There's a car club out there for everyone. Case in point: Ford Pinto enthusiasts have embarked on a journey across a large portion of the country. In all, 24 Pintos are making the 1,600-mile trek from Denver, Colorado to the Ford Nationals in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. By the time the group arrives in PA, a few more Pinto fans will join the unique train of cars, bringing the total number of vehicles up to 32.

Along the way, the Ford Pintos are making a few pit stops. For instance, the group already dropped by Kansas Speedway, where drivers pushed their Pintos as high as 95 miles per hour. If that last sentence doesn't sound frightening, you're braver than we are.


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  • 35 Comments
      MemphisNET
      • 3 Years Ago
      A revamped suspension and an EcoBoost 4cyl would make a cool Pinto resto-mod. :D
        D & D
        • 3 Years Ago
        @MemphisNET
        AMEN--Brother, But the old 2.3 can still kick some serious a+**.
      trans-am phoenix
      • 3 Years Ago
      Hopefully no one stops too quickly or its going to look like a Michael Bay movie. LOL
      bssplayr
      • 3 Years Ago
      My family had two of these - the first, a '71 3-door with 4-speed stick, purchased used from my dad's boss. Because of the enormous width of the hatch on these things, we were able to fit stuff into this little car that we couldn't get into my dad's full-size '77 LTD wagon. My mom had to swerve to miss a kid who stepped out from between two parked cars, and hit a GMC van ; the grille and hood were a mess, but it still ran like a champ. It was replaced a few years later with a 1980 model, another 3-door, with an automatic. It had the all-glass hatch, and I thought it looked pretty cool. If not for an unfortunate accident over the Christmas holidays in '84, I would have learned to drive in it. Never had the least concern about safety in those cars - they were cheap, reliable transportation that could haul a heck of a lot when called upon.
      slap
      • 3 Years Ago
      Back in the mid 70's a friend of mine had both a pinto and a toyota corolla wagon. The problem with the pinto was that bolts on the rear differential would pierce the fuel tank in a rear end accident. He said that his corolla had the same problem - bolts that could pierce the fuel tank. Since he was an engineer and a pretty good mechanic, he probably had a pretty good idea of the problem. He added a fix to *BOTH* cars - a plate between the rear differential and gas tank.
      kkakear
      • 3 Years Ago
      My girlfriend had a 1976 Pinto complete with an 8 track player. We traded it for a 1981 Subaru DL hardtop after we got married in 1980. We should have kept the Pinto. It was better in every respect except it was a gas hog compared to the Subaru.
      moratorium04
      • 3 Years Ago
      My mom had the '77 Pinto with the six-cylinder. It was white with slot mags and poop-brown pinstripes along the bottom. Among its endearing features was the vomit-orange vinyl interior that you would get stuck to if you got in without a shirt on, and a floor shifter that you could slam into Reverse from Drive without even pushing the selector button. And believe it or not, we did get rear-ended one time while picking up a pizza and the car miraculously did not explode, although you couldn't convince otherwise the patrons in the restaurant who saw the accident through the window and ducked under the tables. Eventually, it had a slew of overheating problems, so we sold it for $50. It was a nice little car; too bad for its reputation.
      Brummie
      • 3 Years Ago
      Is this the car that used to split its fuel tank after a minor rear end shunt?
        Susan
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Brummie
        The fires were an infamous example of where the manufacturer decided to save an absolutely trivial amount of money, even though engineers in the company had warned of the danger of fires during rear-end collisions. It was horrifying. Ford went on to do two more of these tradeoffs where profit was balanced against human injury and life: the massive mid-1970s Firestone 500 recall, and the late-1990s-2000 Explorer rollover fiasco, where low-grade Firestone (again!) tires had been used on Explorers and the owners told to use much lower pressure than they should have used for the heat and weight conditions. As far as I know, no executive heads ever rolled for these massive lawsuits. This is an example of why you definitely do NOT want industry to be non-regulated.
        Kai F. Lahmann
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Brummie
        The even bigger problem was Ford's reaction: Paying the relatives of the dead victims was cheaper than fixing the car - so they just payed...
      KAG
      • 3 Years Ago
      WOW there are still 24 Pinto's running
      Richard Nicholas
      • 3 Years Ago
      Let's hope there are no sudden stops & if so, that the cars in the back can keep an assured clear distance from the car in front of them; or else we might have a horrific chain reaction on our hands.
        D & D
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Richard Nicholas
        That statement show that you are one of the MILLIONS of uninformed people that believed all of media hype. All that bs sold papers & made a lot of people millions and ruined a fine AMERICAN i repete AMERICAN car.
      Sup Legend
      • 3 Years Ago
      As much as people put down the Pinto, at-least it was rear wheel drive. A bunch of unsafe cars in this world (that are still mass produced ) don't even have it.
        LoneWolf
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Sup Legend
        Yeah, too bad you have to shell out so much $$$ for a 1-series :[
      Red Dart Fever
      • 3 Years Ago
      Ok, this era produced some of the worst cars in terms of quality. Which in your opinion was the worst? While the Pinto was a disaster waiting to happen, I personally believe the Chevy Vega was probably worse. Why? Well while the Pinto needed to be rear ended to burst into flames, the Vega just needed a little bit of time to relatively just burst into pieces. There are plenty of other examples around this era. The Monza, Mustang II ( a personal favorite) The Astre, AMC's and the list goes on!
        Tyler
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Red Dart Fever
        I remember reading an article on the Vega where an owner's literally split in the middle and the back seats and trunk detached.
      hp
      • 3 Years Ago
      Out of the 24 remaining Pintos in the world, I wonder how many will make it the entire 1600 miles...
        D & D
        • 3 Years Ago
        @hp
        Every one of them did!!!! Crow now being served--help yourself.
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