• 22
Evatran's Plugless Power system

Evatran – developer of the Plugless Power plug-in vehicle inductive charging system – and Yazaki North America – a Tier 1 automotive supplier that specializes in electrical distribution systems and connectivity solutions – have signed a joint development agreement aimed at quickly commercializing Plugless Power technology.

Under terms of the agreement, Evatran and Yazaki will team up to complete the development of a hands-free charging system to be used in residential, commercial and industrial applications. As the Plugless Power name implies, this system will eliminate the need to plug in to recharge a vehicle's battery. Evatran has chosen to team with a Tier 1 automotive supplier in hopes that it can pitch its Plugless Power technology to automakers as either a factory- or dealer-installed option.

The Plugless Power system utilizes induction technology to transfer up to 3.3 kilowatts of power at efficiencies of up to 90 percent, allowing plug-in vehicles to recharge as quickly as they would with some Level 2 conductive (wired) chargers.

[Source: Yazaki North America | Image: Sebastian Blanco / AOL]
Show full PR text
Yazaki North America, Inc. and Evatran Partner to Bring Plugless Power™ to Electric Vehicles

Joint Development Agreement signed to commercialize "hands-free" EV recharging technology


Wytheville, VIRGINIA – June 1, 2011 Evatran, the developer of the Plugless Power™ electric vehicle (EV) inductive recharging system, and Yazaki North America have signed a Joint Development Agreement to develop and market Plugless Power™ technology to automotive manufacturers as a factory or dealership option. With joint resources, Evatran and Yazaki are developing a hands-free charging system to be used in residential, commercial, and industrial applications, eliminating the need to "plug in" to recharge the vehicle's battery.

Charging with the Plugless Power™ system is as simple as parking the EV above the floor-mounted parking pad. The solution utilizes proven, induction technology to create a convenient wireless charging system designed specifically for the high-power EV application. The Plugless Power™ technology transfers up to 3.3kW of power, the level required by most electric vehicle models, at efficiencies above 90 percent, ensuring that vehicles recharge as quickly as with traditional plug-in methods.

"This partnership guarantees that our technology will have the highest level of design reviews, performance testing, and vehicle integration engineering," said Rebecca Hough, Executive Vice President of Sales and Product Development at Evatran. "Yazaki's experience in the automotive industry will ensure our vision for a simple, convenient EV recharging solution comes to fruition."

Jim Romine, Executive Vice President of Engineering at Yazaki North America said, "Yazaki is proud to be one of the first suppliers committed to assessing and commercializing new technologies for our customers, with a specific focus on sustainable initiatives and hybrid electric vehicles. We look forward to using our technical expertise in the automotive sector to bring this technology to the emerging electric vehicle market."

Yazaki North America is a Tier 1 automotive supplier with headquarters in Canton, Mich., and is a subsidiary of Yazaki Corporation with headquarters in Tokyo, Japan. As the world's largest supplier of automotive electrical distribution systems (EDS), Yazaki has been at the forefront of the electric vehicle market since its inception with years of experience in high voltage system integration and development. Yazaki supplies products to vehicle manufacturers worldwide with a product portfolio that includes an SAE J1772™ compliant Charge Coupler and assembly along with electrical components for hybrid vehicles.

About Yazaki

Yazaki Corporation is a global leader in the research, development and delivery of vehicle power and data solutions for vehicle applications. Yazaki produces electrical distribution systems, Vehicle Information Products, solid-state power centers, connection systems and electronics. Worldwide, the company employs nearly 200,000 people in 39 countries. Yazaki has been committed to the preservation of the environment for over 70 years. The company continues this commitment today through the development of advanced electric components for hybrid electric vehicles, the promotion of recycling and the efficient use of resources. For more information about Yazaki North America, Inc. and its vision for a greener tomorrow, log onto www.yazaki-na.com.

