• Jun 16, 2011
1935 Bugatti Type 57 Grand Raid Roadster by Carrosserie Worblaufen – Click above for high-res image gallery

Few classics possess the same level of mystique as the Bugatti Type 57. But while it may be the Atlantic that draws all the attention, every 57 is a special specimen unto itself. This one especially.

One of only ten Grand Raid Roadsters to be built, this was one of just two that featured custom coachwork – from its swoopy art deco panels and covered wheels to its rumble seat – by Switzerland's Carrosserie Worblaufen. The car was completed just in time for the 1935 Concours d'Elegance at Montreux where it won first prize.

Seven decades later, after a comprehensive restoration, it won second prize at the 2005 Pebble Beach concours, and now it's going back to Monterey where RM Auctions has it up for grabs in August with pre-sale estimates placing its value at over $1 million. Take a closer look at it in our high-resolution gallery.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      miketim1
      • 3 Years Ago
      WIN .
      TokyoRemix
      • 3 Years Ago
      Oh my God. ...never liked the Veyron much, but you can't say it doesn't have pedigree. LOOK at that thing.
        Robin
        • 3 Years Ago
        @TokyoRemix
        Of course your can say the Veyron doesn't have pedigree. Bugatti now and Bugatti then have a badge in common and not much else...
      Redline
      • 3 Years Ago
      What a beauty.
      Dissident
      • 3 Years Ago
      Why can't/doesn't makes cars that still look like this? (well, short of maybe Morgan)
        Ducman69
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dissident
        Because they have the aerodynamics of a barn door, not only causing a lot of drag but often quite a bit of lift at 80mph+ which is a safety issue at high speed, and if the shape doesn't crash well at both low and high speeds then insurance rates will be through the roof. That bumper likely wouldn't pass 5mph crash tests w/o serious damage to the vehicle, wouldn't pass pedestrian safety crash tests at low speed in Europe, and at high speed it probably folds like a tin can w/o a strong unibody protecting passengers in a rollover.
        Ducman69
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dissident
        Not to mention, notice the lack of head support for the passengers. In a rear crash, the whiplash would likely be enough to cause death as the seat support appears to end at your mid-back. End result is that cars today look so similar not due to lack of designer creativity, but due to limitations of currently available technology to meet government safety and efficiency regulations. Pure electric vehicles may give quite a bit more flexibility with battery packs that can be integrated into any floor and compact electric motors that don't have the cooling and emissions equipment needs of today's ICE. :)
      MattGMD
      • 3 Years Ago
      That front bumper looks too fragile to protect the car in a crash, no matter at what speed. However, it's probably sufficient for protecting that huge grille from an errant pedestrian.
      rsholland
      • 3 Years Ago
      Seat belts? Not on a 1935 car, no matter how great it is...
      Talvin Choan
      • 1 Year Ago
      simply marvellous
      VVhistler
      • 3 Years Ago
      Hah, at first I thought that was a cotter pin for the front hubcaps.