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If you were thinking about buying the next-generation Porsche 911, you'd better start working out your shifting arm. Car and Driver has managed to extract a bit of information about the upcoming German sports car, and it appears a seven-speed manual transmission will be offered. You will be able to row-row-row-row-row-row-row your own boat gears.

Why the additional cog? Porsche reportedly wanted to supply the next 911 with a taller final gear in order to improve fuel efficiency. Hopefully we'll get to see the all-new shift pattern in the flesh when we head to Europe for the 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 48 Comments
      xmailboxcancerx
      • 3 Years Ago
      Yeah, I like the sound of this. Innovation toward manual transmissions is always pleasantly welcomed.
      rgee01
      • 3 Years Ago
      Nice! I'd love to see some innovation in manual transmissions - I'm also glad to see Porsche isn't forgetting the non-pure-track-numbers enthusiast crowd.
      Robert
      • 3 Years Ago
      Corvette has done the fuel mileage 6th gear for years.. we get 28 to 31 on the highway with 436 hp. But, love Porsches' owned 2
        Jake Feimster
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Robert
        True, but the flat 6 of the 911 doesn't have the torque of a V8, so the Porsche gains more from closer gear ratios.
      Hazdaz
      • 3 Years Ago
      Glad to hear this news! While at first it sounds like 7 might be WAY too many, but the reality is that if 7th is a really tall gear just for highway use, chances are you aren't going to be going into it on regular roads (probably 60 MPH+ roads), so its not going to be overly cumbersome since regular driving around town or even the track, you probably would never even get into 7th.
        nardvark
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Hazdaz
        Yea, I imagine this is a "thruway (or autobahn) only" gear. That said, I have to wonder if it's actually more efficient to have 6 gear from 0-60. Can you really shift so quickly that the slightly higher efficiency is worth having that many gears? It seems like that at some point there can be too many choices.
      diffrunt
      • 3 Years Ago
      Ridiculous!
      another Dan
      • 3 Years Ago
      I've thought about this before. Never thought I'd actually see it outside my mind though.
      goober1424
      • 3 Years Ago
      I don't know why we needed to wait for a seven speed manual from Porsche to have a tall "highway" gear.
      wiggy
      • 3 Years Ago
      7th gear helps with fuel efficiency. Got it, completely ignore 7th gear for life of vehicle.
      cypherxx666xx
      • 3 Years Ago
      as some said, the 7th gear is most likely a cruise-gear, to reduce vibrations and to save fuel. so it is good for highways but on the track u will probably never use the 7th gear in this.
      MLuddyJr
      • 3 Years Ago
      In my lifetime we've gone from 4-speeds to 5-speeds to 6-speeds. There's no reason why a 7-speed couldn't be offered. Every argument for or against the additional gear could be applied to every previous gearbox. The primary downside would be additional complexity and weight, but the difference would probably be negligible. We're already dealing with 7 and 8 speed automatic/dual-clutch boxes, so this would fit right in. As long as they space the gear ratios to suit the power curve I'm all for it.
      kfractal
      • 3 Years Ago
      manual transmissions =~ old codgers who can't let go of their sticks :P
        emperorkoku
        • 3 Years Ago
        @kfractal
        orrrrrrrr people who like optimal control. I'm 25.
          kfractal
          • 3 Years Ago
          @emperorkoku
          you keep using that word. i do not think it means what you think it means (optimal). anyone notice the :P in that post? :) sheesh, tough crowd.
        EnzoHonda
        • 3 Years Ago
        @kfractal
        Why are your even here?
      Myself
      • 3 Years Ago
      Standard manuals are dead. Get over it. They're slow to shift, they slow the car and offer worse fuel economy.
        Hazdaz
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Myself
        Only someone that doesn't know how to drive stick would say that a standard transmission is dead. I couldn't give a rats ass about ultimate speed - someone's drive to work or a store isn't the Indy 500 where you need to shave seconds off your time. Its about the freedom of the open road. Driving a manual is about FUN and control. Its about being able to select a lower or higher gear BEFORE any computer could possibly know because you are visually scanning the road ahead for hills, dips, turns or upcoming traffic.
          nardvark
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Hazdaz
          You can do that with an automated manual and paddle shifters. That's not to say you're not allowed to prefer using your left foot, but there aren't really any arguments other than "I like it more" left.
        graphikzking
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Myself
        Your failing to realize 1 thing: Automatic/ Automated / Dual Clutch / PDK whatever you want to call it are built for a certain power limit. When you start playing with tuning a lot of the automated (not all but most) are not made to handle the excess power/torque that the aftermarket crowd throws at it. Take a Toyota Supra for example: You can put a clutch that can hold 700ft/lbs of torque for $2k. If you were to have to completely built a new automatic trans your looking at well over $5,000. Also, the 335 bmw. You can easily tune them to get 400hp but if you had an automatic trans it might not be able to handle the extra boost etc. I agree that some PDK/DCT systems are more efficient and convenient etc but there are some cases where a manual just makes more sense. They are cheaper (even though produced in smaller numbers) and also they allow tuners to play around with things and even change clutches. Nissan's automated set-up is well over $20,000 in the GTR if you need to be replaced. Meanwhile you can buy a brand new 6speed trans for a corvette, put in a racing clutch, have it hardened etc and still be under 10k. And it will be bullet proof able to take well over 1000hp.
        torqued
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Myself
        3 pedals aren't dead. CVT's get better gas mileage, paddle shifters don't require you to take your hands off the wheel, but most people who can drive stick still prefer it. I'm sorry, I'll just never be happy having a computer decide how fast I meant to accelerate when I hit the gas. More control=better for some of us.
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