2012 Honda Civic Hybrid – Click above for high-res image gallery

Though its miles per gallon rating rings in at 44/44/44 (that's city/highway/combined), the all-new 2012 Honda Civic Hybrid is still no match at the pump for the third-generation, 51/48/50 mpg Toyota Prius that debuted as a 2010 model year vehicle. Sure, the 2012 Civic Hybrid is more fuel-efficient than its predecessor, but it doesn't trump the Prius, and that's a shame considering that the new Honda hybrid now packs a sophisticated lithium-ion battery pack and a reworked electric motor that's more powerful than the old unit.

So far, sales of the 2012 Civic Hybrid have been rather sluggish (Honda reports that sales hit 389 through the end of May). That's due in part to the vehicle's limited availability because of quake-related supply issues. However, with a sticker price that starts at $24,800, the 2012 Civic Hybrid is $1,920 more than a base Prius, which begs the question: can Honda's costlier hybrid – one that's not even as fuel efficient as the Toyota – actually compete?


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  • 98 Comments
      philippejentsch
      • 3 Years Ago
      aging? the 2010 Prius is aging?
      Jeff
      • 3 Years Ago
      Autoblog states: "with a sticker price that starts at $24,800, the 2012 Civic Hybrid is $1,920 more than a base Prius" You may want to double check your facts.... Prius II (base) is only $ 540 less expensive than the Civic Hybrid per the Honda & Toyota websites including destination. Civic Hybrid: $24820 (includes $770 destination) Prius II: $24280 (includes $760 destination)
        Rick
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Jeff
        So the Prius is still cheaper and more efficient, correct? Honda fail. Why introduce a vehicle that can barely compete much less lead the class?
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Jeff
        [blocked]
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      founerra
      • 3 Years Ago
      the stupidity, it burns!
      ROB
      • 3 Years Ago
      It is not as ugly as a Prius.
      Pentium
      • 3 Years Ago
      I still hate Prius so much....
        Mark Miller
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Pentium
        That's cause youre a moron.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Pentium
        [blocked]
          rocketmoose
          • 3 Years Ago
          Why would I be envious of such an anaemic, slow, poor handling disaster of a car? If the utmost fuel economy is your cup of tea, fine. Fun is also a feature I desire and thus I don't hate the Prius out of envy, rather, I hate it because it's boring.
          Snowdog
          • 3 Years Ago
          Some hate is legit. Like my hate of this horrid comment system. Cripes even Engadgets is better than this. This is by far the worse comment system of any site I have seen.
          • 3 Years Ago
          [blocked]
          dowens1617
          • 3 Years Ago
          Prius is nothing like LeBron James. Prius is reliable, and truly dominate in its market.
        axiomatik
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Pentium
        I find it very sad that people "hate" a particular car. If it doesn't appeal to you, fine, don't buy it. But why **** on other people's choices when they buy what they want?
      NightFlight
      • 3 Years Ago
      Hold on here a second, Autoblog. So what you are telling me, is a vehicle that was JUST INTRODUCED, has an extremely, EXTREMELY limited supply, and consumer's aren't familiar with it yet, is selling less than a established vehicle that had a good dealer supply already on the lots? That is news to me. /sarcasm. Seriously guys, how is this even news? Why is this even worth pointing out? It looks like flame bait from the staff.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @NightFlight
        [blocked]
      aatbloke1967
      • 3 Years Ago
      In real world driving, I average 46-48mpg (US) in my Insight except when its extremely cold, in which case those numbers drop to 42-44mpg (US). Driving at a constant 30-40mph along country roads achieves the best fuel economy, where 52-55mpg (US) is easily attained over a given journey of that ilk. It's also very light, and therefore hypermiling is very easy in the Insight. It isn't a car for everybody, but I've certainly been happy with mine and it does the job I ask of it admirably.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @aatbloke1967
        [blocked]
        poorboywrx
        • 3 Years Ago
        @aatbloke1967
        spot on, anyone actually looking and solely basing this on EPA numbers is missing out. The insight has it all over the Prius.
      Lowland
      • 3 Years Ago
      No offense but when is Honda going to make nice looking cars again?
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Lowland
        [blocked]
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Lowland
        [blocked]
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Lowland
        [blocked]
      humanloop
      • 3 Years Ago
      Funny, I have a picture in my phone of a customer's 2012 civic hybrid fuel screen.....57.7 mpg. And, he is no hypermiler. Just drives back and forth to work like everyone else. I've worked for Honda sales and service for years. I've constantly seen considerably higher mileage ratings on Hondas. Real world numbers by real world drivers, not paid authors.
