• Apr 2, 2011
1981 Rover SD-1 – Click above to watch video after the jump

Charlie Broomfield got bored of working on run-of-the-mill project cars. He always seemed to finish them to quickly, and was never quite satisfied with the results. Charlie needed a challenge to his engineering and fabrication skills.

That challenge came in the form of a donated 1981 Rover SD-1. The SD-1 needed some serious help to be the luxury sport sedan it was when it left British Leyland during the Thatcher era. Instead of restoring the car from top to bottom, though, Charlie purchased a 27-liter Rolls-Royce Meteor engine from a British Spitfire fighter plane. The engine cost Charlie a slim £1,000.

With 600 horsepower and 1,500 pound-feet of Nazi-stopping gusto wedged between the frame rails, the SD-1 will now break 160 mph without going over 2,000 rpm. Almost none of the original Rover parts are left, save the body panels, and Charlie's goal is to crack 200 mph in the 24-cylinder beast before he considers the project done.

[Source: YouTube]



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 36 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      I love it. Wish I could do that.
      • 3 Years Ago
      I was hoping to hear that engine, shame.
      • 3 Years Ago
      What kind of gearbox did it have though? What was able to cope with that torque?
        • 3 Years Ago
        Might have been direct drive
        • 3 Years Ago
        He uses a Leyland bus transmission.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Now if he had the 34 Liter 1800- 2200 hp motor I'd be impressed. I like the Jaguar rims though.
      • 3 Years Ago
      That is a cool project. Who wouldn't enjoy tormenting traffic in that thing?
      • 3 Years Ago
      In the video he says 650 bhp, but in the article it says 600 hp ... please correct :o
      • 3 Years Ago
      Brilliant and fantastic! Exactly what being a gear head is all about. I love it.
      • 3 Years Ago
      "... the MOD are a bit funny like that." Priceless.
      • 3 Years Ago
      I totally agree with DiRF! I love the styling of the SD1 too, 'though I've only seen one in person, many years ago. I was thinking of the SD1 when I chopped this Riviera 5 door "coupe:"
      [IMG]http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c40/artandcolour2006/Photochops/Riviera5doorCoupe.jpg[/IMG]
      • 3 Years Ago
      *650 hp
      *1550 foot-pounds of torque
      *12-cylinder
      *from a tank, not a spitfire

      ...Exactly HOW distracted was the writer of this article?! This almost isn't even funny.
      • 3 Years Ago
      ...an SD1 with a Merlin engine and Leyland bus transmission... if this thing were any more British it'd be eating kidney pie. Really is almost a celebration of a handful of things that made the British manufacturing industry grand.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ davidhoebeeck: Take a few deep breaths and learn to take a joke. What part of "kidney pie" really offends you enough to go off on a paragraph long rant on ignorant Americans? If you said "as American as peach pie" I doubt anyone would blow up at you.
        • 3 Years Ago
        "if this thing were any more British it'd be eating kidney pie."

        OK, that made me laugh.
        • 3 Years Ago
        And if it was American it would be ignorant of the world around them. "Kidney pie"? The dish is called steak and kidney pie, no one eats just kidneys in a pie. Also the much more traditional dish is steak and kidney pudding. In fact it would be far more accurate to say as English as apple pie because we eat more of that particular dish and yes we invented it. Go steal you cultural icons elsewhere.
        • 3 Years Ago
        If its got buggy electricals then its the whole package! :D
      • 3 Years Ago
      I really like the attitude of the builder, Charlie Broomfield. He has a kind of contentedness with what he's done and what he does that is both a hard-work-is-its-own-reward satisfaction, and is uniquely his. Certainly this isn't the type of project most would dream up, and it wasn't for money, competition, bragging rights, or advertising--Broomfield just did it because it makes him happy. With his motives so pure, no one can take that satisfaction away from him, no matter how they feel about his creation. I find people of this determination and focus to have some of the most intriguing personalities out there.
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