2010 Ford Escape – Click above for high-res image gallery

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is currently investigating 2010 and 2011 Ford Escapes and Mercury Mariners due to several complaints of shattering rear glass. According to The Detroit News, there have been 18 reported complaints of the glass braking "simultaneously" while opening or closing the liftgate, and one of the incidents reportedly resulted in the vehicle owner and a 10-year-old child receiving cuts from the glass.

The NHTSA investigation adds that Ford issued a technical service bulletin to dealers last November for 2010-2011 Escape and Mariner models. The TSB states that the incidents tend to occur in colder temperatures, and instructs technicians to inspect the glass for signs of impact or external damage, followed by glass replacement.

The investigation covers 200,000 vehicles built on or before October 15, 2010, but that total pales in comparison to a Ford recall that has already been issued for the same problem. In 2004, Ford recalled 955,000 2002 and 2003 Ford Explorers and Mercury Mountaineers for liftgate glass issues. Ford received more than 5,000 complaints for that recall – far and above what NHTSA has received for this latest issue.



Photos copyright ©2011 Chris Shunk / AOL

[Source: The Detroit News]


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  • 31 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
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        The_Zachalope
        • 3 Years Ago
        The rear glass is different between the first generation and the second generation. It's possible that either it's a bad design, or the supplier making the rear glass is producing a flawed process.
      • 3 Years Ago
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      • 3 Years Ago
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      rsholland
      • 3 Years Ago
      A similar thing happened to my next door neighbor last week, but it was with a new Honda Pillot. It happened as he was walking away from the vehicle.
      rsholland
      • 3 Years Ago
      A similar thing happened to my next door neighbor just last week, but with a new Honda Pilot. It happened as he was walking away from the vehicle.
      jfinftw
      • 3 Years Ago
      No surprise here. Those liftgates on the Escape/Mariner/Tribute rattled worse than a liftgate on a 1989 Chevy Blazer.
      Shawn Porter
      • 3 Years Ago
      Some obvious posters with no idea how cars are designed or built or how the Escape is laid out. Very likely their OEM buggered up on the glass in some fashion. I would hardly call 18 people an epidemic of quality but hey it's the internet everyone needs to get their jabs in. Just make sure to post what your favorite manufacturer is in your comment so the rest of us can return the favour.
        Jim
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Shawn Porter
        no kidding. if it was a design issue, they'd be recalling 2008 and 2009 MY cars too since they're the same design.
        dukeisduke
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Shawn Porter
        Most of the glass Ford uses in this country is made by Ford (Carlite), or at least it used to be.
          Jim
          • 3 Years Ago
          @dukeisduke
          It is, but Carlite doesn't seem to be part of Ford anymore. IIRC it was spun off along with Visteon, then pulled back in for a bit when ACH was formed, and was sold by ACH to some company called Zeledyne.
      Prestige
      • 3 Years Ago
      There's a liftgate engineer that has some explaining to do as the liftgate obviously is flimsy and tweeks so much the glass breaks.
        airchompers
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Prestige
        Obviously? There's so many things that could cause this it's hard for any one thing to be obvious. Note that this is mostly affecting cars in colder climates. Therein, a hint that there might be defects within the glass.
          Jim
          • 3 Years Ago
          @airchompers
          Prestige, the windscreen is a different type of glass. Side glass and backlites are tempered (safety) glass. Tempered glass is "pre-stressed" and the tiniest chip or flaw will cause it to shatter into tiny little bits of glass. It's designed to break in this manner so there are no shards which could stab or slice someone. The downside is that if you don't get the heat-treating or quenching done properly, there could be a latent flaw in the finished piece that will make it just go "POP!" sometime in service. The windshield, on the other hand, is made from regular plate glass which can take minor chips without shattering. But if it were to shatter- say it got hit by a sizable rock- it would break into big shards like any other standard glass. So the windshield is actually a sandwich, with a bonded layer of PVB between two sheets of glass. That way it can chip or crack, and the PVB holds it together.
          Prestige
          • 3 Years Ago
          @airchompers
          No necessarily, if you get a chip on your windshield in the spring you can pretty much drive all summer without a worry, but when winter comes and it gets close to freezing, its almost guaranteed the chip will turn into a crack, it has nothing to do with the quality of the glass. The fact its happening in colder time of year means that the glass is under more pressure from the tweeking of the liftgate structure.
      GoFaster58
      • 3 Years Ago
      There's a glass supplier somewhere that needs to answer a lot of questions.
      Gubbins
      • 3 Years Ago
      Glass "braking"? Did the proofreader take the morning off again?
      Xedicon
      • 3 Years Ago
      I would've thought that the rear glass in vehicles would have to be safety glass like the windshield - guess not.
        Jay
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Xedicon
        The rear glass is the ONLY panel where safety glass is not required by DOT.
          dukeisduke
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Jay
          AFAIK, the only "safety glass" (laminate) in cars nowadays is the front windshield. The rest of the glass is tempered glass, which breaks into tiny pieces. This case might be an issue with the tempering process.
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