It's been a while since we've heard anything about the Mercedes-Benz SL-Class. That could be because the current model dates back to 2003, undergoing the facelift we know today back in 2008. But now we've got news, and it's a mixed bag of good and bad.

The bad news first: word is, Mercedes is discontinuing the twelve-cylinder versions of the SL. The SL600 was the first to be phased out, and now it appears the SL65 AMG is getting the axe as well. There's no word yet on whether or not that includes the hardcore, fixed-roof SL65 AMG Black Series.

The good news, however, is that phasing out of the V12 roadsters could signal the imminent arrival of the next-gen SL. That's expected to show up sometime next year as a 2013 model, and will come as good news for SL buyers as the current model has lived longer than anything in the Mercedes-Benz range this side of the Geländewagen.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 35 Comments
      hp
      • 3 Years Ago
      "There's no word yet on whether or not that includes the hardcore, fixed-roof SL65 AMG Black Series." Of course it wouldn't, that was a limited production car only available 1 model year, 2009.
      Jamie Stark
      • 3 Years Ago
      According to a few other sources, the V12 SL65 AMG will indeed be back on the next generation SL. That engine was made to last through 2018 without major updates. The SL600 will however be discontinued permanently due to slow sales. Customers simply opted for the AMG verions if they needed something faster than the SL500.
      You guy
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'm guessing the V12 is going to go the way of the dodo for Benz. Fewer cylinders and equivalent displacement usually nets better mileage. I'd expect the next go-around to have a V10 or V8 with forced induction.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        TruthHertz
        • 3 Years Ago
        Are we going to drive on electric pavement? Until technology is developed where I can drive from New York to L.A. and not have to wait an hour or more to have my energy supply replenished every 100 miles, there will always be a place for internal combustion. BTW, where does most of our power come from. That's right. Fossil fuels. Stuff that is burned. And this is because the same tree hugging, squirrel humping hippies like you that demand green this and electric that, are the same ones protesting modern clean nuclear power. In short, you are all retarded and simply bitch for the sake of bitching.
          QAZZY
          • 3 Years Ago
          @TruthHertz
          I thought it was tree humping and deer hugging? Damn hippies. They want to take our guns and now our cars. I will never part with my guns, most notably my Glock 31. I'm not parting with my M3 anytime soon (oh, wait, my lease is ending), either.
        TruthHertz
        • 3 Years Ago
        Once technology advances to the point that bio fuel can be generated in a fashion to which it is carbon neutral and inexpensive, I think electric development will slowly start to decline. Imagine if something similar to e85 could be generated for about $1.00 a gallon without using food. Would you really want to have a giant container mounted on your car that is filled with battery acid at that point? Just wait until one of these batteries rupture and melt someones face or eat into a historic cobblestone road. Ever see what a lithium ion battery does when exposed to oxygen? All this electric talk is idiocy if you do a little research. However, most of the people pushing this crap are touchy feely liberals that utilize emotion more than cold hard facts. Electric has been debunked a million times over. Most of the raw materials are in countries like China, and battery technology isn't advancing that quickly. Electrical infrastructure can't handle the load if everyone charged their cars at night. Range anxiety. In addition, as soon as electric starts becoming more viable, the Arabs will start to increase production capacity to make good ole gas look more attractive. Then there is the current sources of electricity I've already mentioned which are burning fossil fuels in order to make the power that goes to our homes. Why am I such an ass? Because the people still pushing this are dumber than the rocks we need to strip mine in order to make the battery packs they need for their fantasy.
          TerryP
          • 3 Years Ago
          @TruthHertz
          Even though TruthHertz may come off as a ********, I completely agree with him.
          TruthHertz
          • 3 Years Ago
          @TruthHertz
          Dan Formula 1 isn't about the future, it's about pushing the envelope. Carbon Fiber Monocoque Chassis Composite Carbon Brake Rotors Pneumatic Actuated Valves Sequential Manual Gearboxes with a 9 cm Carbon Ceramic Clutches Ground Effects with Massive Spoilers and Diffusers Kinetic Energy Recovery Systems How much longer do I have to wait until I can get some of this stuff in a midsize sedan under $25,000? Oh, that's right, probably never. Do you have any other dumb crap to share or are you too busy listening to your Ipod? Just because they try something out in racing doesn't mean it will go mainstream or even get implemented.
          TruthHertz
          • 3 Years Ago
          @TruthHertz
          BTW, are you so worthless that you can't move your pinky to hit the shift key when you start a sentence? I'll remember your name alright. I'll remember it as a ****ing dumb*** that should be sterilized.