        lne937s
        • 3 Years Ago
        @humanloop
        There actually is something to be said about the difference between real world and EPA test numbers. It has increasingly become the case that manufacturers are optimizing their vehicles to perform well in the test cycles. This is especially apparent with the rise in much publicized highway mileage ratings, as manufactures can optimize gear ratios to provide maximum mileage at the speeds used in the test. However, some manufacturers have not optimized to US-specific test procedures, especially with vehicles that are primarily sold in other countries, so their mileage will tend to be better than the EPA rating in the real world. For example, the Cruze is rated significantly higher than the Mazda 3, but the 3 tends to outperform it on mileage in comparision tests (e.g. Motor Trend)
          lne937s
          • 3 Years Ago
          @lne937s
          Do you own a Cruze too? In the Motor Trend comparison test I referenced, the Cruze got 23.8 mpg while the Mazda 3 2.0 touring got 27.8 mpg under the same circumstances- 4 mpg better. In Car and Driver, the 3 with the larger engine tied the Cruze for 18 mpg under the same test circumstances. If you are not impressed with your Mazda 3's fuel economy, you would be disappointed with the Cruze (especially if you thought it would do better). http://www.motortrend.com/roadtests/sedans/1107_best_selling_compact_sedan_comparison/forte_ex_and_mazda3_touring_specs.html http://www.motortrend.com/roadtests/sedans/1107_best_selling_compact_sedan_comparison/cruze_ltz_rs_and_focus_titanium_specs.html
          mitchman06
          • 3 Years Ago
          @lne937s
          @ You couldn't be any more right. I have a '10 Mazdaspeed3 and it is rated on the highway for 25MPG by the EPA. My average, AVERAGE MPG with 60/40 city/highway is 25.4 MPG. This is me calculating this the real way, and not using the onboard computer which is about .3MPG optimistic but still pretty accurate. On the highway I can easily get 30+MPG. I don't drive easy, at all, but how in the hell could the EPA be so far of with their calculations? Chevy tuned their vehicles to do very well with the EPAs test, but the real world MPGs are different. I've driven two FWD Equinoxes as rentals on long road trips that were essentially 99% highway miles and I never, ever came close to their 32MPG highway rating. I kept the speeds at around 65MPH and still, no dice. The Cruze is apparently no different unless you hypermile it which is a tactic that no one should ever use.
          nardvark
          • 3 Years Ago
          @lne937s
          Erm, I don't think the 3 outperforms the Cruze in the real world. I own a Mazda, and I know lots of Mazda3 owners. It's really not a very efficient compact. They're tuned for performance (relatively speaking), not economy.
        nardvark
        • 3 Years Ago
        @humanloop
        And someone who works for Honda sales and service is going to be objective on this matter?
          nardvark
          • 3 Years Ago
          @nardvark
          I wasn't trying to pick on you, my only point is that no one else is going to listen to a Honda service guy and think "this guy probably has a completely unbiased view on Hondas." This is actually a problem I've been thinking about a lot. It's REALLY hard to get good real-world data on fuel economy. Hazdaz and I were having a conversation about this a day or two ago. The only people who report data publicly are those who are really happy or really upset. Everyone else just moves on with their life. There are sites like fuelly.com, but those all have the same problems with self-reported data.
          humanloop
          • 3 Years Ago
          @nardvark
          Sure, why not. This comment isn't going to improve my standings, sales, or income bracket. As far as objectivity, i would consider photographic and hands on evidence as such. What's your definition of objectivity? I don't expect to change anyones opinion. I just like real data, and for people to be informed.
      GoFaster58
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'd buy the Honda on looks alone. All Toyota's are are overrated plus they are UGLY!
      Snowdog
      • 3 Years Ago
      Everytime we get any kind of comparison, some Honda Fanboy hypermilers come out and tell us they can beat the Prius fuel economy. Or claim that EPA is biased in favor of Prius. :D Consumer Reports has the best database of rigorous MPG tests and here are their overall number for the Prius, Insight, Civic Hybrid(2010): 44, 38, 37. Toyota sells a lot of Prius because they have the best fuel economy and everyone knows it. But there are other advantages, Toyotas power combiner gears are much more robust than Hondas Belt CVT. Toyota has had better battery management than Honda (good luck with that Lithium). You have to be a real fanboy to pay more money for less MPG, less cargo space, less reliablity... I don't see huge sale for the Civic Hybrid.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Snowdog
        [blocked]
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