• Jun 16th 2011 at 7:47PM
  • 17
Green GT LMPH2 – Click above to watch video after the jump

As part of the "Le Mans vers le Futur" (Le Mans Towards the Future) vehicle demonstration, the Green GT 300 kW racer and a number of other avant-garde cars were displayed during the 2011 edition of 24 Hours of Le Mans and did some laps around the famed French course. Next year, Green GT will circle the course for real with a new experimental prototype, the hydrogen-powered LMPH2.

The Swiss outfit has been invited by the ACO (Automobile Club de l'Ouest) to race as an experimental car in the 2012 Le Mans and will opt for hydrogen to store the needed energy in lieu of batteries only. The first version is expected to be completed this Fall and will have 100 kW (134 horse power) on tap while the final 300 kW (402 hp) machine should be completed in time for the event.

Le Mans-experienced driver Christian Pescatori will take the wheel for the development program. You can check out his skills after the break in a video featuring him tackling the track during the Le Mans vers le Futur in the current 300 kW battery-powered Green GT and read the official press release. As a bonus, we've thrown in footage of the same car and driver combo taking on the circuit that hosted the Grand Prix de Pau Electrique.

[Source: Green GT]
Show full PR text
Le Mans, June 9, 2011 – The Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO) announced at its press conference today the invitation of the GreenGT LMP H2, as an experimental car to race at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 2012.

Founded in 2008, GreenGT is a proactive and independent company, which conceives and markets clean and sustainable propulsion systems, applied to racing and innovation. This invitation by the ACO rewards three years of GreenGT's pioneering work in the field of high performance sustainable mobility.

After the GreenGT Sprint (2009), the Citroën Servile (2010) and the GreenGT 300 (2011), the Swiss GreenGT company has started the build of a LMP H2 prototype to race at the 2012 24 Hours of Le Mans. Based on an LMP chassis, the GreenGT LMP H2 will be fueled by hydrogen and integrate its own onboard power plant.

Considering the efficiencies of thermal and electric motors, a mere 150 g of hydrogen are enough to replace one liter of gasoline. The GreenGT LMP H2 will have 12 kg of hydrogen in 700 bar high-pressure tanks on board. Hydrogen can be produced by solar energy. When it feeds a fuel cell, it combines with the ambient oxygen to produce electricity and only steam is released to the atmosphere. Thus racing with hydrogen can be fully carbon neutral.

