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The massive earthquake and ensuing tsunami that struck Japan on March 11th has, in some ways, crippled the nation. But with massive relief efforts underway, the country will eventually recover from this disastrous mess. Surprisingly, electric vehicles have aided relief efforts in Japan during this period of recovery.

Recently, New York Times reporter, Ken Belson, posted an article detailing the disaster and recovery in Japan. Belson, having spent five weeks in Japan, witnessed firsthand the devastation across the island nation. Though Belson mainly reported on the efforts to contain the damaged nuclear power plants in Fukushima, he was intrigued by the sight of electric vehicles aiding in the nation's relief efforts. As Belson says, plug-in vehicles contributed to rescue efforts "because while gasoline has been in short supply in northeastern Japan, electricity has been restored in most places." According to Belson, the durability of electric vehicles on the debris-strewn streets in Sendai, Japan may "convince skeptical consumers that the cars are more than electric toys for the environmentally minded."

[Source: New York Times]


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  • 8 Comments
      Lissa Huang
      • 6 Months Ago
      I like electric vehicls which are environmental friendly and no noise. Thanks for sharing this good article with us.know more from Marshell Green Power CO., LTD, http://www.marshell.net
      Rotation
      • 6 Months Ago
      Japan has rolling blackouts right now. They just shut down another nuclear plant last week. They can't even run some of the high speed trains full time because of this. More EVs isn't what they need at the moment. It'll be great when they get back to normal over there.
        Marcopolo
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Rotation
        The rolling blackout are not just due to Japans nuclear facilities (which in the main endured the catastrophe extremely well) . Japan has seized this occasion to complete a total overhaul of all power generating systems and is still coping with the problems created by the two oldest and differently designed nuclear reactors. For all the fuss concerning the damage done to the Japanese nuclear power system, one thing has been established, that nuclear power plant can be designed and constructed to withstand extreme catastrophic conditions. Tokyo Electric says it will have everything back to 'normal' within 15 months. I guess this will be a great disappointment for the anti-nuclear lobby, who craved for the satisfaction of a really catastrophic outcome involving the deaths of millions. Nevertheless, having been confounded by good engineering, the conspiracy theorists will just go ahead and invent a conspiracy fantasy, as always.
        Schmart Guy
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Rotation
        @Rotation, According to the NYT article, the rolling blackouts are occurring during the day and the cars are being charged over night when there is a surplus. A few more EVs will not be a problem and may just be needed.
        lne937s
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Rotation
        Remember that nuclear plants are "always on" generation. They generate basically the same amount of electricity, whether you need it or not. At night, people don't need electricity as much. EV's actually help stabilize the grid.
          Arun Murali
          • 6 Months Ago
          @lne937s
          @Rotation: Except that Peaking plants can run at full capacity during night too, if needed.
          Rotation
          • 6 Months Ago
          @lne937s
          Nuclear plants are base-load plants. They wouldn't be turned off at night under any circumstances. It's the other plants that would reduce output (peaking plants). So if you have a system with (say) 100kW capacity in base-load and 100kW in peaking, you would have 200kW in the day and 100kW at night. Now take away half the base-load plants. Now you have 150kW in the day and 50kW at night. The power shortage is even more acute at night than it is during the day.
      • 6 Months Ago
      The rolling blackouts are currently on hold thanks to energy conservation efforts. The plant that just went offline is part of the Western Japan power grid, and will have no effect on the blackouts here in Eastern Japan. Right after the quake there was a huge fuel shortage, 8 hr waits for 20L of fuel, large numbers of stations closed because there was no fuel. For about two weeks it was quite bad Being able to charge at that point would have been fabulous.