• Apr 28, 2011
2011 Chevy Volt – Click above for high-res image gallery

Is there any car out there that draws more political fire than the Chevy Volt? Sure, people rag on the Nissan Leaf for its limited range and on a bunch of cars – the Murano CrossCabriolet, the Acura ZDX, the Juke – for their styling, but the Volt really seems to have a special ability to get people's claws out. It's almost like they've forgotten all about the Toyota Prius. The main issues are the alternative powertrain and the political effects of the feds bailing out General Motors and issuing plug-in vehicle rebates.

Take, for example, a recent article on Red State titled, "The Chevy Volt: designed for Democratic bureaucrats." Writer Moe Lane attacks the car for being "a glorified hybrid," saying that "the effective gas mileage is somewhere around 27 mpg." That's almost a reasonable argument, especially when compared to some of the vitriol directed at the Volt from people like Rush Limbaugh. Whatever the politicians say, at least one retired member of the U.S. Navy, Vice Admiral Dennis McGinn, is willing to go out on a limb and say: "'Clean' Cars are Patriotic." Still, over on Hot Air, the reasoning goes:

Feel like buying a Chevy Volt? Probably not, thanks to the steep price tag; the car retails north of $40,000, a high price for a subcompact four-seater. What you may not know is that you're already buying Volts, thanks to [the $7,500] tax credit.

Enter our old friend Bob Lutz, who has a new book coming out on June 9. Titled "Car Guys vs Bean Counters: The Battle for the Soul of American Business," the book "puts the Volt birthers and their tinfoil-hat-wearing fellow travelers in their place," writes Motor Trend. MT also quotes Lutz as writing:

Animosity towards the Obama administration is so intense among the right-wing talk-show hosts that any vulnerability, however tenuous, must be attacked and blamed on 'socialist influence', with no regard to truth or to the damage these reckless claims can make to GM, an American corporation, to the dedicated and hard-driving members of the Volt team, and to a now-misinformed public that may be steered away from a transportation solution that would fill their needs perfectly.

Apparently, Lutz doesn't spare those on the left of the political spectrum, but he's really peeved at the right-wing bloviators: "To all the doubters, opponents, critics and skeptics... [including] Glenn Beck, I say: 'Eat your hearts out. Volt is the future'."

[Source: Motor Trend, Red State, FavStocks, Green Car Journal]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 90 Comments
      thepennyracer
      • 3 Years Ago
      as an "enthusiast," the Volt isn't on my radar. Maybe in several years it might be a second car, but as of now it's just too expensive. but I'm okay with that. we have to start somewhere, right? Did you expect this technology to come out of the gate at the same price as an econobox? and the new hybrid infiniti M is apparently wicked fast with great MPG numbers. i almost want to buy a Volt so they keep with it and make more stride.
      Nick From Montreal
      • 3 Years Ago
      Regardless of what some think of him, there's no denying that Lutz is a great product guy. Can't wait to read his book. The promise is fascinating: MBAs have ruined the US car business by trying to optimize for for maximum profits and building cars with minimum style and quality. Obviously profits are good, but it must come from building and selling products that people want. MBAs have no control on the quality of cars, so they play with the numbers until it works for them. Go Maximum Bob!
      • 3 Years Ago
      Personal opinion here of course, but the fact that the Volt comes from GM, which was given loans by the government, and is a plug in vehicle (something one of the largest funding groups on capitol hill, the oil companies, hate) have made it a tool that people of a certain political viewpoint (Rush) wield - however irrational or illogical that club might be. With regards to Lutz and his global warming statement - I'm sure he still stands by it - but Lutz believes in getting the country off oil (don't know if that is from an overall security perspective or what) and I believe that is where his support for electrically powered vehicles comes from. Only some EV fans don't like the volt...I'm an EV fan and think plug-ins are something that will get us to the end game (get the US off oil for whatever reason you like) much faster than if we only had pure EV's. IMHO, they're a stepping stone to where we'll end up once we get battery storage tech where it needs to be in a couple of decades. If the Volt had come from Ford and President Bush had signed the rebate legislation into being then there wouldn't be the mania from that certain section of the political establishment - but its a political weapon that gets some traction (cause the company was bailed out or that certain president signed the rebate into being) so its wielded. JMHO...
