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2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid – Click above for high-res image gallery

Even though there are more hybrids on the market today than ever before, automakers still need to squeeze more cost savings out each one, whether that be by economies of scale or by developing technology in-house. That's the strategy that Ford is using, says Sherif Marakby, the company's director of electrification programs and engineering. With each next-generation hybrid system, Ford aims to cut cost and, according to Automotive News, the hybrid setup in the 2013 C-Max Hybrid will cost 30 percent less than the hybrid hardware found in the 2010 Ford Fusion Hybrid.

How is Ford reducing costs? Well, according to Hybrid Cars, the automaker's cost-cutting strategy works something like this:
  • Ford developed its own in-house battery system that will be manufactured at the automaker's Rawsonville, MI, plant next year. Ford developed everything for the system, from the tooling to the wiring, sensors and controls. All the components are assembled by Ford in its facility. (Battery cells come from Compact Power.)
  • Ford developed its own hybrid transmission, which will be manufactured at a suburban Detroit plant.
  • Ford also brought system integration and software development in-house. The software can control battery and motors, as well as the total system, to achieve maximum efficiency.
  • All the parts used for hybrids and other electric-drive vehicles are made common, and software and control systems are re-used as much as possible.
Need evidence that Ford's cost-cutting strategy is working? Look no further than the 2011 Lincoln MKZ Hybrid. Priced at $35,180, the MKZ Hybrid stickers for the exact same as the non-hybridized, 3.5-liter V6 MKZ. Perhaps that's why buyers are snatching up the MKZ Hybrid at a rate that even Ford didn't expect.


2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid

  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
  • 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid



[Source: Hybrid Cars, Automotive News – sub. req.]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      Nick From Montreal
      • 3 Years Ago
      They forgot one bullet point: * When designing the Focus EV, Ford decided to stuff the batteries in the trunk, thereby limiting the vehicle cargo space. Sorry, couldn't help it...
      Marcopolo
      • 3 Years Ago
      Ford cautious approach is really paying off. This is very good news for US industry, and for the extra 7000 US automobile jobs created by Ford. GM is also scoring successes, now if Chrysler could just get functioning .....
        Dan Frederiksen
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Marcopolo
        not sure that obtuse is the same as cautious.
          Marcopolo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          Since you are an obvious example of the first, it's not surprising you wouldn't recognise the second!
      harlanx6
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is a winner. When you run the numbers on a Fusion Hybrid, They are too expensive to ever recoup the initial expense. If they insist on pricing hybrids many thousands of dollars over the price of their very efficient new straight gas powered cars, they aren't going to be cost effective, and for most, that's what it is all about.
      GoodCheer
      • 3 Years Ago
      Couldn't they PLEASE save some money on chrome my closing off part of the preposterous gaping grill? Just how large are we expected to think the cooling loads for that little engine are? Aesthetics are subjective I know, but to me it just looks incredibly stupid.
        Marcopolo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @GoodCheer
        You are right, aethetics are subjective. The new 'Aston Martin' grill design has received praise and proved popular with buyers and motoring critic's alike. But not everyone likes every vehicle design!
        • 3 Years Ago
        @GoodCheer
        to GoodCheer, That grill isn't open, it's one big piece of plastic trim, so it is very aerodynamic. Just the very bottom portion is open.
          EZEE
          • 3 Years Ago
          Actually - close off the LITTLE grill/opening on top, and all the sudden it starts to look suspiciously like an Aston! And, who wouldn't want an Aston? But yes - seriously - funny comment - I can't imagine it needs that much cooling... :D
      Mike G
      • 3 Years Ago
      This tells us that prices can continue to be driven down. Ford does not have much experience in this area and can build a system in house AND drive costs down. As volumes go up we will see some OEMs producing very low cost electric motors and batteries that the car companies will just buy and place in their vehicles....just like they buy wiper motors and water pumps now.
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 3 Years Ago
      Very nice. So they are doing what GM is doing, but instead it sounds like they are going full hybrid instead of mild. Their powertrains are also top notch in technology as of writing. I think we will start seeing Ford dominate Toyota/Honda in Hybrid sales, and GM could do it if they put their mind to it also.. Wow... what is this, bizarro world?