San Francisco hidden garage – Click above to view video after the jump

The only thing separating this urban San Francisco garage from true brilliance might be the gaudy "No Parking" sign plastered to it. While the sign is definitely useful for keeping pesky commuters from parking in front of your well-disguised garage, it kills just a little of the structure's mystique.

That said, the garage door/facade arrangement's double-hinge operation is nothing short of masterful, and we shudder to think how much time, money and blood sweat and tears the setup took to pull off. Once the door has swung out of the way, it reveals a surprisingly large amount of space, for any number of automotive shenanigans, without the threat of passerby getting a peak at your toys.

For privacy, a drool-worthy D.I.Y. ethic, and not scarring the street with another ugly garage door, this workspace is is right up there near the top of the heap. True, its practical purposes may be somewhat limited, but to those who appreciate this kind of engineering, that should be of little concern. See the garage in action after the jump. Thanks to all for the tips!

[Source: YouTube]





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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 25 Comments
      Andy Cao
      • 3 Years Ago
      from the yahoo headline post I saw this video in a few days ago, which has better explanation and background on why this was built: McMills Construction was working on an investment property on Oak Street, and they were scratching their heads over how to build a garage to enhance the tenant's use of the building. Corey McMills, who's got a background in mechanical engineering, thought of an idea to covert the walls of the bay window into door panels that would fold into the garage space to allow cars to enter. The planning department accepted it. McMills Construction teamed up with Beausoleil Architects to help with the details. As we all know, it's nearly impossible to consistently score a decent parking spot in the Upper Haight. The problem, you see, is that the city planning department had recently started enforcing its mandate to limit changes to the character of historic building's front facades-- especially when it came to converting bay windows into garage doors.
        Andy Cao
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Andy Cao
        i failed at cut and paste: the correct order of the paragraphs: McMills Construction was working on an investment property on Oak Street, and they were scratching their heads over how to build a garage to enhance the tenant's use of the building. As we all know, it's nearly impossible to consistently score a decent parking spot in the Upper Haight. The problem, you see, is that the city planning department had recently started enforcing its mandate to limit changes to the character of historic building's front facades-- especially when it came to converting bay windows into garage doors. Corey McMills, who's got a background in mechanical engineering, thought of an idea to covert the walls of the bay window into door panels that would fold into the garage space to allow cars to enter. The planning department accepted it. McMills Construction teamed up with Beausoleil Architects to help with the details.
      Paradigm ♂♂
      • 3 Years Ago
      Pretty cool.
      who_the
      • 3 Years Ago
      Here in San Francisco, if your property is Victorian or otherwise historically significant, it's very difficult if not impossible to get the city to approve a modification to your facade. So it's not necessarily indulgent or a matter of whim; something like this must be done if you want to add a garage to a historically-significant residential building.
      kevsflanagan
      • 3 Years Ago
      Its like the Bat Cave but in the City!! Badass!
      John Davis
      • 3 Years Ago
      And inside one will find... a Prius for her, a Tesla for him, and a Leaf for the undocumented nanny. On the floor above... the reception room for a liberal fund-raiser. ;)
      tarmacdaddy
      • 3 Years Ago
      the opening is pretty small. i think a better design could have been used to maximized the portal.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @tarmacdaddy
        [blocked]
      budwsr25
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is old news.
      Nick Biancalana
      • 3 Years Ago
      Not really that impressive in terms of mechanism for the doors' movement, I am just a bit curious on how the doors are securely latched together. You've got a lot of leverage on those doors if you were pushing on their edges with the pivot points so far away. Now what I'd be interested in seeing is the opening mechanism (electric actuator? motor/chain/gear?) and any type of internal latches to latch them together. It would even be more impressive if they've managed to power latches and both doors off a single motor/actuator.
      MotorworldHype
      • 3 Years Ago
      It must be Bruce Wayne's house...
      ammca66564
      • 3 Years Ago
      I recall once walking through Pacific Heights and seeing a 280SL in an open garage, and ABOVE IT were the wheels of another car. Parking's at a serious premium in SF. As is common sense.
        Randy
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ammca66564
        There was also a post on AB a while back where someone had a driveway that was basically a hydraulic lift that brought the driveway up with it! That was in the suburbs so I'm still wondering 'why'.... lol Actually couldn't find it on AB but here it is somewhere else http://www.break.com/usercontent/2008/10/lambo-garage-593428
          SPcamert
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Randy
          This person clearly has more money than brains since they put the Diablos on the bottom and the Countache(s) on the top. The Diablo is OBVIOUSLY the better daily driver and therefore should have earned top spot.
      Basil Exposition
      • 3 Years Ago
      Why?
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
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