2011 Chrysler 200 - Click above for high-res image gallery

In redesigning the Chrysler Sebring, the decision-makers at Team Pentastar wanted to give the vehicle sort of a fresh start, and opted to rename the car "200." Sure, the new 200 may look a lot like its forsaken forefather, but early returns show that the sedan and convertible have gained back a measure of respect – and sales, to boot.

But while the 200 has been an improvement, the The Detroit Bureau reports that the next-generation Chrysler mid-size sedan will not carry the numeric moniker. Chrysler and Fiat have long asserted that the long-term replacement to the 200 will feature Fiat architecture, and The Bureau says the designs are frozen and a names have already been chosen.

This doesn't mean that the 200 nameplate is history, however. If Chrysler does decide to change the name of the 200, it will lose the momentum it created for the name with the infamous Eminem Super Bowl commercial. Further, another new advertising campaign to introduce a new name will likely cost many millions of dollars. But if Chrysler wants to forever disassociate itself from the Sebring, changing the name one more time may be the right thing to do.


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  • 48 Comments
      MAX
      • 3 Years Ago
      200 is becoming sweet revenge for Chrysler. The 2012 Chrysler 200 will offer the new best in class 2.4L Tigershark four cylinder coupled with best in class 9 speed ZF automatics. look for the 200 to be around a for a long time after the Chrysler C-Evo car comes out.
      Steve
      • 3 Years Ago
      Another name change? No wonder no ones is loyal to the brand. Keep the damn name and make it work!!! Who thought of this idea at Chrysler/Fiat? Off with their heads!!!!!
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        • 3 Years Ago
        [blocked]
        JayH
        • 3 Years Ago
        how are they spending our tax money on anything? wasn't that LOAN recently PAID BACK? :x
      tantareanujellob
      • 3 Years Ago
      Nobody cares what their next rental car is going to be named.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      tantareanujellob
      • 3 Years Ago
      Do I care?
        Jake
        • 3 Years Ago
        @tantareanujellob
        Yes, you click on the link and bothered to create a snotty comment.
      notbendingover
      • 3 Years Ago
      "early returns show that the sedan and convertible have gained back a measure of respect – and sales" - yeah, sure. I bet 99% are going to the rental fleet...
      The T
      • 3 Years Ago
      The name "Sebring" has a lot of equity. Ford proved that it is entirely possible to successfully resurrect nameplates that had been attached to bad product. The Taurus became the 500 and has since been reattached to a successful redesign with all of the past sins forgiven. The Focus is doing well and we all know the last generation was one of the worst compact cars in the segment. Hyundai and Kia both have nameplates that were assigned to some really terrible products. Now look at the Sonata, Sportage, Elantra, etc. Chyrsler doesn't need to kill the Sebring name. Build a great, new Sebring, and people will be happy to buy it
        Synthono
        • 3 Years Ago
        @The T
        I'm not sure the Sebring name has that much equity, mostly since it's been a bit of a punchline on the Office for a while. Chrysler has got some fantastic names squirreled away, between its own history and its various acquisitions, perhaps something else is appropriate. For example, while traditionally a Dodge nameplate, I'd like to see Monaco return. Evokes the same spirit as Sebring, but Michael Scott didn't drive one.
      LilCe003
      • 3 Years Ago
      I never fully understood the constant name changes in American car companies. I believe one of the reasons that American resale value is so much lower than Japanese cars is because they never give the cars a chance to build equity. I understand then need to distance themselves from failed vehicles but come on its getting a bit ridiculous. Prime example is the Cobalt. Was there anything really wrong with that car the required a name change? Now Cobalt owners now have to deal with a hit in the cars appreciation because of their dead nameplate.
      StPeter
      • 3 Years Ago
      0 comments = who cares?
      Justin Campanale
      • 3 Years Ago
      I think the LC(the shortened LX utilized by the Challenger) would be a better choice for the 200 replacement, especially since they said that they want to compete with Buick and Acura. "New Yorker" would be a nice name for the 200 replacement.
        tantareanujellob
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Justin Campanale
        Nobody cares what you think.
          Justin Campanale
          • 3 Years Ago
          @tantareanujellob
          Oh, that's brilliant. Did you come up with that all by yourself?
        tantareanujellob
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Justin Campanale
        Just because you work for chrysler doesn't mean anybody cares what you think. Hertz called, they need more shitboxes. Get to work.
          Justin Campanale
          • 3 Years Ago
          @tantareanujellob
          Isn't this a fun game? Let's all accuse people of working for Chrysler when they simply make ancomment supporting them. The intelligence on this blog is really starting to get on my nerves. In AB alone, so far I've been accused of working for Chrysler, GM, VW, and Hyundai.
        joejoe509
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Justin Campanale
        Eh... Maybe with all this "Imported from Detroit" advertising going on, maybe it should be called the "Detroiter". haha I'm totally joking. :-)
      erhcanadian
      • 3 Years Ago
      They did the same thing with the 300. They rebadged the FWD Eagle Vision / Dodge Intrepid / Chrysler Concorde as the Chrysler 300M in 1998.
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