city safety screen shot

Volvo just got a major thumbs up in the safety department. Both the National Highway Traffic Safety Institute and Insurance Institute for Highway Safety have stated that the automaker's City Safety technology helps reduce, and even prevent, low-speed collisions. In fact, the IIHS noted that users of City Safety wind up filing nearly 30 percent less at-fault claims.

The system, which is available on the Volvo XC60, works by monitoring traffic in front of the vehicle. When driving at a speed of between two and 19 miles per hour, the car can apply the brakes should forward traffic suddenly do the same. When the difference in speed between your car and one in front of you is nine mph or less, the Volvo will brake quickly enough to avoid an accident. Above that threshold and you're most likely going into the car in front of you but the damage will be greatly reduced compared to an accident involving cars not utilizing the City Safety System.

We tried it out for ourselves a while back, and our own Dan Roth escaped without putting a dent into his bosses BMW. Check that clip out for yourself after the jump, and be sure to read the full press releases while you're down there.




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Insurance Claim Analysis: Volvo City Safety System Prevents Collisions

Highway Loss Data Institute Finds Volvo XC60 Gets Into Fewer Crashes

ROCKLEIGH, N.J. (July 19, 2011) - A newly published analysis from the Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI) and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) indicates that Volvo XC60s get into fewer low-speed crashes than comparable vehicles thanks to Volvo's City Safety technology, a standard feature on all XC60s.

HLDI examined claim frequency under property damage liability, bodily injury liability and collisions. Their data concluded frequency rates for the XC60 were lower than all other midsize luxury SUVs, specifically:

  • Claims under property damage liability coverage were filed 27 percent less often for the XC60 than other midsize luxury SUVs.
  • Claim frequencies for injuries for the XC60 were filed about half as often compared to other midsize luxury SUVs.
  • Collision claim frequencies for the XC60 were 22 percent lower than all other midsize luxury SUVs.

"This is our first real-world look at an advanced crash avoidance technology, and the findings are encouraging," said Adrian Lund, president of HLDI and IIHS. "City Safety is helping XC60 drivers avoid the kinds of front-to-rear low speed crashes that frequently happen on congested roads."

IIHS last year estimated that current crash avoidance features have the potential to prevent or mitigate as many as 1.9 million crashes each year, and current users have stated the systems help them to be safer drivers.

"It is great to see validation from HLDI and IIHS of the safety systems that we at Volvo are continually developing," said Thomas Broberg, Volvo Car Corp.'s senior safety expert. "This is another step towards achieving our Vision 2020 of eliminating serious injuries and fatalities by the year 2020, and an even larger step towards a crash-free future."

HLDI also looked at how the crash reductions for the XC60 affected overall insurance costs:

  • Overall payouts under property damage liability for XC60s were 20 percent lower than losses for all other midsize luxury SUVs.
  • Estimated overall collision losses for the XC60 were 31 percent lower than all other midsize luxury SUVs.

"The lower claim frequencies found by HLDI prove that City Safety is preventing crashes and thus reducing insurance costs," said John Maloney, VCNA's vice president of marketing and product planning. "There's an opportunity here for insurance companies to begin offering a discount on vehicles equipped with City Safety or similar crash-avoidance technologies."

HLDI analysts compared insurance claims data for the 2010 model XC60 with two control groups: other 2009-10 midsize luxury SUVs and other 2009-10 Volvo models. The analysis controlled for a variety of geographic and demographic factors that can affect claims. Geographic factors include garaging state and vehicle density (the number of registered vehicles per square mile). Demographic factors take into account such things as the primary driver's age, gender and marital status. Other factors include calendar year plus the policy deductible.

HLDI defines the three types of auto insurance coverage as follows: property damage liability pays for damage an at-fault vehicle does to another's property as the result of a crash. Bodily injury liability generally pays for injuries to people involved in the crash other than the insured at-fault driver. Collision pays for damage to the insured vehicle.

City Safety keeps a watch on vehicles in front with the help of a laser sensor built into the windscreen at the height of the rearview mirror. Between 2-19 mph, the car automatically brakes if the driver does not respond in time when the car in front slows down or stops - or if the driver is driving too fast towards a stationary object. If the relative speed difference between the two vehicles is less than 9 mph, the collision can be entirely avoided. If the speed difference is between 9-19 mph, the speed at impact is reduced by about one half, thereby mitigating the collision. City Safety also is also standard on the 2011 and 2012 S60, 2012 S80 and 2012 XC70.

In addition to City Safety, the XC60 is available with Pedestrian Detection with Full Auto Brake as part of its optional Technology Package. Pedestrian Detection with Full Auto Brake uses forward-looking radar and digital camera identification that scans an object and matches its shape against an image database of about 10,000 forms. The system can track up to 64 pedestrians and their paths - all within 50 milliseconds.

If a pedestrian walks into the car's path and an impact is imminent, a warning light and tone warn the driver. If the driver does not react, the car will apply up to 100 percent available braking force, thereby avoiding a collision if the car is traveling 19 mph or less. At 20 mph and higher, the available breaking force will significantly mitigate the collision.

In the effort to continually be the industry leader in safety, Volvo is working on plans for the next generation of active safety detection which features animal detection. The system, much like today's pedestrian detection, will feature a radar sensor and infrared camera - and it will function in the dark when the likelihood of hitting an animal increases. The system must be complex in order to recognize a variety of animals in differing sizes - from dogs to moose. According to IIHS, from 1993-2007, 2,499 people died in collisions involving wild animals and the number of collisions continues to increase.


