Boeing 747-8 Ultimate Rejected Takeoff test – Click above to watch the video after the break

Modern-day supercars typically come with brake discs and pads made from exotic carbon and steel compounds, and are more than a foot in diameter. As you would expect, they are capable of hauling the exotic machinery they are attached to from speeds of over 200 miles per hour back down to zero with physics-defying alacrity.

But even the most high-tech automotive brakes have got nuthin' on the binders holding back the latest Boeing 747-8 jumbo jet.

To demonstrate the effectiveness of the brakes of its massive aircraft, Boeing ground away every last bit of of the carbon surfaces that normally handle braking duties. In other words, these brakes were ready for replacement and would never even have sniffed a runway in real life. In order to pass the test, the 747-8 needs to stop from 200 miles per hour to simulate an aborted takeoff, and it must do so using only its brakes – no reverse thrusters allowed.

Also, it's worth mentioning that the fully-loaded airplane weighs in at more than 975,000 pounds. That bears repeating: A million pounds!

So, does the million-pound airliner pass this ultimate rejected takeoff test? Check out the video after the break to see for yourself.



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  • 40 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      MJC
      • 3 Years Ago
      To put it in perspective, 1 million pounds would be like taking my A4 and strapping 250 more A4's onto its back...those are some serious brakes!
      Redline
      • 3 Years Ago
      Ooooh anybody got a marshmallow?
      Agilis
      • 3 Years Ago
      Here's the breakdown by Wired Science: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/05/what-happens-when-you-slam-on-the-brakes-in-a-747/ Spoiler alert: There's a lot of Math Involved
        Rotation
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Agilis
        That math is hilarious. He thinks the plane stops in barely over a quarter mile! Also, he estimates the temperature of the brakes by only the external temperature (surface color). The interior temperature will be higher. Still, very impressive stop.
      PSV
      • 3 Years Ago
      It's amazing what modern engineering can do. Also, HOLY TIRE/BRAKE SMOKE BATMAN!
      Evanivitch
      • 3 Years Ago
      Here's a Video for a rig testing of an A380s brakes,gives you a close up idea of what's going on! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m1dv_y_3EK0
        NightFlight
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Evanivitch
        I came in to post the EXACT same thing. The French are funny, this video is actually pretty darn funny as well. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRzWp67PIMw
      4gasem
      • 3 Years Ago
      I've seen these done previously and they are without a doubt AWESOME!!!
      Bassracerx
      • 3 Years Ago
      Good job fags. They need to be un-annexed from our country!
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        Zoom
        • 3 Years Ago
        You mean private company that has always lived and breathed government contracts?
        John
        • 3 Years Ago
        Without the government these private companies wouldn't exist. The government propped up the commercial airline industry during WWII and beyond to gain air superiority. If you don't like that you should crack a history book and see what's been happening for the past 60 years
          • 3 Years Ago
          @John
          [blocked]
        • 3 Years Ago
        [blocked]
        emperorkoku
        • 3 Years Ago
        There is nothing sad or scary about that. A labor dispute -- big deal. They happen.
        dave and mary
        • 3 Years Ago
        I didn't vote for him. But somebody did.
      ICantDrive88
      • 3 Years Ago
      THAT'S the kind of engineering we need in our road-going cars! Especially the cheap ones with drum-brakes. I want to know that in 15-20 years when the Cruze is a hoopdy, different color doors and all, it will still brake well even thought the 16 year old Mcdonalds fry chef never did anything in terms of maintenance.
        Epilonious
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ICantDrive88
        It is on road going cars. Like the Bugatti Veyron and the Mercedes SLR. But since most people don't want to pay thousands and thousands of dollars for high-quality ceramics... they settle with front disc, rear drum, and raybestos... and do fine most of the time since they aren't needing to slow down from 200 MPH or stop their share of 1 million pounds.
        SheldonRoss
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ICantDrive88
        Pretty sure this 747 uses drum brakes.... All big equipment does. Drum brakes are more space efficient for swept area. There's nothing inherently wrong with drum brakes.
          chompiras
          • 3 Years Ago
          @SheldonRoss
          nope, they use packs of multiple carbon discs and pads!!! http://www.boeing.com/commercial/aeromagazine/articles/qtr_03_09/img/2009Q03_article05_opener_image.jpg
      bahill99
      • 3 Years Ago
      LOL, how cool is that: Captain Kirk! :)
      Alex Rodriguez MacFa
      • 3 Years Ago
      I wonder what are the numbers on the skipad??
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