        Smith Jim
        • 3 Years Ago
        I agree with everything you said but I would like to ad my opinion about Lutz. You say he wants to get us off of foreign oil. That may be true. I believe his main objective is to make money by building a unique car that people will want to buy.
        Andy Smith
        • 3 Years Ago
        I agree too. I see the volt as you say, as a stepping stone to our future. It eases the petrol heads into electrification by the back door, and covers the downsides in range that some e.v's have.. The next step is obviously cost reduction and then maybe a volt 2.0 with even more battery range and a smaller engine
      • 3 Years Ago
      . The amazing thing is for the last 30 years I have been a Japanese car buyer, not one American Car has ever cast a shadow on my driveway. But now I am interested in buying good old American iron, but it won’t be the Chevy Volt. I like Lutz, I just think the Volt is not ready for the public yet. You see I live in Northern USA, I experience winter and so I need heat in my car for 6 months of the year. Electric motors are very efficient and therefore produce little heat. If the passengers need heat, the power comes directly from the batteries thereby draining them faster in cold weather than in warm weather. This will reduce the distance and time someone can drive in winter. In addition, cold temperatures reduce the ability of batteries to hold a charge in the first place. You hear very little about this from the media or car magazines, you get the impression from these people that battery driven cars will simply clobber gas cars, sorry but that’s simply not the truth. The internal combustion engine has been around for over 100 years, and there are very practical reasons for this longevity. Right now electric cars are good for warm climates only, in cold winters the owners of e-cars will face the harsh realities of their purchase. I wish them good luck if they are driving their frozen electric car in a nighttime blizzard, especially if they have kids in the back and the batteries fail. They’ll watch the toasty warm fossil fuel cars simply cruise right by (if they survive that is). When Lutz says the Volt is the future he’s not kidding, he means the far future. Electric cars are not ready, when they are ready I’ll buy one.
        Smith Jim
        • 16 Hours Ago
        You make a very good point Kent.... NOT! The cold weather performance problem of BEVs is nicely solved by the range extending ICE in the Volt. You can also precondition the interior temperature of the Volt while it's still drawing power from the grid. Furthermore, there is a heated seat option that more efficiently heats the occupants compared to heating the entire car. If you drive more than about 50 miles per day round trip every day then perhaps the Volt is not for you. Assume you drive exactly 50 miles per day and it's a very cold winter day and the range falls to 25 miles. This means you will use no gas on the way to work. On the way back from work the ICE will kick in (charge sustaining mode) which will yield about 37 MPG. No gas on the way to work and 37 MPG on the way home means you will average 74 MPG. This is significantly better than the Prius if you you are one of those people who like to ignore the cost of the electricity. (You may think this is unwise but some people are mainly concerned with getting us off of foreign oil. For these people ignoring the cost of electricity makes sense) Even if you count the cost of the electricity you are probably getting pretty close to the cost, petroleum usage, and CO2 emissions of the Prius. This is the worst case scenario in the coldest weather. (Keep in mind that ICE cars, including hybrids, also experience less fuel economy in cold weather) Things only get better as the weather gets warmer. On mild days you will be able to drive 50 miles without using a drop of gasoline. This means your year-round average MPG will be significantly higher than 74 MPG.
          Smith Jim
          • 16 Hours Ago
          @Smith Jim
          I have to apologize, Ken. I reread your post and it seems that you don't know the Volt is equipped with a range extending internal combustion engine. The range extending ICE is common knowledge among informed car enthusiasts so I just assumed you knew about the range extender.
