• 5
The fuel efficiency of vehicles sold in Europe in 2010 improved slightly versus those sold in 2009, according to provisional European Union data. The EU says that last year's numbers show that CO2 emissions from passenger vehicles fell by 3.7 percent, moving the average emissions down to 140 grams per kilometer.

The EU, home to some 500 million people, has set a target of reducing average emissions from vehicles to 130 g/km of CO2 per kilometer by 2015. Last year's improvements put the EU on track to overachieve on its target. EU climate commissioner, Connie Hedegaard, had this to say:
These data show again that setting targets... stimulates the car industry to put greener cars on the market. These innovations also ensure Europe's car industry remains competitive in the changing global market.
Perhaps surprisingly, it's not the onslaught of hybrid vehicles or diesel-sipping machines that have led to the EU's reduced emissions. In fact, it's technologies applied to the good ol' gas-burnin' engine that has reduced emissions the most.

[Source: Ward's Auto – sub. req.]


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 5 Comments
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Months Ago
      douche automakers have felt the threat of the EV so suddenly they can make ICE cars with much better mileage. I suppose we just need to find something more idealistic than EVs and suggest that. then they will propose EVs to avoid doing the right thing
      Nick
      • 3 Months Ago
      Considering that about 50% of cars in Europe are fuel-sipping Diesels, and that more and more people make the switch to Diesel, I'm sure it is a factor in it.
        paulwesterberg
        • 3 Months Ago
        @Nick
        Diesel releases more CO2 per unit burned than gasoline.
          Peter
          • 3 Months Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          My bad the first Mini Cooper S was 199g/km. Its 149 now. Its still considered a car with frugal consumption on this side of the ocean and yet represents an above average consumption in the EU. We have a way to go, and while some want a revolutionary change, there is huge potential to do better here in an incremental fashion including better smaller cars, less attention to excesses of horses in the engine compartment and more attention to how much hay (or cellulosic ethanol) those horses need, diesels, hybrids, CNG, and EV's.
          Peter
          • 3 Months Ago
          @paulwesterberg
          The EU gains are in the gas market, but this does not mean that we cannot make gains on this side (140g/km is their current, a Mini Cooper S is 199g/km, so our average must be...?) by increasing the amount of diesels in North America, particularly for vehicles that have high highway use. Diesel does produce 15% more CO2 per unit burned, but it is more than 15% more efficient in the burning so there is a potential here. There is a reason why long haul trucks (where capital cost is no where near as important as running costs) burn diesel.