• 18
Within hours of posting on the Tesla Roadster's official EPA rating and emphatically pointing out that no production vehicle beat the Roadster's EPA-assigned 111 MPGe rating, along came an automobile that knocked the Roadster from its number one spot. It was bound to happen, right?

So, what's this mystery vehicle that smokes the original Roadster's 111 MPGe rating? It's none other than the Roadster 2.5. The Roadster 2.5's government-certified window sticker shows 112 MPGe on the highway and 124 MPGe in the city, for a combined rating of 119 MPGe. That last number bests the original Roadster's rating by eight mpge. However, all of the other stats (i.e. annual fuel costs, approximate range and kW-hrs per 100 miles) remain unchanged.

Now, Tesla has secured the top two spots in the lofty MPGe club. So, when will a vehicle rise up to the challenge and knock the Roadsters from their perch?

[Source: Consumer Reports]


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 18 Comments
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 4 Years Ago
      More efficient than the Leaf, huh? bitchin! This is what's cool about electric drivetrains. You can have a metric crapton of power and unlike the pumping/transmission losses in larger gas engines running at low load, your power losses are really fractional in a larger electric motor vs a smaller one. In a higher powered car, your only real efficiency loss factors are rolling resistance from the tires, the weight / friction of the larger diffferential.. there is going to be some difference in the efficiency curve of the electric motor while accelerating or climbing a hill, but at cruising power, that difference is going to be almost nothing. You can pretty much have your cake and eat it too with an electric.
      • 4 Years Ago
      The range doesn't se right considering the efficiency is 30kwh per 100 miles
      BipDBo
      • 4 Years Ago
      They both have the same range and both say 30 kw*hr per 100 miles. Am I missing something?
        paulwesterberg
        • 4 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
        Yea you would think that the vehicle efficiency difference would alter the maximum range by at least five miles.
      • 4 Years Ago
      is it not a little strange that the sticker states "The best vehicle rates 99 MPGe" right beside a rating that beats it?
        • 4 Years Ago
        It states the best "midsize cars" The roadster is certainly not a midsize car and I don't know why it is being compared to them.
          • 4 Years Ago
          Name another mass produced electric midsize car currently for sale in the united states that gets 10 MPGe. I really don't see the point you are trying to make.
          paulwesterberg
          • 4 Years Ago
          Name another mass produced electric sports car currently for sale in the united states.
          • 4 Years Ago
          According to Engadget the sticker shown is just a mockup so I expect some changes for the official sticker.
        Ziv
        • 4 Years Ago
        I was laughing about that in the previous thread, as I said there, it appears that the sticker has been overtaken by events on the ground... And I hope it happens again real soon.
      thestigwins
      • 4 Years Ago
      I can't wait for the model S. ;)
        Ben Crockett
        • 4 Years Ago
        @thestigwins
        Yeah, I can't wait till the price also comes out to see if I can afford one - Australian pricing. (Roadster pricing in Oz is about $AUD 220k for base model).
      Aaron Schwarz
      • 4 Years Ago
      Woot Woot: I posted this one to my Wall and it is one of my favorite images: It speaks powerfully to the issue in a way that makes $ense to almost everyone, especially philarguros Americans.
      Brody
      • 4 Years Ago
      They should use MPGe (gasoline) on Diesels also. The VW Jetta TDI would go from 34 MPG to 28.9 MPGe (gasoline). No more tricking consumers about diesel oil use.
        Joeviocoe
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Brody
        Diesel contains 37.3 MJ/L Gasoline contains 34.2 MJ/L So a gallon of Gasoline contains only about 92% of the energy of a gallon of diesel. So the MPGe of a 34 MPG (diesel) would be .... 31.2 MPGe *** not 29, please get your math right. *** Not bad since the same 2011 VW Jetta gasoline version only gets 27 MPG --------------------------- And many VW owners have agreed that the 2007 and later TDIs have serious reduced EPA fuel economy compared to the the earlier models. Most people actually get 38 MPG on diesel, not 34. And prior to 2006... the VW Jetta TDI model gets a consistent 40 - 45 MPG. That is before the Teir II bin 5 standard became law in the U.S.
      erhcanadian
      • 4 Years Ago
      The difference between 111 and 119 is miniscule. The EPA should use "gallons per 100 miles". 21 MPG = 4.76 gallons per 100 miles 29 MPG = 3.45 gallons per 100 miles An "8 MPG" improvement results in a difference of 1.31 gallons consumed during a 100 mile trip. 111 MPG = 0.90 gallons per 100 miles 119 MPG = 0.84 gallons per 100 miles An "8 MPG" improvement results in a difference of 0.06 gallons (or equivalent) consumed during a 100 mile trip.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 4 Years Ago
        @erhcanadian
        They should not be using any kind of gallon measurement for electric cars. Electricity doesn't come in gallon sized increments :)
        • 4 Years Ago
        @erhcanadian
        Waaaahh. Try and find any gas car where 8 MPG difference is no big deal.
    • Load More Comments