        Chris M
        • 16 Hours Ago
        As Smith Jim said, the Volt does have an internal combustion engine that can burn gasoline to provide warmth on a cold winters day. But what about a hot summer day? Since electric motors are more efficient and don't produce as much heat, they have an advantage in hot weather. But the notion that batteries are somehow rendered useless in cold weather isn't supported by facts. Several battery vehicles have been tested in cold winter climates and have performed very well. Also, every single IC engine car on the road relies on a battery to start the engine, if it ever got too cold for batteries it would also be too cold for any internal combustion engine car, too!
        • 16 Hours Ago
        herve leger dress on http://www.regilt.com mbt shoes on http://www.tegilt.info
      • 3 Years Ago
      Why can't they just leave politics out of it? I can't stand to read about something and see someone drag politics into it, as if that was in the original intent of the car's designers. Why can't they just realize that the car is more expensive because of different type of engine it has? The batteries? The large amount of extra work required to be put in to making a car like this, for the first time on top of that? I'd rather see my tax dollars being used to encourage people financially to buy more sustainable cars rather than see those dollars being used to pay people big salaries who don't do anything to make our cities better places to live.
        Ford Future
        • 16 Hours Ago
        Why can't they leave politics out of it? Because, if you knew the truth about Global Warming, Peak Oil, OIl Speculation, you'd demand they DO Something. Like shutting down the dirtiest coal plants this year. By demanding oil invest in Wind Power and create jobs in THIS Country, and make the auto industry stop the constant Horsepower race that burns up fuel like it was Golden Taxpayer Subsidized Corn. You might make them Turn this Country Around. They can't have that.
          Marcopolo
          • 16 Hours Ago
          @Ford Future
          Successful Politics and good goverment is the practice of the possible. Ranting and conspiracy theories are the practice of the impossible. Which do you want? you can't have both.
          • 16 Hours Ago
          @Ford Future
          Mr. Soros can you please come pick up your faithful student? Wind power is great if its windy, when its not windy there is no wind power being generated. Peak oil? Have you heard of the abiotic oil theory? I guess not. While peak oil is the excuse they use to increase the cost to the consumer and there is a certain amount of evidence to support it there is also a certain amount of evidence to show that abiotic oil is the truth, of course it might also depend on the location of the well. Second while I do agree small wind turbines would be great if they can get them to function at very low wind speeds and have bunches on the rooftops of tall buildings and if you want on or by your house they are not the answer. Solar panels are nasty to the environment and are also not the answer. If they were then everybody would have them on their rooftops and every building would have them on their roof tops, after all there is a lot of unused real estate that could use a solar panel. Oil speculation is the name of the game, just like gold speculation and silver speculation and currency speculation and you gassing your car up today because you think gas prices are going up tomorrow. I'm not sure why you hate cars so much and despise horsepower because to create more horsepower from an engine you need to make it more efficient, which means getting more power out of one unit of energy. You should be angry at the people who drive SUV's and non work pickup trucks because they are more so part of the reason why gas is so expensive. my daily driver is from 1988 and gets about 32 miles per gallon and its SUPERCHARGED which means it puts out more power. However the "green" consumer who drives his/her lexus hybrid suv because after all its a hybrid but gets ~25 mpg and maybe puts out ~300 hp from its V6 while the Dodge Challenger gets about the same gas mileage but has almost 500 hp but then it does have 2 extra cylinders so if you chop them off how much HP would you have from that v6 (about 350 HP). I'll tell you what. You go ahead and drive your tiny smart (no so) car or your econo box or whatever it is you drive and stop crying because some of us want cars with a lot of horse power. Please research BOTH sides of the argument before somebody tells you what you should think.
        Noz
        • 16 Hours Ago
        Politics is a HUGE part of it. How can you possibly leave it out?
          invisibleblog
          • 16 Hours Ago
          @Noz
          You can't leave politics out when discussing the Volt. The GOVERNMENT owns the company. The GOVERNMENT has to subsidize the sales of the VOLT So, the Volt is a political topic.
          Chris M
          • 16 Hours Ago
          @Noz
          Invisible - the "Government" has already made plans to divest itself of its remaining shares of GM, and it never had sole ownership. Also, those "subsidies" were voted on and signed into law by Bush in 2005, before the Volt project even got started. Hmm, come to think of it, the Republicans still controlled Congress then...