        Justin Garak
        • 3 Years Ago
        Dan, you're absolute right and no smart person should of would disagree with you. However what you granola hippie retard types don't seem to understand is that change will be justified based real merits such as performance, market feasibility, and technological advancement, not Captain Planet propaganda.
        Evan McMiller
        • 3 Years Ago
        Why do you have to be such an ass about it...nobody's saying that far in the future, electric cars will proliferate...but to sit here and pretend they're the norm now is beyond stupid.
      TruthHertz
      • 3 Years Ago
      The only reason to increase cylinder count for a fixed displacement is to keep piston speeds lower in order to enable higher amounts of revolutions for a given time. The downside is the added complexity, additional moving parts, and additional drag due to the additional said parts with more internal surface area inside the cylinders. That said, with the exception of sounding cool and being able to say that you have a V12 motor, the Mercedes and BMW V12s were fairly pointless. I see an I.C.E. future where the V6 is the new "small block" and the Inline-4 slowly becomes the norm, even in some larger trucks. This will be especially true if US regulators ever pull their heads out of their hindquarters and stop causing massive emissions demands on diesel that don't allow American versions to approach the efficiency that European and other foreign versions are able to achieve before all the EPA tinkering.
        TruthHertz
        • 3 Years Ago
        @TruthHertz
        This has nothing to do with the amount of cylinders, but more to do with how the cylinders are setup to obtain your displacement. Longer stroke generates more torque. However, it is counterproductive to high rpm operation. For a given displacement, the longer a stoke is, the smaller the bore is and therefore the intake and exhaust valves shrink. This restricts engine breathing. Having a 4.0L V8 would allow excellent high rpm performance. The BMW M3 has one with only a 75 mm stroke but a wide 92 mm bore to allow larger valves for excellent breathing at higher revs. In contrast to this you can compare it to the GM 4.2L "Atlas" Inline-6. Granted it is a tad bigger, but it's stroke is 102 mm long while having almost the same bore. The GM engine generates significantly more low end torque but lacks the high end punch that the 414 horsepower M3 S65B40 V8 engine can produce. If you look at engines with ~100+ mm strokes (4 inches) you will not find many that venture much north of 6,000 rpms with the exception of racing. Even the Mustang Cobra R with it's 104 mm bore in a 5.4L V8 and race quality internals only went to 6500 rpms.
      Shiftright
      • 3 Years Ago
      Oh no! What will idle rich trophy wives of Beverly Hills drive?
      hello dogs
      • 3 Years Ago
      in a bad economy why change te sl
      Matt Frawley
      • 3 Years Ago
      I can tell you about classic Mercedes Benz SL is very good profit for 1970's 1980's about mostly popular bought 1970's and 1980's SL were non AMG and non V12. it was six straight and eight cylinder . I think between 250 to 300 horsepower. if new generation SL will back to old six or eight cylinders. it will keep 500SL
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Matt Frawley
        [blocked]
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      transam
      • 3 Years Ago
      I hope that this does not mean the begining of the end for MB V12s. That would be a shame.
        TerryP
        • 3 Years Ago
        @transam
        This is is like BMW replacing the inline-6 with the turbo-4.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      X
      • 3 Years Ago
      That would be a Dumb move, The V12 is the SL600 and SL65 are signature model,the engines that everyone wants BUT CANT AFFORDED. Besides,how many other roadster (couple/Convertible) a V12 and the longevity of the SL. Anyways, time will tell,the demand for the Current V12 model will go through the roof high if this news is true,especially since model of the LS models sold are V8's.
        TruthHertz
        • 3 Years Ago
        @X
        They can still make it. Instead of an extra 4 cyliders, you get a turbo and also burn less gas.
          TruthHertz
          • 3 Years Ago
          @TruthHertz
          Actually, you kind of have it, but not really. An S600 would have a V12 that is naturally aspirated, while a S65 AMG would be the same V12 but with the said turbochargers. In lieu of this, MB could simply turn up the boost on the V8 with direct injection and call it a day. Less emissions, less weight, better handling, and less trips to the gas station with all the "normal" people. Everyone wins.
          Freddi
          • 1 Year Ago
          @TruthHertz
          You do realize, though, that the SL63 AMG is similar to what you described, right? Less emissions, less trips to the gas station with "normal" people, and, being an AMG model, presumably less weight and better handling. What isn't already there that you want?
          TruthHertz
          • 3 Years Ago
          @TruthHertz
          Clairification, same number of cylinders, but not the EXACT same engine.
          QAZZY
          • 3 Years Ago
          @TruthHertz
          The current V12s are already twin turbos.
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