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Thanks to AutoblogGreen tipster Marcos, we now know that at least 261 charging stations have been installed and are operational in Portugal. While that certainly seems like plenty, especially since only 100 or so electric vehicles are currently tooling around the streets of that country, there are apparently 1,000 additional chargers to come.
Technically, Mobi.E is the "Portuguese electric mobility consortium," which basically means that it's more or less a conglomerate of local governments, utilities and organizations with a shared interest in advancing the deployment of plug-in vehicles, including two-wheelers.

Mobi.E say that by June of 2012, some 1,300 public-use, Level 2 charging points will be installed across Portugal and that at least 50 DC quick-charge stations will eventually be installed too. Once all of the 1,350 chargers become operational, Mobi.E says that at no point in Portugal will a driver ever be more than 80 miles away from the nearest charging station. Imagine that! Read more about Mobi.E here. Hat tip to Marcos!

[Source: Mobi.E]


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  • 10 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      Will there be charging stations in the Azores and Madeira?
        CR7
        • 3 Years Ago
        Cristiano Ronaldo > Lionel Messi Go Real Madrid!
      • 3 Years Ago
      Cars and bikes can charge using a standard 16A CEE plug. Some stations have allready the 5 pin socket that the cars use. They are giving access cards for beta testers and recharging is free until the end of 2011.
      Doug
      • 3 Years Ago
      What style charge connector are they using?
        skierpage
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Doug
        Mobi.e's presentation http://www.portugalglobal.pt/PT/PortugalNews/NewsRoom/Documents/mobie2100311.pdf says "Evolution to the future mode 3 standard IEC 62196 connector (currently cable mode 1 or 2, with IEC 60309 connector)" Next question is whether the box has a cable or whether the car driver plugs in. Mobi.e's FAQ talks about how the cable is thick and can't easily be cut, but their pictures show a box without a cable, which makes sense: you drive up in your EV and regardless of what receptacle the car has (I don't know which European EVs have an IEC 60309 receptacle), you connect to the socket with your own portable charging cord. As I understand it, IEC 62196 mode 1 and mode 2 require different plugs, at least on the charging station. Mode 1 supplies 240V at 16 amps, usually using the IEC 60309 "dumb camping ground RV connector" blue connector with three pins. Mode 2 is a more complicated. According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEC_62196#Mode_2 , in order to supply more power "not exceeding 32 A and not exceeding 250 V a.c. single-phase or 480 V a.c. three-phase utilizing standardized single-phase or three-phase socket-outlets", it requires at least extra pins in the charging station, thus a different charging cable. I don't know if mobi.e is standardizing on the beefier receptacle, providing two receptacles, or making drivers carry two cords.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Funny, there seems to be more charging stations than EV's on the road. I have a LEAF reservation, actually in first 30 online pre-reservations in Portugal (made more than 1 year ago), still no official delivery date for the car. Even after state incentives have been transferred to end user initial price (all delivered EV's are still awaiting for state incentives to be payed back), so a LEAF costs here ~37k€ (~52kUSD) there must be some problem with supply of a couple hundred EV's for this country...
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      that's pretty good. 50 level 3 stations will allow a workable network over all of Portugal's 530km. then they will need some reasonably priced EVs and it's close to a done deal. who's going to be first with a 20k$ 150km EV. I guess we'll see that in 2015, maybe 2014. it could easily be done today but humans being what they are..
        Jorge Pinto
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        um... Portugal has over 1200km of coast line, resembles the shape of a rectangle, more than 700km in height, roughly 250km in width. EVs are really well suited for average people working on big cities, i.e. doing a lot of commuting, so the size of the country means nothing. Unless we're talking about pizza delivery runs on mega cities like Mexico, Beijing and such... range in a non-issue. Right now, for 20k$ (about 14k€) you'd have a hard time buying a 1.2 gas renault clio. That's 23% of VAT on top of 10 to 45% of CO-related taxation, and we still pay 10 to 300€ of yearly tax (per CO and particle emission). EVs skip those CO taxes (buy-time and yearly), and get a 5k€ tax-credit... crank a worksheet and you see economical sense in an 35K€ EV doing 20KKm a year, at the 5th year.
        uncle_sam
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        Oh no humans are bad. The not only won't make cheap flimsy fiber glass evs, but they also slaugther each other on behalf of race or religion. Humans are dumb, and so is your whining. the cars are there (almost) the renault fluence costs around 20.000 € (+ leasing of the battery)
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 3 Years Ago
          @uncle_sam
          it's the 'almost' that concerns me : ) the better place car costs 22k euro plus sales tax and battery not included. 22k euro is 32k$ sans battery. so not quite : ) and yes humanity is deplorable. our waiting friends above in their electric vehicles are certainly not impressed.