        • 16 Hours Ago
        Only a fool would live in Amerika at this time supporting Obama's war on poor Libyans from the air dropping unguided ordinance worth around 5000 lbs of TNT that hits neighborhoods with Arab children who have never experienced such horror!!! have you?... let alone work there and suppôrt with taxes that distraught lonely arrogant land full of evil spirits and wicked people about to die from God's judgements, because they've forgotten God and run after other idolitrice gods! eric the escapee!
        Chris M
        • 16 Hours Ago
        Eric, you're waaay off topic - and where is your outrage against the military actions by Gaddafi against his own people? Gaddafi and his army have killed far more Lybians than all of NATO combined.
        Marcopolo
        • 16 Hours Ago
        Well said, added to the fact that the Volt breaks new ground with its innovative technology. The Volt also is American, and employs American workers with a vehicle helping to revive US industry at home, while raising US battered industrial prestige abroad. What exactly, can US 'patriots' find fault about in those virtues? Yes, GM was bailed out. But GM pays back, in taxes, employment, oil import savings, tax revenue from millions of US jobs created by the resurgence of GM and the US auto industry. All this from the humble Volt.
      John Harlan
      • 3 Years Ago
      Kudos to GM on the production of this revolutionary design. Will it be improved on? Certainly! Is it the best car for the money? Probably not. In 1958 my Dad bought a 17" color TV for $800. It was extravagant. If GM thought that they would never be able to bring the cost of this system down to being affordable, it would have been a mistake to use their resources to develop it. That is obviously not the case. This is an EV for commuters and a hybrid for travelers. It's is the interim future of cars. By 2050 we may be using an anti-gravity device to power our transportation. What we will be using then may not of even be thought up yet. The detractors of the Volt are criticizing the government subsidies, and in this I agree. It's like the Volt has training wheels. We now have the product (not really yet) so take off the training wheels and see if it falls over.
        Marcopolo
        • 16 Hours Ago
        @John Harlan
        John, the government could argue that the subsidies are a valid use of taxpayer funds, since the return to the government is substantially beneficial. These are not really true subsidies in the form of rebates, but simply a tax deduction for those buyers who are eligible. By this rationale, it would be fiducially irresponsible for the government to cancel the subsidies.
      Marcopolo
      • 3 Years Ago
      Rant, Rant ,snort, rant! What a collection of half truths, distorted facts and downright lies! Too many to answer here, just one will suffice. Volts catch fire? How many ? where ? Thats right none! One Volt was in a garage which caught fire, but no one has established that the Volt caused the fire. So what about all these other Volts? Thats right there are none. Just ranting from a confused mind.
      OldSalt
      • 3 Years Ago
      The Left loves to bitch about Gold plated Pentagon toilets. Well we have a gold plated GM product that took 50 billion in bail out monies to bring to market. If you hate the gold on the toilets how can you love the Volt? Yet the Left loves the Volt. Hypocrites. The Volt is re-volting in terms of price and features. The Prius was priced reasonably low with decent features in its early days and Toyota has only improved it while maintaining the price point. Toyota produced a car that thrifty people could afford. GM produced a car that thrifty people can't afford. At its price point the only people able to afford it are relatively affluent and not all the sensitive to the price of gas. Yet the Volt is pitched to the people who are very sensitive to the price of gas....brilliant! Guess what genius, the sales figures so far are abysmal for the Volt during sky high gas prices. See above for the reasons. It's also a fact that this car would never have existed unless it was paid for by US taxpayers to the tune of some 50 billion dollars. If that is what you want, don't bitch about $1000 hammers bought by the Pentagon.
