• Jun 28, 2011
Ford CEO Alan Mulally must have an impressive trophy room. The executive was just voted to be the 2011 CEO of the Year by a group of fellow head honchos, adding yet another honor to his already lengthy list of awards. Chief Executive Magazine readers nominated those leaders they felt deserved a tip of the hat, and the top 10 names with the most votes were then submitted to a selection committee for a final decision. This year's committee was comprised of executives leading companies ranging from Office Depot to MetLife and Ernst & Young.

Despite Ford taking a beating in this year's JD Power Initial Quality rankings due to trouble with its MyFord Touch and Sync systems, the selection committee still recognized Mulally for helping usher the automaker through some of the darkest days of domestic auto production. Last year, Mulally pulled down honors for Businessperson of the Year and he made the Motor Trend power list for 2011. We hear he's shooting for an Oscar in 2012. Hit the jump for the CEO of the Year press release.
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Ford's Alan Mulally Named 2011 CEO of the Year

Peer CEOs Vote in 26th Annual Award

GREENWICH, Conn., June 27, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Ford CEO Alan Mulally has been named "2011 Chief Executive of the Year," an honor bestowed upon an outstanding corporate leader, nominated and selected by a group of his or her peers.

"The success he showed in the face of incredible difficulty was just extraordinary," said James Turley, chairman and CEO, Ernst & Young and member of the 2011 Selection Committee. "The foresight he showed throughout the process, the courage he showed in making some tough decisions on popular brands, the global mindset he showed, and above all, the statesmanship he showed when two major competitors were on the public dole shows he was thinking for the good of the country as well as his company and industry."

"The turnaround and triumph of Ford is an amazing success story, due largely to his talents, leadership and courage," said Monsanto CEO Hugh Grant and 2010 CEO of the Year. "It's a turnaround not only of an American icon but more importantly, a global icon, as well."

"Mulally has created a leadership template for all of us to follow going forward for what growing a business in the United States is going to look like," said Christine Jacobs, CEO of Theragenics.
Nominations for CEO of the Year were garnered from among the 147,000 readers of Chief Executive magazine. The 10 most frequently cited nominations were evaluated and a winner voted upon at a meeting of a peer Selection Committee, which took place earlier this year in New York City.

Prior CEO of the Year winners include Bill Gates, Jack Welch, Michael Dell, A.G. Lafley, John Chambers, Anne Mulcahy, Larry Bossidy, Andy Grove and Herb Kelleher.

The 2011 CEO of the Year Selection Committee was comprised of Dan Glaser (CEO, Marsh), Hugh Grant (CEO, Monsanto), Fred Hassan (Chairman, Schering-Plough), William Hickey (CEO, Sealed Air), C. Robert Henrikson (CEO, MetLife), Christine Jacobs (CEO, Theragenics), Kristian P. Moor (CEO, Chartis), William R. Nuti (CEO, NCR), Steve Odland (former CEO, Office Depot), Thomas J. Quinlan III (CEO, R.R. Donnelley), Jeffrey Sonnenfeld (CEO, The Yale Chief Executive Leadership Institute), and James Turley (CEO, Ernst & Young). Tom Saporito, Chairman of RHR International, was an advisor to the Selection Committee.
Mulally's selection as 2011 CEO of the Year will be celebrated at an invitation-only event hosted by NYSE Euronext and the Chief Executive Group at the New York Stock Exchange in July.

