• 2011 Toyota Tundra
  • 2011 Toyota Tundra
  • 2011 Toyota Tundra
  • 2011 Toyota Tundra
  • 2011 Toyota Tundra
  • 2011 Toyota Tundra
  • 2011 Toyota Tundra
  • 2011 Toyota Tundra
  • 2011 Toyota Tundra
  • 2011 Toyota Tundra
  • 2011 Toyota Tundra
  • 2011 Toyota Tundra
2011 Toyota Tundra – Click above for high-res image gallery

The product development cycle at Toyota can be frustrating. More specifically, the process can be frustrating for North American executives who don't have total control over vehicles specifically marketed to their country. Engineers, developers and executives all have a say, but the final decisions have been made in Japan. Until now.

According to a report from Automotive News, Toyota has changed its product development process for North American vehicles. An example of such a vehicle is the Toyota Tundra. That pickup caters to the desires and needs of the U.S. car-buying public, and now Toyota USA will be given the leeway needed to make sure it meets those desires and needs.

The Japanese automaker says it has always listened to its U.S. counterparts. However, the process was stifled due to the requirement that decisions be finalized in Japan. Now, this process can flow more freely. Expect to see the effects of this change beginning with the next generation of the Tundra.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 18 Comments
      Hazdaz
      • 3 Years Ago
      This sounds good, I guess, but the Tundra isn't exactly a runaway success to which they can point and say that US-targeted designs are a big hit in the USDM. In some ways, I think this is actually a bad thing. Toyota became the huge company that they are now because of their bland, but internationally-accepted designs. Look at the Corolla, which I believe is the best selling car of all time, and it sells well around the world, including the US. I feel that good design, is good design - you don't need to tailor a design for one market if its a good design to begin with. It seems that Toyota (as well as VW) is doing the opposite of what GM and Ford are doing in terms of bringing over good European styling into the US market and not aiming for the lowest common denominator that is typical when companies focus solely on the American market.
        ottoingineer
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Hazdaz
        Agreed that the Tundra did not hit the optimistic targets originally set. However the article seems to be about allowing USDM tailored designs to move forward without Japan-HQ approval/micro-managing. This might allow USDM designs to actually reflect the USDM demand, which could be good for both sales and customers. Agreed on the Corolla (generally) as far as "good design is good design"...Overall, Toyota seems to be more focused on "OK for everybody, mostly" rather than having a few performance or niche oriented designs. Admittedly, they have (and continue) to make enormous profits by catering to *most* people, and pandering to enthusiasts (such as here on AB) that want manual transmission, limited slip and performance suspension (instead of cushy) is not the route to profitability. I do wish that Toyota had retained an efficiency approach (in terms of economy, size) across the board, rather than making everything larger and larger. Perhaps the FR-S/FT-86 collaboration w/ Subaru is an attempt to reverse the trend before the Koreans (and Chinese) cover all the niche spots and start eroding the mainstay market share as well...
      Jesus follower!
      • 3 Years Ago
      Well well. I know I'll get downranked but here we go. Sooo, America does not have any final say on the products here in the US until now. So that means all the garbage Toyota produced prior to this moment...well, it was THEIR fault, not " 'Merican" engineering like some people say.
        onewayroll
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Jesus follower!
        hmm.....im trying to think of a Toyota that would have been considered garbage.....still thinking
      Charles
      • 3 Years Ago
      Oh no, does this means we'll be getting American plain-conservative design philosophy "Chevy Impala, Chrysler 200" instead of Japanese fluent, modern and progressive design philosophy? "except Honda"
        Stuka87
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Charles
        Personally, "Toyota" and "Progressive Design" just do not go together at all. They pretty much try and design things to look at plane as possible.
        Jesus follower!
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Charles
        You are joking, right? That is the one thing America has always had over the Japanese, something that does not look like an appliance.
          Dest
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Jesus follower!
          I actually agree with Charles. Perceptions around here need to be updated. Aside from Honda, Lexus and Subaru, the Japanese brands shed their bland designs. I mean just look at the Equinox, Impala, Colarado, Aveo, Traverse, Regal, Lacrosse, Malibu. Jeezus almost everything in GM looks bland and outdated except the Cadillacs and the Terrain. I can say the same about everything Chrysler has. Dodge is okay because of the new grille design. Ford has a lot of interesting designs but, aside from the Fiesta, Taurus, and Focus, they seem to have gone overboard on the chrome recently and scream tacky (Fusion, Edge, Flex, the Super Duty lineup). Just compare that crap to the far sleeker and interesting designs Nissan, Mazda, Mitsubishi, and even Toyota (new Prius, Venza, 4Runner, FJ Cruiser, new Sienna) is pushing out. Subaru, Lexus and Honda are quite bland though.
      tantareanujellob
      • 3 Years Ago
      Does this mean they're going to build a corolla that doesn't suck?
      pwr2lbs
      • 3 Years Ago
      Tacoma 4 Cylinder Turbo Diesel please and thank you! Kthxbye!!!
      tantareanujellob
      • 3 Years Ago
      Well VW tried this and they ended up building a Impala and a 1985 Jetta complete drum brakes and 8 valve motor. Toyota is going the way of VW i'm afraid. Bad example to follow.
      caddy-v
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'm confused. Almost everytime we see an article about the Tundra, all the Toyboys tout how it's designed in the US with no interference from the mother ship. Others claim that the dismall quality lies flatly on the backs of the American design and engineering team. Well? Which is it?
      rlog100
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is the same kind of press release made when these places opened and a lot of people apparently believed. Its done to puff up their presence as people assume this actually will go into effect and in 3 years no one will check. 4-5 years from now there will be another similar 'checks in the mail annoucement' like this again.
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