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Germany is ready to dispense "billions of euros" to promote the deployment of plug-ins autos so that a million of these vehicles are registered nationwide by the end of 2020. According to Reuters, in addition to massive amounts of spending, Germany is supposedly working on preparing incentives to boost electric vehicle sales.

Later this month, German Chancellor Angela Merkel will reportedly sign off on legislation that eliminates the motor vehicle tax on plug-in vehicles for the first ten years of registration, Bild newspaper reported last Thursday, without citing its sources. The newspaper further claims that taxes on plug-in vehicles used for work purposes would be reduced substantially, making them as attractive – financially, anyway – as conventional vehicles. Finally, the paper says that the German government intends to buy thousands of plug-ins outright.



Photos copyright ©2011 Drew Phillips / AOL

[Source: Automotive News – sub. req.]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 22 Comments
      Marcopolo
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is very welcome news. Germany was lagging behind in the EV market. The reasons for the German makers lack of interest in EV's probably stems from a number of factors. German automakers are predominately involved in the manufacture of expensive, high quality, highly engineered, high performance (High Profit) automobiles. German Electrical supply has traditionally been quite expensive. Germany was the first to heavily invest in Hydrogen technology. Germany is still trying to make Hydrogen competitive with BEV. The Autobahns encourage high speed travel. But two German Automakers will be pleased with Merkels policies, GM Opel and Ford Tanus. But the other German car makers had better start to compete quickly, or Germans will start to drive French built EV's!
      • 3 Years Ago
      With electricity in Germany costing $0.30 kwh due to their insane infatuation with ineffective renewables, the cost over 10,000 miles at 3 miles/kwh would be $1,000 for electricity alone, and then you have the battery depreciation to cover. That explains the German car industries interest in fuel cells, as you avoid their absurd electricity generation system and instead of getting the electricity from very dirty brown coal, which is what actually powers Germany in spite of the bs about renewables which simply have the effect of making coal use expensive instead of cheap by loading it with costs from a very silly idea, you can simply produce fuel from reforming natural gas, the other real energy source which they import from Russia.
        Marcopolo
        • 3 Years Ago
        Brown coal production in Germany, has halved since reunification. However, Swedish, and US mining companies want to restart the old Brown Coal open-cut mines in Saxony and Pomerania. Australia which is a major exporter of High grade steaming coal also has about 25% (240,billion tonnes) of the worlds proven reserves, and is determined to dig it up and turn it into electricity. The four largest power generating plant on the continent are brown coal fired and the power plants transmit power thousands of kilometres, by overhead power cables. Ironically, Australia is probably one of the nations most ideally suited for alternate power generation.
        normkr
        • 3 Years Ago
        What benefit is there to reforming natural gas to make hydrogen for still very expensive fuel cell cars when there are competitively priced cars that run on natural gas directly? The capital costs of renewables may be more than those of fossil fuels for a while but their operating costs is very low and capital costs are dropping while the extraction and delivery costs and health impacts of fossil fuels are rising. Germans are well known for technical competence and commitment to sustainablility. They know what they're doing.
      Dave D
      • 3 Years Ago
      Has anyone else noticed a trend in EV/plugin vehicle support lately :-) This train is huge and has a lot of momentum now.
        Dan Frederiksen
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dave D
        I have only noticed a near total stagnation the last couple of years. the Volt is from 2007. same with the Leaf. and even those two are competing to see who can produce the fewest cars. not to mention ridiculous pricing.
          Ben Crockett
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          Do you think the first automobiles or first ipods were cheap. Cost will come down over time as investment & mass production ramp up which is starting to happen now.
      Dave
      • 3 Years Ago
      This makes no sense. In Germany, gas costs over $8 per gallon (most of that cost being taxes). If thats not enough subsidy for BEVs, then BEVs are hopeless. "A litre (0.26 gallons) of unleaded gasoline costs 1.53 euro ($2.18) in Germany, nine euro cents less than at the end of April, Bild newspaper reported, citing the falling price of oil. " http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-05-10/german-gasoline-prices-slump-as-oil-falls-bild-reports.html
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      way too little way too late Merkel. a million cars in 10 years wont make a difference and certainly wont avert the peak oil crunch. super lame.
      Nick From Montreal
      • 3 Years Ago
      First thing the German Government should do is force Audi, VW, BMW and Daimler to **sell** at least one 4 seat sedan each. No micro car. No NEV. No lease scheme. No 200K sports car. No two seats car. The German automakers are dragging their feet is a way that's almost criminal.
        Marcopolo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Nick From Montreal
        The last time Germany had a government that 'forced' things, it took a helluva fuss to get rid of it! But hey, The old GDR 'forced' it's car makers, the result was that wonderful piece of engineering, the Trabant!
      harlanx6
      • 3 Years Ago
      2 problems come to mind. Massive shift from fuel based transportation has to result in massive energy demands from some other source. If that source is electricity, where will that energy come from? Since governments have no funds of their own, they have to confiscate assets from their citizens to subsidize a few. That could result in voter resistance. EVs are on a roll, and fuel burners are getting more efficient by the month it seems. Doesn't it occur to anyone that perhaps the government should just stay out of it? Generally anything they do is massively inefficient and always has unexpected and unwanted consequences. It also seems any bureaucracy they initiate never dies, even long after it has long outlived it's purpose.
        Dan Frederiksen
        • 3 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        we will harness the infinite power of the obtuse and ignorant as they oppose change.
          Marcopolo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          C'mon, DF, you flatter youself! Although your obtuse and ignorant, you just lack any, let alone, 'infinate' power!
        Dave D
        • 3 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        As soon as the government stays out of oil, I will be happy to hear it. But they have to stop protecting the pipelines in the Persian gulf region and shipping off the coast of Somalia, the military basis in the middle east, etc. And I love the people who now say that we should not stop the subsidies to the oil industry: So now, the conservative view is that the government does a better job of collecting taxes and giving it out to oil companies as subsidies than the "free market" could do by letting the oil companies just charge for the price it takes to produce their product?!?!?!? Are Republicans/Conservatives even remotely thinking about what they're saying there ROFLMFAO!!! If we're going to do this, then let's really do it and stop all the subsidies and support and government involvement for ALL sides!!!
        paulwesterberg
        • 3 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        Well it takes 7kWh to refine a gallon of gasoline. We can use that power to move vehicles instead. Most cars will charge at night when the grid has excess capacity especially from wind(cannot be controlled) and nuclear(cannot be modulated).
      • 3 Years Ago
      Good for Germany, leading as always...
      guyverfanboy
      • 3 Years Ago
      Porsche Panamera Turbo Plug-in Hybrid please. :D
      Noz
      • 3 Years Ago
      Well at least one government is willing...
      • 3 Years Ago
      That sounds like placing the cart before the horse BMW! Your economies which need repair hve to have injections of billions quick to save a failing Euro. If Spain defauts or others do as Portugal, Ireland, Greece are doing, then the Euro is finished! I suggest you get your priorities straight son!
      Ben Crockett
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is good news. This should spur on BMW / Audi / Porsche to bring more EVs to market considering the domestic market is encouraging them to do.
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