The North American headquarters for Porsche has been in an Atlanta suburb for years, but a report by the Atlanta Journal Constitution suggests that's about to change. Unnamed sources claim that the German automaker is planning to announce that it will build a new headquarters on the site of the former Ford Taurus plant, just outside the Hartsfield-Atlanta International Airport.

The old plant has since been leveled and the ground has been scrubbed of environmental hazards left from years of industrial use, so Porsche will need to start from scratch. That's probably a good thing, since the German company reportedly plans to build a new offices where the plant was demolished and a new test track very similar to the automaker's facility in Silverstone, England. Porsche's lease at its current location ends in 2013, and it is likely to take several years to complete a new facility.

If true, the move would bring hundreds of new marketing and sales jobs to the region, though most positions are likely already filled at Porsche's current suburban location. Porsche is expected to make the announcement on Thursday.


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  • 16 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      HaterSlayer
      • 3 Years Ago
      NOOOO!! Stay in Atlanta :(
        The Box
        • 3 Years Ago
        @HaterSlayer
        The rumored site is still in Atlanta. They're just moving from the north to the south, which is nice since they'll be within spitting distance of their parts warehouse and engineering/support department.
        axiomatik
        • 3 Years Ago
        @HaterSlayer
        ummm, it's just moving from one part of the metro to another.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @HaterSlayer
        [blocked]
        manchi
        • 3 Years Ago
        @HaterSlayer
        Hartsfieled-Jackson airport is Atlanta airport. I know exactly where is the old Ford plant located. Just wonder how big the track will be.
        Hazdaz
        • 3 Years Ago
        @HaterSlayer
        The article says that the old Ford facility is just outside the Hartsfield-Atlanta International Airport. Is that really all that far from Atlanta proper?
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Hazdaz
          [blocked]
      Basil Exposition
      • 3 Years Ago
      Kudos to Porsche for the brownfield development. Much more responsible than Nissan's recent greenfield development of it's new US HQ.
      pwr2lbs
      • 3 Years Ago
      Long overdue!
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      968
      • 3 Years Ago
      I could see the current HQ from my old office window, and a friend who worked there would alert me whenever new or interesting cars were in the parking garage (e.g., 997 pre-launch, Carrera GT). The new location will give PCNA exposure to hundreds of thousands of daily I-75 travelers and Hartsfield flyers. I wonder if the design will incorporate any visual elements directed at those flying overhead, like the "Zoom Zoom" track on Mazda's commercials. I sympathize with the employees, who will face a nasty commute and have to deal with building-rattling takeoffs and landings every minute (there's another design question -- how does an architect compensate for that?).
      968
      • 3 Years Ago
      I could see the current HQ from my old office window, and a friend who worked there would alert me whenever new or interesting cars were in the parking garage (e.g., pre-launch 997, Carrera GT). The new location will give PCNA exposure to hundreds of thousands of daily I-75 travelers and Hartsfield flyers. I wonder if the design will incorporate any visual elements directed at those flying overhead, like the "Zoom Zoom" track on Mazda's commercials. I sympathize with the employees, who will face a nasty commute and have to deal with building-rattling takeoffs and landings every minute (there's another design question -- how does an architect compensate for that?).
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