        Smith Jim
        • 16 Hours Ago
        @OldSalt
        Your post is so filled with BS I don't know where to start. Let's start with the bail out of GM and Chrysler. If GM and Chrysler failed this would have started a chain reaction because their suppliers would fail. Ford and other automakers including foreign brands who manufacture domestically would fail because they use the same suppliers as GM and Chrysler. Ford CEO testified before congress in favor of bailing out GM and Chrysler for this very reason. Why else would a company be in favor bailing out it's competitors? It's really funny when people say the Volt is not selling very well. GM had planned all along to have a slow production ramp-up of the Volt. This is partially for quality reasons and it's very wise IMHO for a car with new technology. GM is selling every Volt it can build and in fact the waiting list is long. The demand for the Volt is far and away higher than GM can supply right now. Several news stories talked about Chevrolet dealers asking several thousand dollars over MSRP for the Volt. Obviously the demand is high. One of the latest news stories about the Volt reveals the Prius is the most frequently traded-in car for the new Volt. Several years ago it was shown that Prius buyers knew they would not be money ahead on the Prius but they purchased anyway because they were concerned about environmental impact. You seem to be uninformed about all of this. It reminds me of a line from a song written by Steve Martin, It goes like this, "Criticize things you don't know about"
          krn0961
          • 16 Hours Ago
          @Smith Jim
          You are absolutely correct. GM planned to build only 8000 in 2011. Automotive News publishes weekly production figures and they are only building 130-175 Volts a week. For comparison, Chevy builds approx 325 Corvettes a week. Do a search on CARS.com, look for new Volts within "all" miles and you'll see that there are roughly 560 Volts out there. Based on a discussion with my dealer, the one they have listed is in route and is pre-sold. We can assume that a fair number, if not the majority, of those listed on CARS.com are also pre-sold. I believe they sold around 600 in March, which means to me that they are selling them at the same rate as they are building them. Based on the waiting lists I know exist, if they built more, they'd sell more. I also read the article that indicated that the Prius was most often traded in on the Volt. This makes sense, and really shouldn't be a surprise to anyone. The Volt is my first American car ever, I traded a VW.
        Nick
        • 16 Hours Ago
        @OldSalt
        @OldSalt " the only people able to afford it are relatively affluent and not all the sensitive to the price of gas". According to you, the middle-class = don't care about gas price / fuel efficiency ???????? Who the F told you that???????? What a misinformed moron.
        Cheddar
        • 16 Hours Ago
        @OldSalt
        First of all, the cost of not spending the 50 billion to rescue America's largest employer of manufacturing jobs would have been horrendous -- In lost tax revenue, lost productivity and a lost strategic resource for our economy. It would be like letting America be invaded because we didn't want to spend the money defending ourselves. Second, what don't you get about tax "credit"? It's not taxpayers' money, it's MY money that I get to keep, helping to build a market for a technology that will help our nation reduce dependence on oil. I don't get the tax credit you do for having kids (which costs the government HUGE) and I don't get the tax credit agribusiness and oil companies get for doing nothing (which costs even more money). So why do you focus on this? Finally, money-obsessed people like you don't understand that saving gas isn't just about saving money. Some of us are principled patriots who don't like sending US dollars to Venezuela or the Middle East. Others prefer not destroying our nation's air or water. We're not "paying more" to do this either, we're simply *sacrificing luxuries* that we don't need for a principle. What sacrifice are YOU making for your country's future?
          OldSalt
          • 16 Hours Ago
          @Cheddar
          I can make the same case about all the waste in the Pentagon budget. So you're for that. Its better to waste taxpayer monies on Lockheed and Boeing and ATK because it avoids the cost of losing jobs? Then hey lets keep all companies from going out of business by using taxpayer monies. Stupid. Cheddar, I said nothing about tax credits but I enjoyed your rant. Money obsessed? Me? I plead guilty to wanting to keep my money. If you have more than you need I'll take some off your hands. If you're not "money obsessed" what was that about "MY money" in the tax credit rant? Hey what is a "principled patriot"? Someone that is a patriot for their own principles? Country not so much? You're for the good old US of A as long as your principles aren't violated? Manly of you.
