The national average price of gasoline has hit exactly $4 a gallon, approximately a dime below its all-time high. According to a Lundberg Survey of fueling stations released on Sunday, pump prices rose 12 cents over the past two weeks. On July 7, 2008, the national average price of gas soared to $4.114 a gallon, a record-setting high, according to data from the U.S. Department of Energy.

If you're hunting for bargain gas, and willing to drive to get it, then Tucson, AZ offers you the lowest average price among cities surveyed at just $3.62 a gallon. Meanwhile, drivers in Chicago suffered the most, having to dish out an average of $4.50 for a single gallon of the go-juice.

The U.S. Department of Energy will release its weekly survey of diesel and gasoline prices on Monday afternoon. Who's willing to bet that prices will have come down by then?


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 119 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        martim
        • 3 Years Ago
        I'd love to do that, but I'd need a shower once I got to work... it's 20 km with lot's of hills. :-( When I lived in London I cycled to university and back totaling 30 km per day. London is mostly flat. I loved it.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @martim
          [blocked]
        nardvark
        • 3 Years Ago
        I bike to work sometimes. It's 10 miles each way, about 7 miles of it is on sand/gravel paths. I enjoy it, but it's not a true substitute for the car. It requires about 2 hours of time, vs 30-40 minutes driving, plus I have to show twice per day (including once at work), so that's an extra 15-20 minutes lost. It's not possible in the winter, and large parts of the spring and fall are too wet (the path becomes a mud pit). It's also not obvious that it saves me money, because while I save about $3 of gas, I'm pretty sure I eat more than $3 of extra food to make up for the ~1400 extra calories I burn. I also wouldn't do it if it requires 10 miles on busy road, instead of the path. Only a matter of time before you get pegged by a Mercedes around here.
        John
        • 3 Years Ago
        must be a sweet bike for $0.
          Syke
          • 3 Years Ago
          @John
          I'm not surprised - I've been a bicycle mechanic since the late sixties, often find salvable bikes at the local transfer station (aka dump), and even tearing one down and rebuilding into like-new mechanical shape would come out to about $60-75. I'll never have a $0 bike because I'm a bit demanding on what I ride, but rebuilding one for less than a tank of gas is easily doable.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @John
          [blocked]
      Ducman69
      • 3 Years Ago
      Nice to see how the price of gas will go up well in advance of the price of oil rising, thanks to speculators. But when the price of oil goes down, gas prices remain high. So why exactly are we still spending trillions in involvements in the middle east if we got Bin Laden and its not giving us cheap gas in the least? And President Obama claims to have lifted the Gulf moratorium after the courts ruling, and yet to date not a single deepwater permit has been issued by the government, effectively continuing the ban, escalating prices, and putting so many out of work. We had to close down our whole office in Carlyss thanks to the unofficial ban.
      artandcolour2010
      • 3 Years Ago
      It has been more than $4/gallon in Connecticut for quite a while. I believe premium is up to $4.79 in town. Of course, I ride my bike so I don't have to pay for gas for the car, but I've noticed all FOOD is going up. I bet it's directly attributable to rising fuel/transportation costs.
        goVintage
        • 3 Years Ago
        @artandcolour2010
        The price of gas in ruining the economy. When gas goes up, so do all other commodities. Food, clothing, etc etc. Thank to big oil, people are living on the streets
        Jim R
        • 3 Years Ago
        @artandcolour2010
        It is. The prices of everything are going up, because ultimately everything that's sold in a store got there on the back of a truck at some point--or several points. Trucks use diesel fuel. The more fuel costs, the more those trucking companies charge. The more they charge, the more the store has to charge to make up for lost profits. Which means even if you're a super tree-hugger, who wears all hemp clothing and rides his bicycle to Whole Foods, you're still paying for those higher fuel prices. I laugh whenever someone says the US needs high gas prices. The US needs high gas prices like I need a bullet in my brain, and that's a pretty apt descriptor for what'll happen to the country if fuel prices stay this high for too long.