Statement by NHTSA Administrator David Strickland
On IIHS study on Volvo's City Safety Crash Avoidance System


"With our core mission of reducing traffic fatalities, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is deeply interested in the potential for crash avoidance technology to significantly improve safety for drivers, passengers, and our communities. That's why NHTSA is currently conducting extensive research on 'forward collision warning' systems-as well as the rapidly evolving crash imminent braking and dynamic brake support systems.

"The agency is aware of Volvo's impressive City Safety system and the many other systems that operate at higher speeds and hold the promise of preventing deaths and injuries as well as preventing property damage. As we continue to evaluate these systems and their ability to reduce the frequency and severity of vehicle collisions, we are pleased to see automobile manufacturers moving forward with new technologies designed to improve safety."

IIHS
High-tech system on Volvos is preventing crashes


ARLINGTON, VA - Vehicles are doing a better job of protecting people in crashes, but a new crop of advanced technology aims to prevent many crashes from happening altogether. A new study by the Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI) finds that one kind of advanced forward collision avoidance system is working to prevent about a quarter of the common low-speed crashes that happen in everyday commuter traffic.

The study of insurance claims found that Volvo XC60 midsize SUVs outfitted with a standard collision avoidance feature called City Safety are far less likely to be involved in low-speed crashes than comparable vehicles without the system. City Safety is designed to help a driver avoid rear-ending another vehicle in slow-moving, heavy traffic. Claims under property damage liability coverage - the insurance that pays for damage to vehicles that an at-fault driver hits - were filed 27 percent less often for the XC60 than other midsize luxury SUVs.

"This is our first real-world look at an advanced crash avoidance technology, and the findings are encouraging," says Adrian Lund, president of HLDI. "City Safety is helping XC60 drivers avoid the kinds of front-to-rear, low-speed crashes that frequently happen on congested roads."

Volvo and other automakers also offer optional forward collision warning systems designed to help drivers avoid crashes at higher speeds than City Safety does. HLDI is working with several automakers to evaluate the loss experience of these and other crash avoidance technologies as the features make their way into more vehicles. City Safety is the first system of its kind. It addresses more common crashes than higher-speed systems do and has been standard on XC60s since the 2010 model year. It also is standard on 2011-12 S60 sedans and 2012 model S80 sedans and XC70 wagons.

City Safety automatically brakes to avoid a front-to-rear crash in certain low-speed conditions. It uses an infrared laser sensor built into the windshield to monitor the area in front of the SUV when traveling at speeds of about 2 to 19 mph. It detects and reacts to other vehicles within 18 feet of the XC60's front bumper during both daytime and nighttime driving. If the speed difference between vehicles is less than 9 mph, City Safety helps drivers avoid some crashes altogether. If the difference is between 9 and 19 mph, the feature may not prevent the crash but will reduce the consequences. It's not designed to work at speeds faster than 19 mph.

Unlike forward collision warning systems developed to address higher-speed crashes, City Safety doesn't alert the driver before it engages and brakes at the last instant if the driver doesn't react in time.

How HLDI did the study: HLDI analysts compared insurance claims data for the 2010 XC60 with 2 groups: other 2009-10 midsize luxury SUVs and other 2009-10 Volvo models. The analysis controlled for a variety of geographic and demographic factors that can affect claims. Geographic factors include garaging state and vehicle density (the number of registered vehicles per square mile). Demographic factors take into account such things as the primary driver's age, gender, and marital status. Other factors include calendar year and the policy deductible.

HLDI looked at how often claims are filed, also known as claim frequency, and claim costs, also known as claim severity. Researchers examined claim frequency and payouts under 3 types of auto insurance coverage: property damage liability, bodily injury liability, and collision. Property damage liability pays for damage an at-fault driver's vehicle does to other people's property as a result of a crash. Bodily injury liability generally pays for injuries to people involved in the crash other than the insured at-fault driver. Collision pays for damage to the insured vehicle.

Lower claim frequencies: Claim frequency rates for the XC60, the only Volvo with the feature in the study, were lower than all other midsize luxury SUVs combined, as well as other Volvos, under all 3 types of insurance coverage.

"These are very large effects," says Lund, who notes that some differences in driving styles of XC60 owners might come into play. However, "the pattern of results strongly indicates that City Safety is preventing low-speed crashes and reducing insurance costs.

"That's great news for consumers. As people grow more aware of the risks of distracted driving, crash avoidance systems like this one can help to ensure that a momentary lapse of attention during a congested commute doesn't result in a crash."

XC60s in the study had fewer claims, but when owners did seek payment under property damage liability, the average claim cost of $3,058 was higher than for vehicles in either control group - 10 percent higher than for other midsize luxury SUVs and 27 percent higher than for other Volvos.

"Although it may seem counterintuitive, higher payouts for property damage liability are a sign that City Safety works," says Matthew Moore, HLDI vice president and director of the study.

Because the feature is preventing the kinds of fender-benders drivers get into on busy roads, XC60 owners aren't filing as many low-cost claims (those less than $1,500) as people who drive other midsize luxury SUVs. The frequency of high-severity claims ($7,000 and higher) was about the same for the XC60 as it was for the control vehicles.

"Crash avoidance technology has a lot of promise," Lund says. "We are doing more research to see if other systems live up to their billing."

VOLVO XC60 CITY SAFETY INSURANCE LOSSES

Claim frequency Claim severity Overall losses vs. other midsize luxury SUVs Property damage liability
-27% +$270 -$17
Bodily injury liability
-51%
-
-
Collision
-22%
-$517
-$98
vs. other Volvos
Property damage liability
-19%
+$646
+$2
Bodily injury liability
-49%
-
-
Collision
-17%
-$147
-$53