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When plug-in vehicles are not cruising down the road, "they're home and they're at work" says Larry Nitz, General Motors' executive director-hybrid and electric powertrain. That's precisely why Nitz told Ward's Auto (sub. req.) at the 2011 SAE World Congress that recharging a plug-in automobile in retail parking lots while shopping is "inconsequential."

Nitz says plug-in vehicles will predominantly be charged at two locations – at home and at work. Nitz refers to the work charge as the "golden charge" and says that it could occur "five days a week" and be a "meaningful charge." For that reason, Nitz supports the installation of charging stations at workplaces.

But Frank Wong, a spokesman for AeroVironment, sort of disagrees. Wong claims that it's "presumptuous" to draw any conclusions when plug-in vehicles are just starting to hit the market, stating that, "It's still early to know exactly which business model makes the most sense." So, whose side are you on?

[Source: Ward's Auto – sub. req.]


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      • 3 Years Ago
      Nitz makes a credible argument, for a representative of a company that makes a series plug-in hybrid, like the Volt.. The argument is less credible when it comes to pure EVs... in that case, a charge is a welcome thing, always and wherever you can get it, as long as pure EV range hangs out around 100 miles or less. Wong makes a credible argument, for a representative of a company that makes public charging systems, and Frankly (no pun intended), and as a driver of a pure EV as well as a plug-in hybrid, I'll take preferred public charging anyplace I can find it! Hotels? Conference centers? Parking garages? Malls? Bring 'em on!