Europe is a dangerous place to be a pedestrian. With crowded cities characterized by gridlock and narrow streets, you have to be on your game every second to avoid getting bowled over by a raging, overzealous motorist. All too often, that spells tragedy.

With one-sided car-on-human accidents on the rise, automakers are feeling increased pressure from their governments to make their cars safer, not just for the guy behind the wheel, but the guy they might hit.

Porsche is apparently working on a pop-up hood for the upcoming 911, which would raise up in the event of a collision with a pedestrian and, with any luck, reduce the severity of their injuries. The system works via a set of time delay-controlled actuators, which helps ensure that the system protects unfortunate passerby as effectively as possible.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 15 Comments
      alej469
      • 3 Years Ago
      "Europe is a dangerous place to be a pedestrian." - Wow, Europe hater much?
        creamwobbly
        • 3 Years Ago
        @alej469
        Hm. I see far fewer pedestrians here in the US than I ever did in Europe. #1 everything's more spread out here; #2 the US transit authorities care more about moving vehicles than people; #3 the only pedestrians here are those who *have* to be pedestrians, or those who *want* to be pedestrians. By comparison in the UK, every residential street has a footpath ("sidewalk"); very rarely only on one side of the street, and with sensibly placed pedestrian crossings ("crosswalks"). The reason we say "sidewalk" in the US is because the footpath pretty much always follows a roadway. Across Europe, footpaths take shortcuts. Plus, with everything less spread out, it follows there's less space to park, so it makes more sense to walk, take a bus, train, or taxi -- many of which services, if they're not set up by local authorities, are regulated by them. Take a bus in Tucson? Not likely, unless you like knife fights.
        Lachmund
        • 3 Years Ago
        @alej469
        no, just the typical stereotypical bs
      Lachmund
      • 3 Years Ago
      "in the u.s. with our huge streets people don't run in front of cars, you know"
      Tuga
      • 3 Years Ago
      " Europe is a dangerous place to be a pedestrian... you have to be on your game every second to avoid getting bowled over by a raging, overzealous motorist " OR, you can use the sidewalks. Anywho, just to add another car with a pop-up hood, the Citroen C6 has had one since launch in 06.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        creamwobbly
        • 3 Years Ago
        Autoblog's summary reads like Porsche is the first to do this -- those other comments are just pointing out that others have their own systems already.
      tourcon455
      • 3 Years Ago
      Why does the 911 need this? The engine is in the back.
      Tom Namo (aka ?)
      • 3 Years Ago
      the Cadillac CTS also has an active pedestrian protection hood
      diabloz530
      • 3 Years Ago
      Honda's pop-up hood system was introduced in 2004. http://world.honda.com/news/2004/4040824_02.html
        cordbiter
        • 3 Years Ago
        @diabloz530
        the EU honda legend came to market actually in 2006 -- only a year before the CTS... interesting
      cordbiter
      • 3 Years Ago
      Cadillac CTS also has an active pedestrian protection hood -- since 2007!
      Synthono
      • 3 Years Ago
      Why is it that I think hitting pedestrians a second time with a pop up hood is a bad idea?
        Rotation
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Synthono
        The hood has a little give in it. The system is trying to keep the passenger from impacting the engine block directly. I don't know if the systems actually reduce injuries or if merely keeping the passenger from impacting the engine block is enough to meet the regulations regardless of injury rates.
      EB110Americana
      • 3 Years Ago
      Wait, aren't those laws supposed to keep pedestrians caught in a collision with the car from impacting hard, non-deformable objects, namely the engine block? The 911 has its engine in the rear, so what is the hood protecting the pedestrians from? Bowling paraphernalia?
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