Unless you suffer from the kind of neurological defect that causes you to turn into a grinning fool every time you hear an engine bounce off of its limiter, you might not be entirely happy to have a rally school set up shop next door. DirtFish Rally School in Snoqualmie, Washington has made a name for itself as one of the best venues in the country to learn your way around a steering wheel, but according to The Sno Valley Star, not everyone's thrilled with the institution's success.

Local residents have complained of noise from both cars and the school's PA system after DirtFish recently hosted the Global RallyCross for ESPN. The school obtained a special two-day permit from local authorities for the event.

DirtFish president Ross Bentley said that the event was within the county's noise limits, and that all operations had ceased by 6 p.m. the evening of the RallyCross. Most days, events wrap up at 5 p.m. or earlier. Legitimate problem or much ado about nothing? Feel free to sound off (pun sadly intended...) in the Comments.

[Source: Sno Valley Star]


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  • 17 Comments
      Stuka87
      • 3 Years Ago
      If they are not breaking any laws, whats the big deal? They must not be breaking rules if they were given a permit. There is always people that complain.
      Nathan Novak
      • 3 Years Ago
      I actually have never heard anything from DirtFish ... and I live here in Snoqualmie. What's worse is the outside summer concert series from the casino up the hill - there's only so many bands who were popular 30 years ago that you want to hear. :-) Heck even the Snoqualmie Valley Railroad's historic tran rides make more noise since they have to blow the whistle at every RR crossing ... which happens all throughout the day and is heard all throughout the Valley. There was a lot of discussion locally when DirtFish was announced, and we all had a lot of concerns (myself included). They we found out that the cars are street legal (including noise protections), and the events would be over by the time most of us come home in the evenings. We all dropped our concerns and looked forward to the track opening. The lumber mill closed MANY years ago and there's really not much economic activity in the town (it's essentially a bedroom community for Seattle, Bellevue and Redmond). I think it's great and hope to learn how to power-slide some day. :-)
      Samuel Jih
      • 3 Years Ago
      I don't even think people who live near railroad tracks ever complain! Some people need to stop whining over these small things.
      Redline
      • 3 Years Ago
      Haters gonna hate.
      Hazdaz
      • 3 Years Ago
      As a car enthusiast, I love the sound of engines and the idea of speed and pretty much everything about cars... BUT I can also see where that can get REAL annoying if I'm at home trying to relax, sleep, eat, watch TV, etc. Hell, I already curse to myself every time this one dipsh!t in the neighborhood drives by (and he does it a LOT) with a riced-out fart-can and he just revs his engine over and over and over again. Its probably within noise limits, but it starts getting very annoying to hear. So I could definitely see why neighbors would be pissed even if its within noise limits. Those limits tend to be set for one-off sounds, not a CONSTANT noise. DirtFish would be smart to make friends with their neighbors. Invite them to watch/participate. Plant some trees/bushes that absorb some of the sounds. Put up a fence. If they continue to be dillholes about the problem and not own-up to it, they shouldn't be surprised if their patrons start getting harassed by local law enforcement going to, or coming from events, or if zoning issues start to creep up.
      Dapper_Otter
      • 3 Years Ago
      IMO it's decided by who was there first. If the residents were there before the school, then I'm afraid I'd have to side with them. If the school was there first then the residents should GTFO. In MI, we have a similar issue at Waterford Hills raceway. People went and built their big new homes right up against the track's property (track has been there for ages) and then they go and start bitching about the noise. Protip: If you want quiet, don't go and build your house next to a road course.
        Hazdaz
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dapper_Otter
        See, I can agree with this... if the track had been there for ages, then if you build some new homes, don't expect for them to be quiet. And if they are the typical McMansions, chances are they are all crowded together, with a bare minimum of trees so nothing is there to absorb the sounds.
        wilkegm
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dapper_Otter
        at Waterford, there's a simple compromise- cars have to conform to noise level restrictions. Since DirtFish is a school, there wouldn't be any detriment to running mufflers. The local noise ordinances have to be followed, and they should be able to do that, outside of possible (permitted) special events.
      Hashiryu
      • 3 Years Ago
      How is that a neurological defect Autoblog?
      Adamnski
      • 3 Years Ago
      If the events are over that early then what the big deal?
      Zach
      • 3 Years Ago
      Some people have suggested that DirtFish plant some trees or bushes and put up a fence...I don't really have any idea what good a fence is supposed to do, but DirtFish is located completely within the bounds of an old sawmill, which itself is surrounded by forest. Directly to the north of the mill site is a working gravel pit. Here's an overhead of the place: http://maps.google.com/maps?q=47.538108,-121.8116&num=1&t=h&sll=47.576526,-121.951675&sspn=0.373351,0.891953&ie=UTF8&ll=47.540803,-121.815462&spn=0.011675,0.027874&z=16 The marker is at DirtFish's offices; the mill the area directly west. During the GRC event, the course was confined to the area between the DirtFish offices on the east, the east-west oriented warehouse to the north (that's the warehouse the cars drove through), the arc of grass to the south, and the muddy ditch halfway between the DirtFish offices and SE Mill Pond Rd to the west. The only homes that might overlook the mill, as the woman in the article claims, are the ones about a half mile northwest of that area...sandwiched between the mill and the gravel pit. There are plenty of trees, and shrubberies to satisfy a battalion of Knights who say "Ni." The rest of the homes in the area are either on the other side of the river or behind a ridge. The people at DirtFish are ecstatic that they got the permits to start their school at a great location, and they've got a great facility (there's a two-post hydraulic lift on the edge of the property where they drive the cars up for the sole purpose of hosing off the undercarriage - brilliant!). They don't want to blow it by pissing off the neighbors, and from everything I've heard they've done a good job of this. The GRC event brought a lot of attention to them and to Snoqualmie (watch the coverage; they mention Snoqualmie a lot more than they did DirtFish. Also watch the coverage because it is pretty sweet watching a '90s CRX stay right on the tail of a 996 GT3 for three laps), not to mention food, lodging, and gasoline for dozens of competitors, their teams, the officials, the ESPN coverage team, and all the sponsors. There were tons of cheap tickets available for anyone who looked (I paid $12 for both days), and everyone there loved the fact that local guys were putting on a great show in the 2WD class. Now, if you want an example of car engines cutting into your peace and quiet, feel bad for the saps at Heron Lakes Golf Course in Portland - they had to try to save par while I raced against 50 other crapcans next door! https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/216492_10150153350398992_281530008991_6712714_1408698_n.jpg
      ThinkAboutIt
      • 3 Years Ago
      That's the danger of rally racing. When you're banging gears and buzzing at redline in what others consider a quaint, bucolic setting, people are going to get upset when you spoil the silence. Hopefully the school can work this out. It's a one-time toward annual event and it was properly permitted, so the school has that going for it. Before it happens again, maybe they should roll through the area and offer something like free tickets or a community barbecue before the event. Kinda like inviting your neighbors before you throw a rowdy party. You'll build goodwill in the neighborhood and for the few who still complain, you'll have allies and proper public permitting to fend them off. If they still beef, well, f 'em.
      • 3 Years Ago
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