LightSquared Boeing 702hp satellite

The ongoing spat between a company known as LightSquared and a number of high-profile combatants including the Defense Department, the Federal Aviation Administration, John Deere and General Motors' OnStar service continues unabated.

The Federal Communications Commission, which has to approve of the company's proposed broadband network, has placed LightSquared under some tight deadlines and has asked the company and its many detractors to put together a joint report on how to proceed with the network without interfering with GPS systems already in place.

In a series of 46 tests performed by the National Executive Committee for Space-Based Positioning, Navigation & Timing, the LightSqaured service disrupted communications from both OnStar and GPS devices used by the likes of the U.S. military.

GM and its OnStar subsidiary believes a workaround is possible. Says OnStar spokesperson Vijay Iyer, "We'd love to be part of that testing and validation and we believe there is potential mitigation solutions specifically geared toward that bandwidth that's being used out there."

Assuming these companies and agencies can all get their issues worked out, LightSquared hopes to have its service commercially available to 100 million subscribers by 2012. A series of hearings on the matter have been announced for June 23rd by two subcommittees from the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. Stay tuned.