• Aug 4, 2011
When Top Gear said that, "In the real world, [the Tesla Roadster] doesn't seem to work," the electric automaker responded with a lawsuit. Nissan is taking a different tack, putting a clever twist on the one-sided, anti-EV message that the British television show keeps broadcasting about the faults of plug-in vehicles. In the town of Lincoln, where presenters Jeremy Clarkson and James May supposedly ran out of juice in a Nissan Leaf (it was all staged), Nissan will install two charging points, one dedicated to each of the TV stars.
The EVSE – a PodPoint charging unit – will be put in the downtown area and the two sockets, will "allow both Jeremy and James to recharge their batteries at the same time." How kind.

When the chaps aren't around, other plug-in vehicle drivers will be able to charge for free at the station, something that the local government representatives are obviously pleased about (as you can read in the statement after the jump). The station should be operational by the end of August, and Nissan says it is going to invite May and Clarkson to be the first to plug in there. That's an event we look forward to seeing on an episode of Top Gear right about... never. Show full PR text
NISSAN TO GIVE LINCOLN A PUBLIC PLUG

New charging installation to be dedicated to Top Gear after show highlighted lack of EV infrastructure in the city.
Twin charging points, one for each presenter, to be installed in city centre
Nissan is to fund the installation of Lincoln's first public electric vehicle charging point, following the recent Top Gear feature which highlighted the lack of charging infrastructure in the East Midlands city.

In the television programme, presenters Jeremy Clarkson and James May drove a pair of electric vehicles, including the Nissan LEAF, into the centre of Lincoln in an attempt to find somewhere to charge their cars.

Having failed to find any public infrastructure the pair were forced to charge at the University in the centre of the city, dangling cables through an open window.

Should the presenters choose to attempt the journey again in future, they will discover a newly-installed PodPoint charging unit dedicated to them. With two sockets, it would allow both Jeremy and James to recharge their batteries at the same time.

Charging will be free of charge to electric vehicle owners.

Councillor Fay Smith, Portfolio Holder for Environmental Services and Public Protection at the City of Lincoln Council, said: "The Top Gear programme highlighted the fact that Lincoln does not currently provide for electric cars and we're really pleased that Nissan is now funding a charging point. We're committed to reducing the city's carbon footprint, but know that we can't do it alone, so it's great that private businesses like Nissan are getting behind this and putting in the infrastructure."

The PodPoint charging unit is due to be installed before the end of the month and the presenters will be invited to return to Lincoln and be the first to plug in to the new charger.

Top Gear Executive Producer Andy Wilman said: "This is excellent news for the electric car community of Lincoln. If the charging point had existed when Top Gear were there, James wouldn't now be walking around with Jeremy's name tattooed on his bottom. Still, better late than never."

Nissan's Executive Vice President Andy Palmer said: "Research tells us that most LEAF owners will charge their car at home or at their place of work, but drivers like having the ability to 'top up' their charge when they are out and about, especially if they are making longer journeys. With its new charging points and the fame generated by Top Gear, Lincoln could find itself becoming a tourist destination for Nissan LEAF owners."