About Evatran
Plugless Power™ (www.pluglesspower.com), manufactured by Evatran™, is the first electric vehicle (EV) charging system on the market to offer customers a simple way to charge their EVs with the ease of hands-free, automatic technology. Utilizing inductive technology, which has been used in electrical transformers for more than 100 years, Plugless Power streamlines the charging of electric vehicles by eliminating the nuisance of the cord and the plug. For more information, visit www.pluglesspower.com.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 22 Comments
      Paul Allen
      • 4 Years Ago
      "Efficiencies of up to 90 percent" really means: For every $100 of electricity you pay for, your car will receive up to $90 worth, and the rest will disappear. Really bad idea.
        letstakeawalk
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Paul Allen
        Many people will likely decide the convenience is worth a few extra pennies a day.
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Paul Allen
        Sorry, this ended up in the wrong place due to the mysteries of the comments system: There is no evidence that inductive charging is less efficient than by wire, where you have losses due to heating the wire etc. Here is the Rav 4 EV, where there were both inductive and wire versions: 'Battery and charger efficiencies are determined by dividing the energy removed from the battery (measured in DC kWh) by the energy used to fully charge the battery (as AC kWh). The conductive and inductive vehicles averaged 83.9% and 83.6% efficiency respectively' http://www.evchargernews.com/miscfiles/sce-rav4ev-100k.pdf Of course modern versions are actually magnetic resonant, not pure inductive, ie there is no physical contact, but just the same you are assuming too much.
        letstakeawalk
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Paul Allen
        At any rate, you'd have to compare ratings between specific chargers - there's always going to be some loss. This Georgia Power site assumes 85% eff. for a level 2 charger, and only 68% eff. for level 1. http://www.georgiapowerco.com/electricvehicles/getting_ready.asp
          JakeY
          • 5 Months Ago
          @letstakeawalk
          I don't think the financial loss is that much either, but the environmental impact does matter. I think throwing away 10% or more of your energy for a little convenience isn't that good an idea. Automakers struggle to squeeze just a couple percent more efficiency from their cars, and wireless charging will easily throw all that work away.
          JakeY
          • 5 Months Ago
          @letstakeawalk
          Charging efficiency is a completely different matter (that depends on your on-board charger). You'll lose 10% or more on top of what you lose already using your on-board charger. On the other hand, the losses through a typical charging cable is negligible.
          Joeviocoe
          • 5 Months Ago
          @letstakeawalk
          90% efficient SOUNDS great. But that assumes nearly perfect distance and alignment. 1) The old induction charge paddles were still physically inserted by the driver into a slot on the car. The distance between coils were mere millimeters and only separated by a plastic gap. 2) These convenience, drive over, types will be VERY difficult to align. *Unless you add the extra cost and bulk of motors to self align the coils. 3) The distance is much greater. Yes, magnetic resonance makes this a lot more efficient across large air gaps. But the downside *which the companies who want to pitch this to automakers NEVER talk about* is this: Any metal in the surrounding area of the coils (BOTH on the charger/floor AND the receiver/undercarriage) would cause energy to be lost. GREATER than the already claimed 10% loss. The only way to maximize efficiency to 90%... is to completely re-engineer the EV so that the receiving coils are no where near any metal components of the car. You talk about people willing to spend a few pennies a day for the convenience... Sure, I get that. But the real cost is NOT from the charger losses... or even the cost of the ground transmitter... but from the EV's receiver system. Adding another couple of thousand of dollars to an already expensive vehicle will NOT be wise at this time. When EVs reach their next generation... you may start to see this. But right now, this technology is a bit "ahead of it's time".
          letstakeawalk
          • 5 Months Ago
          @letstakeawalk
          Thanks, I forgot that aspect. We're still talking pennies on the dollar in terms of cost difference.
      KenZ
      • 4 Years Ago
      Like many others, why would I throw away 10% of my power, other than make the world's least efficient garage heater? But another thing could be.. you drive home with a friend... pull into the garage... and they die, because they have a pacemaker. Nice.
        Joeviocoe
        • 5 Months Ago
        @KenZ
        Hope you were just joking. But in case you weren't. Pacemakers in the last 10 years are much less susceptible to interference. Your cell phone is a bigger threat than an inductive charger.
      Timo
      • 4 Years Ago
      Point of that charger is that you can bolt it into ground in places like parking lots and even streets where people park their cars. No cables to steal, no poles to break, no fuss of any kind. I don't care if I lose some small amount of energy to inefficiencies if that means that I can get car charged while I do grocery shopping.
      JakeY
      • 5 Months Ago
