• Martin Winterkorn, Chairman of the Board of Management of Volkswagen AG, speaks as Volkswagen hosted a grand opening of its new plant and to launch its all-new Passat in Chattanooga, Tenn. on Tuesday, May 24, 2011. Volkswagen is jumping into the U.S. auto market with a new Passat that is bigger, cheaper and built domestically in hopes of breaking into the competitive midsize sedan market. (AP Photo/Billy Weeks)

  • Martin Winterkorn, Chairman of the Board of Management of Volkswagen AG, eight-year-old Max Page, who plays Darth Vader in the Passat commercial, and Frank Fischer, Chairman and CEO of Volkswagen of America Chattanooga, pose in front of a new Passat as Volkswagen hosted a grand opening of its new plant and to launch its all-new Passat in Chattanooga, Tenn., Wednesday. May 24, 2011. (AP Photo/Billy Weeks)

  • Child actor Max Page, dressed as Darth Vader, right, plays to the crowd as Volkswagen management push the red button Tuesday, May 24, 2011, at the Volkswagen Grand Opening in Chattanooga, Tenn. Volkswagen is jumping into the U.S. auto market with a new Passat that is bigger, cheaper and built domestically in hopes of breaking into the competitive midsize sedan market. (AP Photo/Billy Weeks)

  • Workers inspect the undercarriage of a new Passat inside the new Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga, Tenn. on Tuesday, May 24, 2011. Volkswagen is jumping into the U.S. auto market with a new Passat that is bigger, cheaper and built domestically in hopes of breaking into the competitive midsize sedan market. (AP Photo/Billy Weeks)

  • Workers inspect the undercarriage of a new Passat inside the new Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga, Tenn. on Tuesday, May 24, 2011. Volkswagen is jumping into the U.S. auto market with a new Passat that is bigger, cheaper and built domestically in hopes of breaking into the competitive midsize sedan market. (AP Photo/Billy Weeks)

  • Volkswagen Group of America. Er�ffnung des Volkswagen Werkes im US-amerikanischen Chattanooga, Tennessee, am Dienstag (24.05.2011). Photo: Friso Gentsch/Volkswagen
  • Volkswagen Group of America. Er�ffnung des Volkswagen Werkes im US-amerikanischen Chattanooga, Tennessee, am Dienstag (24.05.2011). Photo: Friso Gentsch/Volkswagen
  • Volkswagen Group of America. Er�ffnung des Volkswagen Werkes im US-amerikanischen Chattanooga, Tennessee, am Dienstag (24.05.2011). Photo: Friso Gentsch/Volkswagen
  • Photo by Angela Lewis/Chattanooga Times Free Press - May 24, 2011 - Volkswagen and government officials (from left) Gunther Scherelis, Frank Fischer, Michael Macht, Klaus Scharioth, Tennessee Governor Bill Haslama and Jonathan Brown answer questions during a press conference at the Volkswagen Grand Opening Tuesday, May 24, 2011, in Chattanooga, Tenn. (AP Photo/Chattanooga Times Free Press, Angela Lewis)

  • Martin Winterkorn, Chairman of the Board of Management of Volkswagen AG, right, addresses the media as Volkswagen hosts a grand opening of its new plant and to launch its all-new Passat in Chattanooga, Tenn. on Tuesday, May 24, 2011. Volkswagen is jumping into the U.S. auto market with a new Passat that is bigger, cheaper and built domestically in hopes of breaking into the competitive midsize sedan market. (AP Photo/Billy Weeks)

The United Auto Workers has been trying for the past 30 years to unionize plants operated by foreign automakers in the South, but to date, there has been absolutely zero success. There are many reasons the UAW has consistently failed over time, including allegations of intimidation and fear tactics from transplant management. Some foreign automakers won't even hire former union employees for fear that the new hire could help organize the facility. And then there is the fact that unions aren't nearly as prevalent in the South as they are north of the Mason Dixon line.

UAW boss Bob King has said that he'd like to renew efforts to unionize, and USA Today reports that Volkswagen's new Chattanooga plant could be a prime candidate. There are many reasons the UAW could have more success with VW. For starters, VW actually had a unionized plant in Pennsylvania before it closed in 1988, and the German automaker has a rich history of working with unions around the world. Further, VW spokesman Guenther Scherelis said in a statement that the choice to unionize belongs with the workers, adding "one of Volkswagen's core values is the basic right of employees to have a voice in the company."

But while VW may be more open to the UAW, Tennessee Senator Bob Corker has been less than flattering in his description of the labor organization. Back in November, Corker called a unionized Chattanooga plant "highly detrimental" to the facility, adding that he can't imagine that a company could voluntarily bring the UAW into the mix.

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