          Chris M
          • 16 Hours Ago
          @Cheddar
          OldSalt, are you really trying to argue that eliminating "gold plated" waste in the Pentagon would result in "lost tax revenue, lost productivity and a lost strategic resource for our economy"? Maybe you've got some sort of voodoo economics that can explain that, but it doesn't make any sense to me. Not surprised that you don't have a clue about "Patriotism", as that requires some willingness to sacrifice for the benefit your nation, and you appear to be all for yourself and no one else.
          QAZZY
          • 16 Hours Ago
          @Cheddar
          Really, I don't mind paying taxes (unless you want all the roads to be as potholed as Michigan's), but I want to know it gets put to good use (example: I'm not seeing a return on the Iraq War or Israel), I do what I can for my country. The Volt will help forward electric car technology. I think you have a very good point that without those 50 billion spent, there would be a lot of jobs lost, but I believe it's a loan only, so the government is going to pocket some money in the future (hopefully the interest isn't ridiculous, because I don't see GM being able to pay it off anytime soon). Oh American car companies, mixing the thing I hate the most (politics) with something I love (cars).
      Smith Jim
      • 3 Years Ago
      I don't believe in Karma but it's ironic that Bob Lutz, a climate change denier, is catching heat from right wingers. There are also wingnuts on the left who hate the Volt. Chris Paine, the director of the conspiracy theory film Who Killed the Electric Car, has created a lot of GM haters. I can't say that I blame anyone for hating GM if they saw that film. Chris Payne did an excellent job of twisting the truth. A person who knows little about electric cars would easily be fooled by watching WKTEC.
        Noz
        • 16 Hours Ago
        @Smith Jim
        You can't simply dismiss the abysmal reputation of GM as an oil company ***** just because they suddenly built the Volt. Whether you agree with WKTEC or not, it's not that complicated to realize that GM (and the rest of the automotive companies) had no interest in building EVs. The EV1 was more a garage project for some guys at GM that got shut down by people on a much higher level. And whether people want to say I'm a conspiracy theorist or not I don't care...but people at the "top" cross-talk with each other over many industries. That's a fact of life. The bankers, Wall Street, and other money making companies DO NOT do things in the dark. In the same token, oil companies, automotive firms, and such aren't working in a bubble....they work together to prop each other up at our expense.
          Marcopolo
          • 16 Hours Ago
          @Noz
          @ Amida I think if you read mosy of my posts, you will find I definately do 'take a stand' on many issues. But when I do, I back those 'stands' with facts! Not just silly cliched conspiracy theories. In fact if you actually read earlier posts in this very thread you would find my 'stand' on the issue raised in this article. Curiously, hunting back I can't actually find any 'stand' taken by you.
          • 16 Hours Ago
          @Noz
          Umm, because not only did GM cease to produce EV-1's, but so did Toyota, right about the same time. Their Rav4-EV's were definitely not toy garage projects, they are still on the road today. Now, when anyone can see with their own eyes the NiMH patent that Chevron got control of, which explicitly states that EV's on NiMH can go hundreds of km per charge, and you can see on ECD's 2006 annual report a blatant explanation of how this patent manipulation works, and how Chevron and Toyota have entered into "agreements" about the future use of NiMH batteries in EV's, and.... When you can open up the back of your Prius and see a HUGE empty space that could EASILY be filled with batteries to make a plugin hybrid with an additional cost to the vehicle of MAYBE $5000, if Toyota was to do it from scratch, and then you scratch your head as to why they are not offering it to the public, and then you consider how much money Chevron makes off people's addiction to gasoline (I believe their last quarterly profit was around 5 billion dollars), then it's not too hard to put the pieces together and develop a conspiracy "theory".
          Marcopolo
          • 16 Hours Ago
          @Noz
          Noz, you take quite mundane fact's that everybody knows, and then you manage to weave a sinister conspiracy theory .. Of course business people talk to each other. They hold long, and mostly boring, conferences all the time. But so what? Why is this at your expense? If you think something is sinister, tell us what it is, or at least a better method of doing things? Otherwise, you are just griping about stuff you know nothing about and are powerless to change. Why bother? Who cares? Find something positive to write about, (or at least something factually accurate) If you keep going this way you'll end up like poor old Dan F, paranoid, and repeating the same thing over and over again.
