• Jul 4th 2011 at 5:03PM
  • 12
Mitsubishi i-MiEV – Click above for high-res image gallery

Mitsubishi Motors Australia has announced the price of its 2012 i-MiEV and it's a shocker. At $48,800 Australian ($51,444 U.S. at the current exchange rate), the 2012 i-MiEV is $14,977 less than the outgoing 2011 model. Now that's one heck of a discount (some simple math shows that the discount is 22.5 percent).

The 2012 i-MiEV will launch in Australia this August. When it does, it will be available for outright purchase, unlike the A$63,000 ($66,421 U.S.), three-year-lease-only 2011 model. Despite the drop in price, the 2012 i-MiEV features some additional items, including side and curtain airbags and electronic stability control. Mitsubishi says massive inquiries about the 2012 i-MiEV prompted the automaker to release details months ahead of launch in Australia.



[Source: Ward's Auto – sub. req.]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 12 Comments
      jkirkebo
      • 4 Years Ago
      Hmm. In Norway the 2011 model already costs US $46k while the cheapest Alto is $26k. If they slash the Norwegian prices with $15k too it might become the top selling car in Norway (it has a ~1% market share already).
      Ben Crockett
      • 4 Years Ago
      Good to see that Mitsubishi are finally offering it for sale rather than lease-only no option to purchase. Vehicles are much more expensive here in Australia as is most things so no real suprise on price. It is cheaper than (as expected) the anticipated price of the Nissan Leaf which is expected to be sub $55K. Its a shame though the 2012 vehicle won't have the Toshiba SCiB batteries in it - that will be a real game changer when they do.
      PeekOyle
      • 4 Years Ago
      Here in Australia the similar sized 3cylinder Suzuki Alto sells for about $12k. So this makes the $48k iMiev the most poor value car in the Australian Market.
      Vince
      • 4 Years Ago
      thats a good sign as that sits it directly beside the premium prius. Now for mitsubishi the release the lease car at the end of its tenure.
      Marco Polo
      • 4 Years Ago
      @Peak Oyle and Ben Crocket. The Indian built, 1 litre, 3-cylinder, manual geared, Suzuki Alto's 'drive away' Price is closer to $14000. However, that's immaterial. If you are that desperate to save gas, buy an EV scooter! I have written about this before, but at the risk of being repetitive, what the hell is the matter with my fellow Australians! ? The Mitsubishi iMev is more expensive, and inferior, to the Australian produced BEV, Blade Electron 1V (and the just released Blade Runner). I have driven both the iMev and Blade and chose to purchase Blade. Blade is the first EV manufacturer in the world to release a 4 seat, 4 door, EV hatchback. Australia is truly a nation where a prophet like Ross Blade, has no honour in his own country! ( unless a sporting hero). The Blade Electron is almost totally ignored by the Australian media, and politicians alike. This is despite the fact that Mitsubishi has been revealed as a major donor to the Australian Labour Party, particularly during the tender process for the purchase of test EV's by NSW, and the Sydney City Council . (the Centre-left Labour Party (AL:P) held office in the Federal,State, and Municipal governments at that time). The Blade EV range (which shares some Body and safety components with Australia's largest selling small car, Hyundai. Blade has an Australian produced drive train and suspension, built to accommodate Australia's unique terrain, and urban driving conditions. Blade Vehicles fulfil similar or higher local content ratios, as the other three Australian Auto-manufacturers. Mitsubishi, subsidised by the sales of its ICE vehicles, has a huge marketing advantage in access to the Australian media. Mitsubishi, will also derive a benefit from the proposed carbon tax transfer benefit to Mitsubishi's ICE models, unavailable to Blade who produce no ICE models. With very little money and no significant government assistance, Blade have produced and marketed a creditable range of EV's, earning significant export revenue. It makes me weep, to contemplate what Blade could have become with access to the massive subsidies, investment and Government support that Th!nk attracted! Blade, like Renault, also has Battery leasing available. Blade is being ignored to death in it's own country. When the marque disappears,( as it will at this rate), the WKTEC crowd will start with the conspiracy theories. In truth, Australians would just rather buy anything, made anywhere, but from their own countrymen. To all those 12% of Australians who voted for the 'Green's' in the last election, here's the question. Why aren't you driving the Australian made Blade EV in compliance with the Greens policy of protectionism, and environmentalism? Surely, there must be one among the nearly 1.4 million of you, with the courage of your convictions? Nope? Just a deafening, and hypocritical silence
        Ben Crockett
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Marco Polo
        @Marco Polo. We have already had a discussion a previous occassions regarding our fellow Australian Blade EV, so no need to rehash old ground. What I will say is that I am going to Melbourne Motor Show tomorrow - mainly to see the Nissan Leaf in person - but will if I get a chance drop in to see Ross Blade and hopefully one of his Blade Electrons while I am in the area.
          Marco Polo
          • 4 Years Ago
          @Ben Crockett
          Good for you! Ross is a charming and interesting engineer. Very approachable and really worthwile to spend some time learning about his vehicles.
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Marco Polo
        At AUD47000 for the Blade EV, I'd suggest that people are waiting for the Nissan Leaf, Renault Fluence etc (coming to Australia in 2012) which are versatile, high quality/spec medium sized cars supported by major manufacturers for a similar price (
          Marco Polo
          • 4 Years Ago
          Hmmm..... well the Blade Electron has been available for 4 years. I would question the sincerity of the evangelistic 'green-left', who are only too quick to deride others for purchasing ICE vehicles from the big automakers, yet are quite content to wait 5 years or more, to buy imported vehicles which fall into the same category as the locally built product. Oh, and incidentally, Renault is not a well regarded manufacturer in Australia. Hyundai enjoys a far better reputation. Australia does have a vehicle building industry with a history of innovation, (in fact the ute was invented in Australia). My criticism is directed toward the hypocrisy of all those Australians who seize every opportunity to rant about the evils of GM and 'WKTEC' , but then refuse to support a local EV manufacturer. Hypocrisy! If just 1% of those Australian 'Green' party voters, purchased an EV from Blade in the last 4 years, or even supported a subsidy the equivalent of the US or UK, Blade would have gained a substantial share of the market, larger production runs, and be able to afford more competitive pricing. Where would Tesla be, if everyone had waited for a major manufacturer?
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 4 Years Ago
      I like the car. don't like the ridiculous pricing. at half the price it would still be overpriced.
        Dan Frederiksen
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        when is someone going to do it right already so we can get this bleeping show on the road!
      tantareanujellob
      • 4 Years Ago
      Thats the biggest toy car I've ever seen.
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