According to The Daily Telegraph, young drivers in Britain can pay as much as £546 per month for auto insurance. That's around $890/month at current conversion rates. The report indicates that UK drivers between the ages of 17 and 22 years old pay an average of £5,957 – around $9,640.

And you thought it was expensive to get car insurance for your child.

Why the steep price tag for UK drivers with Learner's tags? It's no shock to learn that young drivers carry a higher risk of being involved in an accident than their elder counterparts, and as such, insurance companies assign higher premiums to the group. Unfortunately, as a result of these tough insurance prices, it's estimated that as much as 20 percent of UK drivers between the ages of 17 and 22 are driving without any coverage at all.

Additionally, around 41 percent of UK parents are currently insuring their child's vehicle in their name to cut costs. Unfortunately, doing so is illegal, and insurance companies can refuse to cover a claim if they find that parents have been fronting insurance for their young drivers.

So what's the solution? The Daily Telegraph reports that some insurance companies are turning to a black box that measures g-forces from sudden acceleration, braking and cornering, as well as the time of day that the vehicle is being driven and its speed to custom-tailor insurance premiums. Similar measures are being undertaken here in the States as well.


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  • 23 Comments
      rocketmoose
      • 3 Years Ago
      It stems from the fact that most people in the age group think that by performing a handbrake turn in the Tesco car park will make the clothes fall off the females outside. This is obviously not the case, and the only thing that falls off is the bumper when they plough into the trolley shelter. Which is annoying, because it means the legitimately careful drivers are unfairly punished for the mouthbreathing, pus-ridden retards in the same age group's lack of decorum. Yes, I mad, because it affected me.
        Synthono
        • 3 Years Ago
        @rocketmoose
        Yeah, but teenagers around the world are like that, I doubt UK teens are worse. Definitely know that the stunts my peers and I pulled at 16 were comparable to a handbrake turn at Tescos, but we paid a tiny fraction of what you do.
      Jonathan Wilson
      • 3 Years Ago
      Why don't they offer the option of going for 3rd party only insurance, something that means that if you are in an accident and its your fault, your insurance only covers the other party and not you. Would be good for all those young drivers who have bought cheap cars where they are worth so little and/or are so old that its not really worth getting comprehensive insurance for them.
        designermart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Jonathan Wilson
        They do offer third party only. Its still really expensive if youre a youngster.
      Jonathan
      • 3 Years Ago
      Thats a new car every year. Do new uk drivers really cause that much insurance payouts?
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Jonathan
        [blocked]
      Vaggeli
      • 3 Years Ago
      My first year here in the uk (for uni) i bought a merc 190e 2.5-16 and insured it for £1200/annum. BUT, Ive had it now 3 years with no claims or driving violations...paid £1240 for my renewal a month ago. It was ridiculously cheap to insure when i got it, a nissan micra cost the same to insure lol. Theres other "quick" cars that can be cheap to insure, just find one young people dont buy. old celicas with smaller engines (non-gt4), VW Bora (Jetta) V5, audi a3 1.8T...all pretty reasonable. Have a friend here who paid 1900 pounds to insure a 1 litre 3 cylinder 1995 Vauxhall (opel) Corsa...ridiculous. (he had a clean license and 2 years no claims bonus)
      Shiftright
      • 3 Years Ago
      I love England and get along very well with English people, but it has turned into the ultimate nanny state / Big Brother nightmare. Plus they drive on the wrong side and their weather is awful.
        rocketmoose
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Shiftright
        Our weather is pretty ******* temperate actually. It's rarely below 5c and it's rarely above 30c. Boring, but sane weather. And I'd like you to point out some proof to the "nanny state" claim that isn't sourced from the Daily Mail.
        C Smith
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Shiftright
        Well it hasn't rained here in Eat Anglia for over a month and it has often been over 20 degrees (Celsius) - we are in a drought and rainfall is 16% of normal. Not great for farmers or water users I'll agree, but better I think than the mid-west at the moment. I agree about the nanny state though, too many of us being taxed to keep layabouts in free flats, booze, cigarettes, babies and drugs - in whatever order you care to choose!
      Drive571
      • 3 Years Ago
      Let me re-title that for you... "British Pound Still Worth More Than US Dollar." Slightly less exciting story now
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Igrok
      • 3 Years Ago
      The author made a mistake. In article they say - the insurance reached £3,688 ($5,957). And not £5,957 ($9,640). I think it is just an error in calculation
      cliodave
      • 3 Years Ago
      daily telegraph is a rag, and those numbers are massivly inflated its high at 2k ish atm, thank you uninsured drivers, but no-where near 5k, let alone 10
      seansverige
      • 3 Years Ago
      Slow news day, eh Autoblog? Our (UK) press has a bad rep - justifiably so - so why are you just repeating nonsense like this without questioning it. The research was conducted by an insurance broker; they don't cite the source, criteria or allow access to the data. There are glaring omissions: they've not stated either way if this is new or used cars (or both) and critically, what level of cover. Having shocked you a big number they then just 'coincidently' present a solution, even telling us who offers this service. Please; this isn't journalism, it's a f**king advertorial. If you want to run stories like this, why not point out some glaring contradictions. Road deaths in the UK have hovered around the 3-3.5k for some years, but we're told the zero (not actually achievable) is the aim, hence the proliferation of things like speed cameras. However, a disproportionate number of these deaths are young drivers (the article also points out that it's a major risk within that age group), so surely the most effective way to make a change is to focus on this group; but of course that would mean fewer tickets (and less revenue) from the rest of us...
      Jozi
      • 3 Years Ago
      I wonder is that both male and female that pay the high price? I had a full license and 3yrs named driving when my sister got added to parent policy, she physically couldn't drive yet her insurance was cheaper than mine!
      Igrok
      • 3 Years Ago
      Oh, sorry, my mistake - they do say this. The insurance premium can reach £5957 when paid in instalments. Was curious to see this amount - as the highest I saw was around £3000. The best deal for a new driver you'll get - if you buy a brand new small car. The cheapest insurance will cost you around £800 a year in London. (can be cheaper in other areas).
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