          • 16 Hours Ago
          @Noz
          Hey Marcopolo, why don't you ever take a position? You hate everyone else's. Have the guts, take a stand.
        Ben Crockett
        • 16 Hours Ago
        @Smith Jim
        @Smith Jim Well it must be all 'water under the bridge now'. As the both the Chevy Volt and the Bob Lutz star in Chris Paine's latest film "Revenge of the Electric Car". Here is link to a preview / website if you haven't seen it. www.revengeoftheelectriccar.com
          Ben Crockett
          • 16 Hours Ago
          @Ben Crockett
          Apologies for the repost. The commenting system was not showing my post - so I figured it didnt post.
        Ben Crockett
        • 16 Hours Ago
        @Smith Jim
        Well it must be all 'water under the bridge' now. As the Chevy Volt is one the stars in Chris Paine's latest film "Revenge of the Electric Car" which also stars Bob Lutz. Just watch the trailer to see www.revengeoftheelectriccar.com/
        Ben Crockett
        • 16 Hours Ago
        @Smith Jim
        @Smith Jim Well it must be all 'water under the bridge now'. As the both the Chevy Volt and the Bob Lutz star in Chris Paine's latest film "Revenge of the Electric Car". Here is link to a preview / website if you haven't seen it. www.revengeoftheelectriccar.com
      • 3 Years Ago
      What if Chevy Volt is an oil man's dream come true. Could Gm be trying to actually discourage hybrid and ev sales by developing anew kind of vehicle with a confusing adds campaign, adding high cost to it as well as what amounts to developing a small light car which most Amerikans don't like & apparent 27 MPG low milage results?! I wouldn't put it past clever big business to at least sllow perormance & play up adverts with addded hype for a big let down! People stand to loose trillions in oil revenues if gasoline and petrolium products are phased out too fast!
        Marcopolo
        • 16 Hours Ago
        Eric, that a weird alternate universe you live in.
        Nick
        • 16 Hours Ago
        @eric Been doing Meth again?
        Ford Future
        • 16 Hours Ago
        The Volt has great city and short trip mileage. There's no getting around that you can save a lot of money. If you want more affordable there's still the Prius and the Insight [ 47+ mpg at 65 mph highway cruising, and from 40-47 mpg in the city depending on traffic. ].
          • 16 Hours Ago
          @Ford Future
          So what do you do with the batteries when they are at the end of their life (about 5 years or so). I would venture to say they contain minerals and chemicals which are far worse to the environment then a non hybrid car that gets almost the same gas mileage such as a Hyundai Elantra with its 40 mpg highway but because its underpowered it only gets 29mph in the city.
          DrEvil
          • 16 Hours Ago
          @Ford Future
          Here we go with the stupid raw MPG argument again. Find me ANY hybrid with 5K on the odometer, that used less gasoline that a Volt with 5K on the odometer. The EPA ratings applied to this car is an act of morbid stupidity. Don't get taken in by those numbers, they are not realistic. Here is what actual Volt drivers are experiencing: “Volt owners drove an average of 800 miles between fill-ups since the Volt launched in December, and in March they averaged 1,000 miles,” said Cristi Landy, Volt marketing director. “When the majority of miles driven are electrically, gas usage decreases significantly.” “I am surprised how infrequently I go to the gas station. It’s become a game to achieve as many miles as I can in EV mode,” said Steve Wojtanek, a Volt buyer in Boca Raton, Fla. “I have made it my goal to drive as efficiently as possible and I am seeing the results, with more than 3,417 miles under my belt – of which 2,225 are EV miles.” A Volt owner since December, Wojtanek is averaging 122 miles per gallon and visiting the gas station about once a month. “On April 11, I had to buy gas for the first time since filling up on Jan. 9,” said Volt owner Gary Davis of Greenville, S.C. “In my Volt I’ve driven 4,600 miles on 8.4 gallons of gas. That’s an impressive 547 mpg that I am achieving with my Volt.”