For an exclusive interview with Alan Mulally, comments from members of the 2011 Selection Committee, a complete list of prior CEO of the Year winners and their comments on CEO leadership, please visit http://www.ChiefExecutive.net.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 23 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        Randy
        • 3 Years Ago
        Quality is actually up. The "quality" dip in JDPower is based on software glitches on optional components which is being updated freely and for a noise that a high tech transmission makes when it's breaking in. Ford is extremely high tech, software updates are needed! Give them a break! And me!!! And if someone can't handle the sound a transmission makes while its breaking-in that improves your fuel economy by a few MPGS then they're out of their mind. The sound goes away after it's done breaking in! In my opinion I would rather have a few quirks with incredible solutions than no solutions at all.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        Jarda
        • 3 Years Ago
        and here we go again, the usual scenario: 1) FoMoCo scores some well deserved points, this time quite overdue 2) Sea Urchin comes trying to look reasonable and objective while bashing FoMoCo 3) Sea Urchin gets laughed at
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Jarda
          [blocked]
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Jarda
          [blocked]
        DrEvil
        • 3 Years Ago
        You try so hard to appear to be "smart", and all you do is come across as a pompous ass who seldom knows what he's talking about. Could it POSSIBLY be that this field of CEOs being considered were American CEOs of American companies? Back to Hyundai: This company up to this point in their history in the US market (1984 - Present) has yet to make a single car that worth a damn to anyone other than the original buyer. FACT: People buy Hyundai(s) because it is usually the most car you can get at a particular price point for the money. Their cars have no soul, panache, or raw appeal. They, like Toyota, make appliances. I'm curious as to how many members there are in the Tiburon Auto club. Their cars don't age well, just wait until current Sonata turns 5 or 6 years old. Otherwise, I think Hyundai is a well run business (opinion).
          DrEvil
          • 3 Years Ago
          @DrEvil
          Urch.. Ford makes exactly three cars that I would spend money on today. Mustang GT, Raptor, Boss 302. While I like the Eco-Boost powertrains, the cars they're in are mostly mediocre. Hyundai makes exactly NONE. Yeah, I know that they have the Genesis. The Genesis has one problem, its called the Mustang GT. The powertrain in the Genesis deserves better than the "El Cheapo" suit that they stuffed it into.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @DrEvil
          [blocked]
          DrEvil
          • 3 Years Ago
          @DrEvil
          Oh! I almost forgot, congratulations to Mr. Mullaly.
          undeadMonkey93
          • 3 Years Ago
          @DrEvil
          NewTiburon.com has 34,862 members. HyundaiCoupeClub.co.uk has 3229 members. Not as much as others, but just sayin'. Also, try not to spit out the same old tired clich├ęs about East Asia and Hyundai.
          DrEvil
          • 3 Years Ago
          @DrEvil
          UndeadMonkey: Sure it does in your very dead Auto industry. 90% of you Brits cannot afford 90% of all the cars made by any British manufacturers. Oops, sorry, 100% of your auto industry is foreign owned. It's not surprising that you look up to duds like the Tiburon. I don't hate all Asian car companies, just the ones that makes refrigerators. Nissan has the GT-R, Toyota had the great Supra, Mazda has the MX-5 (even with the silly grin) and once had the Rx-7. Right now, I would kill for an original Celica or a 240Z. All great cars. Sorry if cars like the Sonata, Elantra, Accord, Lacetti, Camry just doesn't give me a chubby.
          jtav2002
          • 3 Years Ago
          @DrEvil
          I'd have to disagree with that assesment of Hyundai, DrEvil. People buying them because it's the best they could afford may have been true years ago, but hardly anymore. Most of their current lineup, specifically cars redesigned in the last couple years are all very competitive in their respective classes as far as features and pricing goes. Naturally, looks are subjective, but I think most have very attractive styling as well. You really have to wait to see what this current lineup does before making a claim that they don't age well. Prior to this current wave of Hyundai cars none were ever really particuarlly good looking to begin with.
      MAX
      • 3 Years Ago
      Steve Jobs really deserves it. Tim Cook deserves it more than Mulally. Marchionne already deserves it far more than Mulally. If one were a Lincoln dealer, one wouldn't like Mulally one bit.
        rocketmoose
        • 3 Years Ago
        @MAX
        Steve Jobs might have turned Apple around (he nearly didn't, though, there were some real underperforming products he okayed), but this is CEO of the year. And Steve did **** all during the past year.
          MAX
          • 3 Years Ago
          @rocketmoose
          That iPad thingy, I guess that didn't count.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @rocketmoose
          [blocked]
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      stanjohn123
      • 3 Years Ago
      I really think Alan Mulally deserves it. He is a good man with values. I don't care what everyone else tells here but that guy really is the best. Period.
      teamplayers99
      • 3 Years Ago
      Judging from that picture could it be that they got him confused with Mr. Rogers? Afterall, everyone loves Mr. Rogers.
      tipdrip215
      • 3 Years Ago
      He's done a good job, but as a big engine enthusiast, I kinda miss the 2004-2006 era when Ford's lineup reeked of SUVs.
      darkness
      • 3 Years Ago
      How much more $$$ does he get for that award, think of it like a all star team bonus.
      ammca66564
      • 3 Years Ago
      LEt's remember: it's not trouble, as in defects, with the MyFord thingy. It's that people have a hard time getting used to it, and what they're reporting is frustration.
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