991 Porsche 911 spy shots – Click above for high-res image gallery

The next generation Porsche 911 will be a significant departure from all previous generations, though to the untrained eye that could be a hot-air boast. The chief novelty of the 991, confirmed for us recently by Porsche sources in Germany, is that the entire range will benefit from a KERS device, such as what was used by a couple of teams in Formula 1 in 2009 and then immediately banned by the FIA for the 2010 season as an unfair advantage, only to be allowed again for this 2011 season.

The Kinetic Energy Recovery System takes brake energy recuperation to a whole new sophisticated level, putting it on reserve for when you want the pedal on the metal for quick overtaking. But it's not stored in any additional onboard battery system – instead, it is meted out via a dedicated special flywheel system.

The chief giveaway that Porsche is definitely planning the KERS strategy is the added wheelbase length of four whole inches together with added vehicle length of 2.75 inches. Just the right amount of distance for incorporating the new flywheel technology between the gearbox and engine.

Though the starter 991 911 Carrera is earmarked to have 350 horsepower from a smaller 3.4-liter flat-six engine, the KERS ingredient will give the car acceleration figures comfortably quicker than the 4.7-second 0-to-60 time of the current 997 911 Carrera. And this direction ensures that the new 911 can still emit less noxious stuff, go faster, go farther on a gallon, and, according to our sources, even weigh around 100 pounds less as Porsche rolls out more and more lightweight materials usage where we've never seen it before.


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  • 36 Comments
      Ryan Tambourine
      • 3 Years Ago
      If you're going to write an article about KERS get it right. The teams decided that they collectively would not use KERS for the 2010 season it was not banned. For 2011 the minimum weight of the cars was increased making more sense to run KERS during the seasons
      Car Guy
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'm glad to see other technologies being utilized besides a trunk full of toxic batteries.
        brian
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Car Guy
        What are you talking about? There's nothing toxic about Lithium Ion batteries, and since neither Lithium nor Iron "Wear out", they're highly recyclable.
      TokyoRemix
      • 3 Years Ago
      This just made my week. Porsche always has something to keep it ahead of the competition. Everyone complains about how each car is the same as the last, and in the key aspects, they are. But anyone driving a 991 Carrera after the 2005 997 model will be blown away by the difference. More power with less displacement, KERS, dynamic engine mounts.... What an amazing car this is. I feel sorry for the guy who has to test the 991 GT2's KERS system. Hope they have life insurance. :D
      dmojavensis
      • 3 Years Ago
      Hopefully they will still have a stick-shift 911 with KERS
      Jonathan Arena
      • 3 Years Ago
      Kers was not banned as an unfair advantage, it was mutually agreed to be dropped by all teams as a cost saving measure.
      Pandamasque
      • 3 Years Ago
      "...such as what was used by a couple of teams in Formula 1 in 2009 and then immediately banned by the FIA for the 2010 season as an unfair advantage, only to be allowed again for this 2011 season." What a load of nonsense!!! Check your facts!
      Brian
      • 3 Years Ago
      I didn't think KERS was banned in 2010, just that the teams all agreed to not use it.
      QAZZY
      • 3 Years Ago
      All round, I have to say the 911 is the best sports car. It's really versatile, from the more affordable (for a sports car) base 911, to the track monster known as the GT3 RS 4.0 or the even more ridiculous GT2 RS. If you want to get supercar-beating acceleration times, you get the 911 Turbo (with all its ridiculous PDK, AWD and whatnot) that accelerates 0-60 faster than the Lamborghini Aventador for less than half the price (don't trust the official performance numbers from Porsche, they've always been conservative). Sure they all look the same from the other models and even pretty much all the past models, but if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Only qualm: you have a large flywheel spinning behind you at 60,000 rpm. I do NOT want to be hit by that if I crash (it may not be razor-sharp, but it's definitely not foam-padded, and WILL do serious damage spinning at 60,000 rpm).
        Mike B
        • 3 Years Ago
        @QAZZY
        Lamborghini is also conservative, and if history doesn´t fail, the Aventador will do 2.7 0-100km/h (62mph) The Turbo can only do 3.1 and the Turbo S 3.0 and what happens after that? Lamborghini claims 0-200 km/h (124mph) in 8.9, the fastest the Turbo has done? 10.4 and the gap gets bigger the faster they go. And please, don't come up with those bullshit 1ft roll out 0-60 times from the americam magazines.
      MindlessOath
      • 3 Years Ago
      its a good thing the GT-R is faster and more affordable. They have alot left in the GT-R to make it faster still, so while p-cars advance the gt-r will come out with something faster.
      soundbargaming
      • 3 Years Ago
      No!!!! More weight, here we go. Just use a full electric or full gas PLEASE! The combined weight of both is unnecessary.
        Lachmund
        • 3 Years Ago
        @soundbargaming
        if you read the article there is no such thing as an electric drive or battery used
        Hatzenbach
        • 3 Years Ago
        @soundbargaming
        "...according to our sources, even weigh around 100 pounds less as Porsche rolls out more and more lightweight materials usage where we've never seen it before." notice: there's an article between headline and comment section. btw, do you really think that a fully electric version with tons of batteries and an inferior range would be lighter than an electric flywheel combined with an internal combustion engine? KERS is an F1 derivate, e.g. the weight is siginifcantly lower than the one of a pure electric powertrain for the masses toyota is struggling to get enough raw materials for batteries of only one model, how is this supposed to change if every company jumps on this bandwaggon? don't get me wrong: i'm open minded to every new technology, but i highly doubt that this is the answer to our problems. e-cars have been around for 100 years, a 100 years of development and we still face the same problems, that we had a century ago, but suddenly no one (manufacturers, goverments and customers) seems to care, ain't that strange? we made progress, of course, but i just have to pull the plug out of my one y/o laptop and wait an hour to see how much progress we've made, it's amazing, really!! correct me if i'm wrong, but that's how i see it.
        EnzoHonda
        • 3 Years Ago
        @soundbargaming
        I'm glad you know more than the engineers of the world's most famous and prolific sports car maker. I just can't believe no company has hired you to develop their future technology.
          Aowolf
          • 3 Years Ago
          @EnzoHonda
          I highly doubt the 100 lbs, gained will cancel out the increased performance added by this system. More power and better efficiency, and the possibility of a big red boost button, whats not to like?
      wonky donky.
      • 3 Years Ago
      awesome. One more thing to break on a Porsche! Everyone hold up your failed IMS or RMS and say, "YEAH!"
      jgcookjr
      • 3 Years Ago
      Again with the vinyl sticker instead of a real intake for the rear. Any speculation that the could be a front-engine car? Or may just front intakes, which isn't unusual for Porsche, but then why the sticker? And last time we saw the car it's nose was buried in snow - blocked intake test?
        Tippy Dobbs
        • 3 Years Ago
        @jgcookjr
        I don't know what's up with the sticker, but I can pretty much guarantee you that the Porsche 911 will never have its engine at the front.
        Synthono
        • 3 Years Ago
        @jgcookjr
        Judging from past models, it's likely that the turbo will have a big vent, while the regular flavor will not. So it might be a weird way of making people confused about what's being tested.
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