Passing your high school courses and passing your driver's license test are two very different things. Though they're independent of each other now, lawmakers in some states are trying to tie the two together. Certain states are examining legislation that would bar high school drop-outs from getting a driver's license.

States including Georgia, Massachusetts, Texas, New York and Michigan, are in favor of these anti-drop measures. The idea behind the proposed laws is that kids would be more likely to stay in school if the privilege of driving an automobile were at stake. Other states, like California, Illinois, Florida and Ohio don't see things the same way. Those against the laws argue that parents are ultimately the ones who should be in charge of revoking driving privileges, not the state.

What say you? Should the drop-outs be banned from driving, or is this a case of the government crossing the line? Sound off in the comments, and be sure to answer the poll below.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 140 Comments
      Gribble
      • 3 Years Ago
      I hope the people who are in favor of this type of thing consider that many drop-outs leave school because they must get a job to support their family. I had a friend in high school who dropped out because his mother was became terminally ill and was unable to work and provide for him and his 2 brothers. If he had been denied a driver's license, he would have been unable to work at his (decent paying) job. Instead of supporting his family and being a productive, tax paying member of society, his family would have been forced into poverty.
        OptimusPrimeRib
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Gribble
        I agree with you. The same thing happened to one of my class mates. He was a straight A student with a lot of potential and unfortunately his father ended up in jail. In order to live and take care of his family he had to drop out and get a job. Why does society automatically associate a dropout as a criminal and a loser? How come society never asks if it fails its people?
        You guy
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Gribble
        I wouldn't ban them outright, they just would have to take a private drivers ed course... which generally costs about 3-5x what the public school fees are.
          Gribble
          • 3 Years Ago
          @You guy
          Why? Most states don't require a driver's ed course, and my state (MO) doesn't even offer one in public schools. Also, doing this still makes it much more difficult for someone in a situation like I described above to do what is necessary to support their family.
      baconpocket
      • 3 Years Ago
      these two issues should be kept entirely separate. the problems with each are complicated enough without intertwining them. keeping kids in school is a noble cause that should be addressed some other way. additionally i think knowledge and skills tests for getting a license should be harder.
      cashsixeight
      • 3 Years Ago
      THUMBS UP for MCLOVIN!!!!!!!!!!!!
      Marc
      • 3 Years Ago
      Florida teens who drop out of school have their driving privilege suspended until they are 18. Has been this way for almost 20 years. Parents/guardians can take a license away from a 17 or under driver at any time for any reason. When this law first was enacted, it caused a lot drops out to get their GEDs.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      matthewcollin71@gmail.com
      I know a few people that have dropped out of high school for very reasons, whether it be personal mistakes or just being dealt a bad hand in life. BUT, they all went out and got jobs at real young ages, and eventually received their GED's and a few of them college degrees. Point is, how are you going to tell these people that are in a bad place in life that they can't even get a drivers license to go to work and support themselves/family? If they can pass the test the same as every other yahoo/horrible driver out there, then that's all that matters.
      ju12zo
      • 3 Years Ago
      I dropped out of high school to get a job (and because I just straight sucked at school), with out my license and car I would not have been able to work. Currently I am in a better situation job wise than most of the people I know from high school because I started the grunt work earlier to get a leg up. Stay in school kids, I am the exception not the rule
      feralchimp
      • 3 Years Ago
      My wife dropped out of high school, and she's both smarter and a better driver than you. So if you answered "Yes, absolutely" in the poll, I cordially invite you to go **** yourself with a government rake. Alternatively, go get run over by some douchebag in a 335 who got straight A's in high school, went on to the Ivy League, and is now weaving through traffic with a bluetooth headset in his ear.
        Gribble
        • 3 Years Ago
        @feralchimp
        I believe you. Of the people I know personally, the ones who dropped out of high school are almost universally more intelligent than my friends who graduated.
      Agilis
      • 3 Years Ago
      I think the problem in regards to those who are voting 'Yes, Absolutely' is they are voting the obvious answer. At first glance, everyone should vote 'Yes, Absolutely' because as the article suggests, it would drive, no pun intended, high school students to want to stay in school, not drop out, and get their high school diploma if it means that accomplishment will allow them to get their license. It also makes sense that you wouldn't have delinquents partying, drunk driving, instead of being in school. And there are other obvious reasons that someone would want to vote 'Yes. Absolutely.' The problem is, it's the WRONG choice. Not everyone in high school that drops out did so because of laziness or for rebel-like reasons. As others have pointed out, some people are forced to drop out early, due to circumstances outside their control. Those who vote, 'No, definitely not' are seeing outside the box and looking at the bigger picture, something those for this law are obviously missing. Simple fact is, you cannot have a law that could fix a perfect world type scenario - It would be wonderful if every student decided to drop out because school was too tough and thus they were lazy. But the reality is, this is untrue and you are forcing those who bear the weight of trying to attend high school when life does not warrant them that privilege and in the end, punishing them. This law is both unfair and useless. The type of students this law aims to encourage to stay in high school will still drop out and will still drive, even if it's illegally. Bottom line: It is up to the student's parent(s) to decide if they should have that privilege, NOT the States!
      Matt
      • 3 Years Ago
      I am so saddened to see 38% of people willing to give the state this control. Why would anyone in their right mind think that the State should have any say in this whatsoever. As people have stated below, what happens if a kid has to drop out do to personal reasons, death in the family. Give me a break, the state needs to butt the hell out of peoples lives!
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Michael Campasini
      • 3 Years Ago
      come on you got to be kidding me? this is just more government control.
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