GreenGT will present a first version of its LMP H2, with a 100kW fuel cell on board, in autumn of 2011. A 300kW fuel cell version will follow. Christian Pescatori (6 times Le Mans driver, 2 times 2nd and winner of Sebring with Audi R8) will be the development driver
The GreenGT LMP H2 will have all safety devices that GreenGT ahs already developed throughout its other three cars. The unique and patented GreenGT drive train, which is capable of torque vectoring, will see a Le Mans evolution from a technical standpoint.
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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 17 Comments
      Dave D
      • 4 Years Ago
      Freakin awesome video clip of the laps at Le Mans!!! but....You guys do realize the car currently is an EV, not an H2 car and those laps are being driven by batteries alone? Of course, the problem with the BEV is you'll get about 3 laps before you have to stop and recharge/swap the batteries with today's battery tech. Of course, the H2 can solve that problem but presents another: power. It will be interesting to see if they can get the power density they need from a fuel cell that they can get into that thing. I honestly wish them luck because there are cases where a FCV fits the bill, and this may be one of them.
      Doug
      • 4 Years Ago
      Hmm.. so will this run on H2 that is a cryogenic liquid or a compressed gas. If it's compressed gas, it may actually be faster to do a battery swap than an H2 fill up at the pit. I suppose it's possible to swap compressed gas tanks, but that seems a bit risky.
        letstakeawalk
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Doug
        Switching a H2 tank would be pretty simple, but since refilling takes only a few minutes, it's unlikely switching the whole tank would be any faster.
          Doug
          • 4 Years Ago
          @letstakeawalk
          I said in a pit, as in a race situation. A few minutes is too long.
          letstakeawalk
          • 4 Years Ago
          @letstakeawalk
          This is LeMans we're talking about. Speed is important in the pits, but spending several minutes on a pit stop is quite common. The length of the pit stop can be negated if the car can spend more laps on the track between pits, for a reduced total number of stops. The hydrogen tanks have greater energy density than batteries, so they pack more energy to be used, which means fewer stops compared to a BEV. LeMans isn't about crossing the finish line first, it's about covering greater distance than your competitors - a distinct advantage that FCVs have over BEVs.
        Dave D
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Doug
        I don't know about that. Ian was talking about a Chrysler program back in the early 90's. I can't find any details on this one yet as to what type of H2 it is using and the storage methods.
          Chris M
          • 4 Years Ago
          @Dave D
          Well, if it is 12 Kg of compressed H2, that means they are using much larger tanks than the H2 FCV prototypes made for street-legal use. Most of the H2 FC cars store 4 to 5 Kg of H2 in their tanks. But being a custom made racer, they can disregard passenger space and trunk space and dedicate much more space for that bulky fuel. With that large of a tank, they probably won't need to refuel at all during the race. For a racer like that, they can mostly disregard issues of cost, overall efficiency, and space requirements. For street legal cars for sale to the public, such issues become major problems.
          Dave D
          • 4 Years Ago
          @Dave D
          Chris, For an endurance race like Le Mans, they will probably have to refuel a number of times. I know from working with Panoz that they get about 20% of their normal street MPG while racing at Le Mans. A good H2 car seems to be able to get 60+m/kg so with a 12kg tank they'd be in the 750 mile range for street driving and about 150 miles at Le Mans. This years winners covered nearly 3000miles so we're talking about 20 stops or so. Clearly, just some very rough estimates, but good enough for back of the envelope. With decent use of regen braking, they would do better than the 20% that ICE cars get in terms of efficiency compared to EVs. So hopefully they could get more like 30%+ compared to normal driving. They also have a 60kph speed limit on pit lane so eliminating a few pit stops might make up for any difference in fueling speeds and I think the H2 could be fairly close in fueling rate to diesel/petrol anyway. Considering that they are already limiting the diameter of the fueling hoses on the diesels to give petrol cars a chance, they could probably do something to make an H2 fill up competitive.
          letstakeawalk
          • 4 Years Ago
          @Dave D
          "The GreenGT LMPH2 will incorporate all of the safety features found in the company’s previous models and will be built on an LMP chassis. It will be fueled by 12 kg of hydrogen in 700 bar high-pressure tanks which are on board the vehicle. This hydrogen will be fed into a fuel cell, and when combined with oxygen, will produce electricity to run the racer. The only emissions escaping it will be steam so the LMPH2 will be fully carbon neutral." http://www.topspeed.com/cars/greengt-lmph2/ke3881.html
      Ian Sharp
      • 4 Years Ago
      The Chrysler Patriot Hybrid Race car, was designed in 1992 to initially race on LNG (Cryogenic cooled) to obtain the energy density of the fuel to be competitive. Once the engineering had been understood of handing of the Cryogenic fuel it was planned that Hydrogen or "slush" hydrogen would have been substituted, and from thence on once the cryogenic issues resolved, liquid Hydrogen and liquid Oxygen for Fuel Cell use. Fudementally it was a stepped program to get to a fuel cell vehicle at Le Mans.
        Chris M
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Ian Sharp
        What the heck do you mean by "slush hydrogen"? Are you talking about a slushy mixture of liquid H2 and solid hydrocarbons, or a slushy mixture of liquid and frozen H2? If the former, you're referring to an impractical and difficult to handle fuel, if the latter you have no idea of how cold a temperature would be needed, or how impractical and difficult to handle it would be.
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 4 Years Ago
      an F hydrogen is dead
      EJ
      • 4 Years Ago
      Sure wish I could get those OZ wheels for my Leaf, and the 300kW wouldn't suck either...
      Smith Jim
      • 4 Years Ago
      OMG, When are people going to learn? http://www.physorg.com/news85074285.html
        Chris M
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Smith Jim
        Somehow, I don't think race car makers or drivers are particularly concerned about efficiency, or even costs. This effort is basically to show off new technology, not necessarily to prove the technology is good for everyday street legal vehicles.
        paulwesterberg
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Smith Jim
        Actually most cheap hydrogen is made from reformed natural gas.
        Dave
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Smith Jim
        You don't make hydrogen from electricity unless there is no other way available. Hydrogen is best made from nuclear or solar heat energy or from biomass directly without wasting energy by making electricity first.
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