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  • 53 Comments
      brgtlm
      • 3 Years Ago
      Visit the Lincoln Cathedral while you're waiting for your EV to recharge....
      Kiiks
      • 3 Years Ago
      Electric cars might work if we run wireless charging conduits under every interstate and major road. Until then we will be limited by the battery. I like Nissan's cheeky comeback though. Well done.
      • 3 Years Ago
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      Dan
      • 3 Years Ago
      That is great. I dont believe EVs are the future either as Batteries have been developing for over a century and at some point you have to switch to another energy source. This is just speculation though, as is the thought that batteries can be made to last long and recharge quickly. Anyways. I think this is a great response from Nissan. This makes me want to high five the marketing department for a clever response.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan
        [blocked]
          Dan
          • 3 Years Ago
          "Plus, it's hard to argue with a 90% drop in fuel/transportation costs an EV can deliver." Its very easy to argue this as the electric car has a high over all price compared to cheaper fuel efficient gas and diesel, and has limited mileage until a long charge with limited battery life. Batteries have been developing since the 1800s. The cells have changed and become more efficient, Lithium batteries where developed in the early 1970s. There is a limit to the amount of energy you can harness from objects. I'm not saying we should stop developing this method as it would be great if they became as efficient has a petrol motor. I dont not see the technology improving fast enough or at the point where we will not have to make significant inconvenient adjustments over the more economical diesel or petrol motor. I may be completely wrong however, as may everyone that believes EVs are the future. I do know, without changes to oil regimes, we need to find something that will be more efficient then fossil fuels.
      jbm0866
      • 3 Years Ago
      Until battery capacity/longevity goes up and charge time goes down considerably...hybrid (of one type or the other) is the only way to go for people who don't do all their driving in a dense urban environment. Or the old fashionshed internal combustion engine only still works..
      Xedicon
      • 3 Years Ago
      *Jeremy voice* Some say, that the test of the two electric cars in question was staged, that it was rubbish, and that we're a bunch of lying anti electric juice boffins. But, and think about this for a moment, how often are you going to leave home with a perfect charge, always be able to get the same range and always be within range of a charging station? How much of your range is going to have to be dedicated exclusively to getting to and from a plug? Until there's more of these pull up plugs it's just not a practical solution most of the time but that's okay because cars like these will lead us to the ones that are. *end Jeremy voice*
      ken
      • 3 Years Ago
      I think Nissan has just missed the most important point: charging and range calculation are much more difficult than injecting petrol. Why someone must go through to all the trouble when petrol is still affordable and abundance?
      alkalinebay
      • 3 Years Ago
      since when did autoblog get invaded by green crowd? Electric cars are a joke (batteries do more damage to the enviroment) The future is in Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, this has been known for a long time.
        David
        • 3 Years Ago
        @alkalinebay
        Hydrogen, as abundent as it is, is hard to find as a pure element. Seperating Hydrogen from a compound requires a good amount of energy.
          lne937s
          • 3 Years Ago
          @David
          Gmetal- the problem with hydrogen is that you lose ~1/3 of the energy electrolyzing it from water. And you lose ~1/3 converting it from hydrogen back to electricity. The conversion processes involve losses. On top of that, hydrogen is not very dense. To carry two kilograms to power a car, you have to either tow a blimp or compress it to 700 bar, which is approximately 10,000 psi-- that consumes a lot of energy. In the end, from electricity in to electricity out, you lose 66-75% of the energy. In comparison, total charge/discharge losses on current automotive lithium ion batteries are less than 10%. The only way hydrogen will catch on is if we have so much electricity that we can afford to lose the majority of it making hydrogen.
      • 3 Years Ago
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        Making11s
        • 3 Years Ago
        Running out of electricity is what happens when you're too stupid/lazy/distracted to see the charge gauge and the trip counter. Should buy an electric car if you need to go more than 100 miles in a day? No, but for something like 90% of drivers, it's plenty. That's especially true if you're a two or more car family. The commuter can use the EV and the gas-powered vehicle can be the road trip machine and people hauler.
      Kris Dimitroff
      • 3 Years Ago
      I have nothing against EVs. I wont buy one 'cause I like drivers cars, but I have nothing against EVs. What bothers me now is that the EV likers are the kind of people who think they are so environmental consciousness that every petrol head is the dirtiest polluter on this world and they look at you as mass murderer. I hate that! And they seem to forget where the power of their vehicles comes from. Most of the electricity comes from Thermal power stations and most of them burn fossil fuels. The efficiency of a typical TPS is between 35-40%. The best of them have 48% efficiency. Which is about the same as the modern internal combustion engines. Don't forget that in order to reach the socket in your home there are about 6,5% loses in the power lines. Then the battery's efficiency for Li-ion is about 99%. The type of the inverters which converts the power for the electric motor has efficiency about 90%. It varies a lot, but this is a typical value for the best of them. And the engine itself (Brushless DC electric motor is the most popular one) has average efficiency about 95%. Again it varies and depends on the work regime. If you are not bored to dead yet and you are still with me in the end you get worst efficiency (about 35%) than ICE. My question is if you actually are responsible for more CO2 per kilometer than ICE powered vehicle and you have the disadvantages of the dead weight of the batteries, short range and slow recharge why you stupid Greenpeace hippies think you are smarter than me? Why you don't go and try to reduce the emissions on some bigger polluters. Like airplanes, power stations I don't know, cow fart!!!
        Nico
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Kris Dimitroff
        Do like. Though, it does de-motivate you from going somewhere. Such as, let's go to the movie~ oh the battery's low, so stay home for the nite,,,
        Jim
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Kris Dimitroff
        I'm surprised you have +7. What you are saying is very untrue. Since you are comparing a system of energy, from plant to car, you most also consider that for gasoline. For gasoline, you first have to mine it. Then you have to transport it (burns fuel) then you have to refine it (burns fuel) then you have distribute it (burns fuel). And in the end, you burn it in your car. You are discounting the fact that in some places, most power come from renewable resources making your TPS comment moot. While most people seem to take you seriously, the more educated people will laugh at you for making such ignorant comments. Electricity, joules for joules, is more efficient and less pollutant than gasoline no matter how you look at it.
      • 3 Years Ago
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      Kimura
      • 3 Years Ago
      Well play Nissan, well played.
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