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Ford Fusion Hybrid – Click above for high-res image gallery

The General Services Administration (GSA), which oversees two-thirds of the 600,000-plus vehicles in the U.S. government's fleet, is looking to save millions of dollars per year at the pump by bolstering its use of fuel-efficient vehicles. The 35,000 vehicles ordered by the GSA so far in 2011 consume 21 percent less fuel than the vehicles they replaced, according to the agency. The average miles-per-gallon rating of the U.S. government's fleet of vehicles now stands at 23.4, up from 19.1 in 2010.

The Detroit Three are expected to reap most of the benefits of the government's purchases. GSA administrator, Martha Johnson, says that, "We will be depending on innovative technologies and products coming out of Detroit to help us achieve these goals, and I am confident that American automakers will continue to rise to the challenge." Ford spokeswoman Christin Baker hopes that the Dearborn-based automaker can cash in on the government's fuel-efficient vehicle-buying frenzy, stating "Ford vehicles can be part of the solution for the government as they look to increase fuel economy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions."

This year, approximately 22,000 of the 35,000 vehicles ordered by GSA were advanced technology vehicles (i.e., electric vehicles, hybrids, flex-fuel capable automobiles and plug-in hybrids). Over the past two years, the government has supposedly more than doubled the number of hybrids in its 600,000-plus vehicle fleet.




[Source: Detroit News]


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  • 9 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      The cars being purchased by GSA will come up for auction on http://gsaauctions.gov when they reach about 90,000 miles. Great opportunity to buy used hybrids, we recently bought a 2006 Ford Escape Hybrid with 89,000 miles for thousands under blue-book.
      z28ssx
      • 4 Years Ago
      Keep in mind agencies like the FBI buy a lot of Crown Vics and Tahoes. National Parks services uses a lot of pickup trucks. They will drag the average down. Not everyone is driving a small sedan. What is important is that the number goes up every year.
      erhcanadian
      • 4 Years Ago
      Why is the U.S. government buying Mexican-made cars like the Ford Fusion Hybrid? Shouldn't they buy cars made in the U.S.A. by American workers, like the Toyota Camry Hybrid?
        axiomatik
        • 4 Years Ago
        @erhcanadian
        Everyone focuses on the location of the assembly-line workers, but ignores the location of the engineers, a much higher-value profession.
        throwback
        • 4 Years Ago
        @erhcanadian
        Sounds good in principle, but Ford employees more Americans than Toyota does.
      asiansrule
      • 4 Years Ago
      i don't understand what is so bad about cars made in other countries. They're still good cars. Just because the Ford Fusion being made a la Mexico doesn't mean it's bad.
      • 4 Years Ago
      The idea that the US is in it to keep average Amerians thinking 21 to 29 Mpg is ok is the oil industry standard running things n the West and even has it's standards for europe...In europe 45 Mpg is the standard people live with! --But you know these are serious limits, & they've been broken in the past like up to 1000 Mpg! So now you know the industry is in control of your fuel costs to seriously limit you from new old technology like Battery operated cars which they have slowed in recent years to keep gasoline revenues pouring in making these scumbag oil men happy living high off the hog!
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 4 Years Ago
      only in america is 23.4mpg considered fuel efficient
        dreadcthulhu01
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        Remember that is under the US fuel economy test, which is a lot more pessimistic than the Euro or Japanese tests. Under the Euro Test, that figure would probably be a bit shy of 30 mpg.