          Ben Crockett
          • 16 Hours Ago
          @Ford Future
          @31337 There is a secondary market for the batteries as storage devices that are no longer suitable for vehicles in other applications. Also batteries are recyclable so no need to go to landfill.
      krn0961
      • 3 Years Ago
      I love all these negative comments from folks who have probably never even seen a Volt let alone drive one or spend any time with one. I have had my Volt for 6 weeks. I've driven 1250 miles and have used 3 gallons of gas. If I factor in the cost of electricity, which were live is .09 per k/h, I'm still averaging 180 MPG. The car has been perfect, no issues or glitches. It is smooth, comfortable, very quiet, and really fun to drive. Is it the perfect car that will fit everyone's needs, no. That vehicle does not exist. I'm not sure what 2 Wheeled Menace was referring to when he said that GM over-promised and under-delivered. In my view the Volt does exactly when GM said it would do and has done it flawlessly. Based on the awards it has received thus far, most automotive "experts" agree. Regarding the $7500 tax credit, you are only eligible for the credit if you owe taxes and would only receive a credit up to the amount you owe to a max of $7500. Because of my mortgage deductions, I receive a refund, so that means I am not eligible for the credit. I believe they are looking to change this to a rebate, but that is not the case right now. This credit applies to ALL electric vehicles, not just the Volt. Regarding the fire, I live in CT and a coworker lives in Barkhamsted with friends in the Fire Dept who were there that day. Based on what they saw and said, I have absolutely no concerns. GM has been very forthcoming to Volt owners with info. If anyone thinks that the state fire marshal and AMICA insurance are in the back pocket of GM, give me a break. If the Volt was a fault, we would know it.
      • 3 Years Ago
      It's good GM has developed the Voltec platform that potentially might accommodate alternative energy technologies as they become viable. In November 2010 I had the privilege, courtesy of GM, of driving the Volt in Chicago and talking with some of their design engineers. It was a pleasant experience. But despite the undoubted engineering achievement of the Volt and the fun aspect of driving electrically, the generation 1 Volt, to me, is simply too expensive for most folks. The Volt's LG-Chem 16 KwH lithium-ion battery technology with it's necessary cooling support system may already be obsolete. Even as LG's building a new battery manufacturing plant in Michigan a Berlin, Germany based company (DBM Energie) is already field testing their new lithium metal polymer solid-state batteries that reportedly are safer, have about 3x greater energy density than the Volt's LG Chem battery, allow rapid recharging and, most significantly, may be manufactured at about 1/6th the cost. This is the kind of engineering innovation that genuinely might make electrically powered cars attractive. Instead of being able to "drive up to 40 miles all-electric", the solid-state battery folks might say how about being able to "drive up to 400 miles all-electric, gas range extender optional".
        Pete K
        • 16 Hours Ago
        Yeah, but it also caught fire and destroyed the prototype...unless I'm thinking of the wrong one. It all just sounds to good to be true and typically when that is the case...it is...
          • 16 Hours Ago
          @Pete K
          Here's an April 12, 2011 (German language) interview with DBM's Engineering Director who discusses the warehouse fire and independent third party engineering validations & road tests planned for 2011. He was interviewed by ADAC, a German Electric Mobility consumer group: http://adacemobility.wordpress.com/2011/04/12/interview-mit-dbm-chef-mirko-hannemann-wir-konnten-sofort-akkus-liefern/ According to the interview, the Berlin Fire Marshall's investigation officially reported March 31, 2011 that DBM's Audi A-2 was not the cause of the warehouse fire, it appears to have been arson. Meanwhile, DBM says they're preparing several additional "Kolibri battery" test vehicles for third party road test validations this summer in Germany. DBM's solid-state battery recently passed a major series of engineering tests performed by the independent German Federal government's Materials Research and Safety Institute. More road tests and third party engineering validations should help us learn if DBM's "Kolibri" solid state battery is the real deal.
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