      Yes, socket losses are probably higher than the negligible pure wire losses (which I forgot to mention I calculated assuming 25 feet of #8 wire, with 3.3kW/15 amp power). However, given the sockets were designed for over 10k insertions/removals, I doubt it is much higher, if at all, even with wear (the socket itself has to handle even higher current than the wire, given it has to work for the max of the J1772 spec, instead of the max of the specific EVSE). As for the Wampfler link, they have no solid data at all, not even a percentage loss estimate. The gist of their argument is with wireless charging, you can get away with lower power/current charging (since you presumably can charge more often), which may mean higher efficiency. I doubt that argument: a couple of seconds to plug in a cable isn't going to stop you from charging if you reached a charging point and will stop there for long enough to get a noticeable charge. And again, what you save in wire losses over the 25 feet of cable is negligible (not to mention you still need to wire up the charging pad anyways). Judging from the RAV4 EV data, the difference between an inductive paddle (where the coils are almost touching) and a socket is negligible, but from what I can see, something with a couple inches of air gap is going to have significant losses.
      Spec
      • 4 Years Ago
      I appreciate the technology of these systems but they are really not needed. They should be an option for high-purchasers. The last thing EVs need is extra technology that adds to the cost. Plugging in a car takes about 10 seconds. The only problem is if you forget to plug in and that is largely remedied by phone applications that can send an alert to the EV owner if they forgot to plug in before bed time.
        Giyad
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Spec
        its being developed in conjunction, i think its fine they're doing this and i think you will be very happy when you don't need to plug things in anymore
          • 5 Months Ago
          @Giyad
          With all the concerns about conservation and unlugging phone chargers not in use (vampire power) this flies in the face of those efforts. Installing a known inefficiency and power waster just to save 10 seconds of convenience is stupid.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I don't care for any wireless devices. Unsound inventions. Nothing like losing more power to further inefficiency at the same time as creating another potential way to get cancer/tumors.. The only reason wireless power should ever be in use is if something is in the air.. For example nasa beaming power to a satellite/station. Since then it is cost feeable instead of grounding and reputing something into orbit. How hard is it to use a plug really? Lazy lazy lazy.
      JakeY
      • 5 Months Ago
      The inductive charging there used wired paddles which have almost no distance between two coils. The charger in the article has an air gap of at least a couple of inches. Looking at the data there was negligible losses for both the conductive and inductive charger in the RAV4EV. http://avt.inel.gov/pdf/fsev/sce_rpt/rav499condreport.pdf http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/avta/pdfs/fsev/sce_rpt/rav4_ind_report.pdf The article points out your lose 10% or more just from this wireless charging. I've calculated losses with the #8 wire used by J1772 sockets and came up with 0.1% loss.
      wardialer
      • 4 Years Ago
      they gotta put some pegs around the perimeter so that young skateboarders don't attempt the latest grinds from the latest tony hawk video game to impress their young skateboarding pals and attract eager sponsors. i just don't want to see anyone get hurt... especially in this economy, with obamacare still in its infancy.
        • 5 Months Ago
        @wardialer
        There is no evidence that inductive charging is less efficient than by wire, where you have losses due to heating the wire etc. Here is the Rav 4 EV, where there were both inductive and wire versions: 'Battery and charger efficiencies are determined by dividing the energy removed from the battery (measured in DC kWh) by the energy used to fully charge the battery (as AC kWh). The conductive and inductive vehicles averaged 83.9% and 83.6% efficiency respectively' http://www.evchargernews.com/miscfiles/sce-rav4ev-100k.pdf Of course modern versions are actually magnetic resonant, not pure inductive, ie there is no physical contact, but just the same you are assuming too much.
      ewoden
      • 4 Years Ago
      So with all the field activity associated with indictive charging with big remote sources, should there be a concern for the effects on a nearby garaged ICE vehicle's ECM? How about the EV peripheral electronics? Or the laptop/smart phone/I pad left on the seat?
      • 5 Months Ago
      Wampfler reckon losses from inductive and wire charging are similar - they have been running inductive in buses in Italy for years: 'Efficiency of wireless charging can be compared with cable and socket. Energy can even be saved under ideal conditions. Exactly as with the induction hob at home. For example charging losses by heating of cable and battery or by plug contact wear are eliminated in this way. ' http://www.ecartec-paris.eu/html/conductix_wampfler.html I have also seen pretty low efficiencies for charge sockets for wired EV's. This is not magnetic resonance though, and all the figures seem a bit vague to me
      • 5 Months Ago
      Well, here is Wampfler's test data, presumably carried out donkey's years ago as they have had their buses running for ten. I don't really follow their arguments, as in fig16 they show efficiency decreasing rapidly with distance, but go on to state that the optimum air gap is 30cm +/- 10cm: http://www.ecartec-paris.eu/html/conductix_wampfler.html
    • Load More Comments