According to a survey conducted by the Consumer Reports National Research Center, new car buyers are factoring fuel economy as a larger concern in their purchases. That's no real surprise given that prices at the pump remain high, but the study also revealed that those same consumers are unwilling to sacrifice safety just to net a few additional miles per gallon.

The research revealed that 62 percent of buyers say they are planning to buy a vehicle with much better or significantly better fuel economy than their current ride. On average, that translates to fuel economy of 29 mpg or better. Surprisingly enough, 10 percent of those questioned said that they expected 40 mpg or better from their next purchase. That means that buyers will need to be willing to make all sorts of concessions, including making compromises on purchase price, vehicle size and the number of options.

One factor those surveyed evidently won't give up on, however, is safety. Only 11 percent of the total respondents said they would be willing to compromise safety for greater fuel economy. Read the complete summary over at Consumer Reports.


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  • 19 Comments
      GeorgeAtha
      • 3 Years Ago
      you got to love Autoblog... This article and the line of Prii is right above the news and the assembly line picture of large GM SUVs ...
      • 3 Years Ago
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      SnapUndersteer
      • 3 Years Ago
      I guess that makes me the polar opposite of the typical car buyer. Fuel economy: if I want to save on fuel costs, I'll find a way to drive less. Safety: as long as its got four wheels, a body, and a seat belt to hold me in, that's good enough for me.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @SnapUndersteer
        [blocked]
      Compliance
      • 3 Years Ago
      Who is going to say yes when asked if they want less safety? It is a dumb question, because "safety", and how much is or is not necessary is not quantifiable. As long as a car doesn't flunk a crash test it's fine. These results are fairly meaningless.
      pantospatacos
      • 3 Years Ago
      Good thing the Prius just got top safety pick, http://www.iihs.org/news/rss/pr052611.html
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        • 3 Years Ago
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      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 3 Years Ago
      Good thing you don't have to compromise safety for high fuel efficiency with modern cars. And the more smaller cars on the road there are, the less likely you are to be involved in an accident with a larger car.... someone's gotta take the first step.
      Yeah yeah
      • 3 Years Ago
      Why does Autoblog say drivers are going to have to make all kind of sacrifices to get 40 mpg? The poeple surveyed are likely thinking highway mpg when they say that, because, let's face it, when people talk fuel economy they talk the highway mpg rating. That being the case, how hard would it be fore 10% of car buyers to get 40 mpg highway. Anyone buying a compact or smaller is likely going to be able to meet that benchmark based on the newer offering we are seeing, so where is the sacrifice in that?
        JackS
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Yeah yeah
        Why do you assume most people mean highway? Most miles driven in the U.S. are actually city miles, which is why the EPA combined rating more heavily weights city mileage. I care a lot more about the city mileage than the highway mileage because it's pretty rare that I get to cruise nonstop on a highway.
      baconpocket
      • 3 Years Ago
      im willing to sacrifice some safety for performance.
      Juan Chavez
      • 3 Years Ago
      I agree with this, with the prices of fuel going up every day, consumers are always going to buy the cars that smaller cars and no the big trucks that people were buying a couple of years ago. car lifts for sale
      Drive571
      • 3 Years Ago
      In other news, consumers want to have their cake and eat it too. On the other hand, in all realism, the statistically average car buyer (age, income, etc) would probably not consider it a "sacrifice" for their car to do 0-60 in 10 seconds instead of 6 or 7. In most urban/suburban areas, it seems you can't use much more performance than that in 80-90% of your driving anyway, even if you wanted to. Many automakers still bundle the best, most desirable options (nav, leather, other goodies) with a big engine to rake in the bucks. One suspects that what consumers really want is to be able to buy a base-engined model with all the trimmings, as I think Hyundai's option structure often allows for.
      tributetodrive
      • 3 Years Ago
      Interestingly people seem to rarely actually carry out plans they say they intend to do and rarely say what they mean. http://www.economics.harvard.edu/faculty/mullainathan/files/peoplemeansay.pdf
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