      tributetodrive
      • 3 Years Ago
      Who knew snookie drove a stang.
      brado
      • 3 Years Ago
      It is interesting that when we say 'oil', many people think most of it comes from the Middle East.
        Ben
        • 3 Years Ago
        @brado
        I cant speak for the rest of the Country but hear in Northern Wis, the oil distributers I know say 80-85% comes from Canada
      ack154
      • 3 Years Ago
      Nice to see that the recent drop in oil prices has had such an equal effect on the price of gas. You know, like when the price of oil skyrockets and so does the gas price?
        Dave
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ack154
        When prices trend upward, gas stations base the retail price on the wholesale replacement cost, and when the price trends downward they base the price on the fuel already in their tanks. Mostly it's about smoothing out cash flow, but there's definitely an element of greed.
      EvilTollMan
      • 3 Years Ago
      Wet Paint
      MLuddyJr
      • 3 Years Ago
      Can those of you comparing U.S. fuel prices to the rest of the world please do a little research before you spout nonsense? "For the first quarter of 2009, the mean state gasoline tax is 27.2 cents per US gallon, plus 18.4 cents per US gallon federal tax making the total 45.6 cents per US gallon (12.0 ¢/L)." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuel_tax#United_States "Using the UK average untaxed pump price for unleaded petrol of £0.4572 per litre (from the December 2010 average taxed price of £1.221 per litre,[5] the duty rate of £0.5819 per litre[4] and the then VAT rate of 17.5%) this would give a January 2011 taxed price of £1.256 per litre (£5.71 per imperial gallon or £4.75 per U.S. gallon) - that is equivalent to a tax rate of 175%" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuel_tax#United_Kingdom The rest of the world pays more at the pump for *taxes* not fuel. If you don't like the amount you pay in taxes, find some new land and start a revolution.
        Spigwan
        • 3 Years Ago
        @MLuddyJr
        People DO understand why the prices are different. What they don't understand is why Americans still complain despite enjoying what must be some of the lowest fuel costs in the developed world. This goes double when you look at the engine sizes still in fashion over there. The smallest most economical engines available here aren't even on the options list in the U.S.
          Mike
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spigwan
          The U.S. and most of the rest of the world are vastly different when it comes to infrastructure and lifestyle. European cities (for the most part) are often densly populated with small roads, heavy traffic and good public transportation. Meanwhile, by comparison, the average U.S. city is less densly populated, has larger, longer, straighter roads, has poor public transportation, and has a great deal of it's workers living outside of the city in surrounding towns. It would be very easy to drive an 80hp diesel in a crowded city setting where you can't gain much speed between stops but on major interstate highways (oft travelled for the common worker in the U.S.), a vehicle that takes 13 seconds to get to 60 mph is nearly dangerous. Our entrance ramps dump you into 80 mph traffic and you need to get out there and merged with traffic relatively quickly. While it is possible to drive this way, many don't want to so they don't choose the small engine and that's been proven over the years and is the reason why automakers rarely even offer them anymore.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spigwan
          [blocked]
        MickL
        • 3 Years Ago
        @MLuddyJr
        I pay $1.50 a litre for fuel, thats what is written on the sign at the servo. The reason why its being compared is because its directly comparable when you consider thats what you pay out of your pocket (who the hell stands there thinking about how much tax they're paying when they're filling up? BTW, Australia isnt the UK and neither is Portugal ;) ).
      Junkyard Willie
      • 3 Years Ago
      This chick would be considered a 4 in Los Angeles every chick here is a aspiring models/actors and taxes and gas are threw the ruff.
      Shane
      • 3 Years Ago
      wet pants
      kos10
      • 3 Years Ago
      That is a Mustang that she is pumping gas into... Girl is nice.
      Mike
      • 3 Years Ago
      While it may have nipped the top in price this year, it won't stay that way for long, in Chicago here, it's already come down from the high and with the price of oil coming down, the price of gas will most likely continue to drop (especially after Memorial Day).
    • Load More Comments