• Jun 24, 2011
2011 Porsche Boxster Spyder – Click above for high-res image gallery

We're big fans of Porsche's Boxster and Cayman, and it appears we're not alone. Porsche is celebrating 300,000 Cayman and Boxster models sold, almost exactly 15 years after the first roadster left the Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen plant in Germany. The lion's share of those sports cars have been convertibles – the hard-hatted Cayman didn't join the party until 2005 as a 2006 model.

To put an exclamation point on production vehicle number 300,000, Porsche went all-out by building a Boxster Spyder with Platinum Silver paint and Carrera red leather interior. The undoubtedly hot ride will go to a lucky customer in Germany.

With a classy design and peerless handling, we're not at all surprised that Porsche has sold 300,000 copies of its mid-engined Boxster and Cayman. Hit the jump to read over Porsche's press release.
Show full PR text
ATLANTA – June 22, 2011 – A nice round number to celebrate the birthday: Almost 15 years to the month after production began, the Porsche Boxster, together with its sister model, the Cayman, exceeded the 300,000 mark for the number of vehicles built. With its timeless attractiveness, this two-seat, mid-engine Porsche design has what it takes to make yet another sports car icon. To mark the anniversary, a Boxster Spyder with Platinum Silver metallic finish and Carrera red natural leather interior trim will roll off the Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen production line in June, destined for a customer in Germany.

There are solid reasons for this long-standing success: The Boxster and Cayman are continuously developed based on a meticulous mid-engine concept and are therefore deemed to set the standard for sports cars of their class. In the important export market of the United States, this is the tenth year that they have been ranked among the "10 Best" vehicles by Car and Driver Magazine and occupy second and third place in Germany as the vehicles that hold their value the best, hot on the heels of the 911.

The Boxster's origins testify to the typical Porsche blend of capability, courage and farsightedness. In the economically challenging times of the early 1990's, the company decided to go onto the offensive and unveiled the classic mid-engine roadster concept at the 1993 Detroit Motor Show. In its design language, the show car was reminiscent of the 356 No. 1 and the 550 Spyder. The overwhelming public response clinched the decision to proceed to series production of the Boxster, which began in the summer of 1996, and introduced as a 1997 model.

Dynamic lines, outstanding performance and an attractive price quickly catapulted the mid-engine sports car onto the bestseller list while attracting new customers to Porsche. To put the successful concept on a broader stage, Porsche also developed a Coupe based on the open-topped, two-seater roadster that made its world debut at the 2005 IAA Frankfurt Motor Show as the Cayman. The enormous demand resulted in the Boxster and Cayman being built at Valmet Automotive in Finland in addition to Zuffenhausen.

The model range currently comprises the four open-topped variants, the Boxster, Boxster S, Boxster S Black Edition and Boxster Spyder. These are complemented by the Cayman, Cayman S, Cayman S Black Edition and Cayman R Coupes.
The engine variants for the two model lines range between 255 hp and 330 hp thanks to Porsche Intelligent Performance fuel consumption is rated as high as 29 MPG highway.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      Ryan
      • 3 Years Ago
      Ok, about the photo of the latch for the top. This may be stupid and pointless but why does it say on the airbag warning label that children should sit in the back seat when this thing doesn't even have a back seat?
        Jonathan Arena
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Ryan
        What it says is "the back seat is always the safest place for children", which in this case means, "leave them at home". They probably use the same sticker for 911's.
      tantareanujellob
      • 3 Years Ago
      Too bad they put such crap engines in them. I bet more than half of the pre 2003 cars are already off the road.
        airchompers
        • 3 Years Ago
        @tantareanujellob
        Crap engines? In comparison to what exactly? Honda inline-4s and Nissan V6s and small block Chevy V8s? Yes, they break and there was that rear main seal problem, but if you change your oil and know what's going on in a car they're pretty good engines.
          rtkewley
          • 3 Years Ago
          @airchompers
          I believe the OPs comment refers to the IMS (intermediate shaft) failures that occur on the M96 engine, which is common to the 996 era 911 as well as the Boxster/Cayman. The IMS is encapsulated - it is packed with grease, not lubricated by the engine oil. Porsche revised the IMS a couple of times, but neither one fixed the problem. It took the aftermarket to come up with a successful fix, which, given Porsche's reputation for engineering, and that the M96 was in production for over a decade, is frankly inexcusable. Because Porsche addressed the problem (at least for original owners) by replacing the engine, the actual failure rate is not known - it's significant, but it certainly isn't half. Porsche's current generation boxer engine does not have an IMS - coincidence?
        jaazani
        • 3 Years Ago
        @tantareanujellob
        The engines were not really crap its just that everything now advanced so freaking fast. 200 hp ten years ago = 500 HP now.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @jaazani
          [blocked]
        arcoril
        • 3 Years Ago
        @tantareanujellob
        The Porsche M96 engines from the 996 and 986 were known for grenading because of poor intermediate shaft (IMS) bearings. I was in the market for a 986 Boxster S a few years back, but horror stories about these failures steered me away. I ended up going with an S2000 instead, and I'm pretty happy with my decision. I do love mid-engined Porsches, though, and I can still picture a Cayman S in my future since the new direct injected engines seem much more reliable.
        slap
        • 3 Years Ago
        @tantareanujellob
        So, do the 2004+ cars have the "fixed" or a different engine?
          Jonathan Arena
          • 3 Years Ago
          @slap
          They revised the design of the IMS and it has had signifigantly fewer problems if any. Keep in mind we are talking about a very small percentage of these cars by normal industry standards, even during the 'worst' years.