocked]
          • 3 Years Ago
          [blocked]
      dukeisduke
      • 3 Years Ago
      This sounds like a software fix to what is really a hardware problem.
        KC
        • 3 Years Ago
        @dukeisduke
        No. It's a software fix to a software bug, that could lead to a hardware problem. Software is a set of instructions that tells a computer (CPU) what to do with a particular hardware.
          Rayvan
          • 3 Years Ago
          @KC
          Actually Duke is absolutely correct. It's a band-aid for a *very* weak secondary shaft that bends during something very routine in snow country.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        Billy
        • 3 Years Ago
        well some people do not like to hear the truth. I am thankful I do not own a Toyota. I have a 2007 Hyundai sonata with 148,000 miles( mostly highway miles) and the transmission in my car so far is running like it is still brand new. "Knock on wood".. None the less, I have to give Honda credit for doing a voluntary recall on their own.Other then buying reliable cars like Hyundai's, the other important thing about buying a car is that the automaker will stand behind their product. Toyota should take notes and see how Honda does it right..Me I have a Hyundai so I am solid and good to go many more miles. I guess if i brought a Toyota i would have already had to trade it in, but then again I dint buy junk. Toyota sucks. Sorry for your luck. You should trade in that heap of junk Toyota before it looses more of its value and buy a new Hyundai Sonata. you will be way more happy.. even a Honda accord would be good as you can see from this story Honda will stand behind their products, Plus I didn't know Honda really had many reliability issues say like Toyota does on a regularly Daly basic..
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Billy
          [blocked]
      BG
      • 3 Years Ago
      Life would have been a bit simpler if those people had bought manual transmission. And they might have experienced a more rewarding driving experience.
        straferhoo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @BG
        not if the manual tranny goes out at 88K like my Element.
          g2k
          • 3 Years Ago
          @straferhoo
          manuals are still more reliable. The more work computers do the less reliable the car will be
          Justin
          • 3 Years Ago
          @straferhoo
          You (Honda) can screw up any transmission, but I'd definitely say autos are easier to screw up. More computer controlled parts and harder to work on.
      Robert Sheehan
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is a software problem, which will occur in rare circumstances where the driver may shift from reverse to drive to neutral and back while trying to get out of mud or snow--a strategy that doesn't really work anyway and that could get you even more stuck. At any rate, while Honda voluntarily recalls 2.26 million vehicles for this "problem" that has resulted in NO injuries, Ford only recalled 144,000 F-150s out of a total of 1.3 million that the NHTSA requested it recall for spontaneous airbag deployments--despite the fact that there had been 255 confirmed instances of airbags deploying randomly--and Ford gets off the hook. And now, Ford is only recalling a fraction of the F-150s cited for possible fuel tank safety issues.
        merlot066
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Robert Sheehan
        Ford only recalled 144,000 F150s because they were made at a different assembly plant and they found out that they only had a problem with the ones from that plant.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Robert Sheehan
        [blocked]
      stickshiftn69
      • 3 Years Ago
      here is a FACT ... and this is coming from a solid GM / American car fan Honda builds a great car .... solid engine/chassis/electronics ... EXCEPT FOR THE TRANSMISSIONS WHICH ARE GARBAGE... but that is a critical part of the car so you better get it right and honda autos are total garbage but i have even heard of honda manuals with thier bucket load of problems as well
      jessesrq
      • 3 Years Ago
      Is Acura going to follow on Honda's heels? I am pretty sure my TSX has the same transmission as the Accord 4-cyl.
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