• Mar 29, 2011
Think City – Click above for high-res image gallery

Back in November of 2010, we reported that, come mid-2011, the electric Think City will hit the U.S. market at a price that's "just below $34,000 before incentives." While that price tag may still be accurate, that's not what the first 100 Think Cities will sell for. You see, Think's "below $34,000" price is just a "target" that the automaker aims to hit when the City launches at normal retail, but the first 100 Cities are burdened with a heftier $41,695 sticker price.

Think told Plugin Cars that the $41,695 price is only for the low-volume run of cars that the automaker is shipping out to fleets and select individuals. It is not the price at which the Think City will sell for when production ramps up and the general public gets a crack at buying it. Making matters even more confusing, Think told Plugin Cars that for buyers in Indianapolis, the City's current transaction price is $30,050.65. Apparently, that includes state sales tax and available state rebates, but not the $7,500 federal tax credit. So, what's the City's actual, official MSRP? That's still unknown.




[Source: Plugin Cars]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 26 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      I feel bad for Think on this, not that I want one particularly. This is the car that was designed and almost finished under Ford (back when California required electrics in the late 90's) - the update to the Think of that time - which Ford then sold Think after that requirement was nixed. The vehicle has been in a state of suspended production for years and years.

      It could have been the first relatively available and lower priced EV (for years) and had the market to itself basically. But now, years later, it has to start selling while competing with the Leaf etc. (much more capable vehicles) and instead of being the first relatively successful (in numbers) EV - its going to be fighting to even be considered by buyers.

      If it was going for $25k before the tax credit it might have a chance, but up near $30k nobody in their right mind would choose it over a Leaf when the Leaf is the same price or less. At $40k who even would want one? Sorry Think, you missed the opportunity by about 5 years....
      harlanx6
      • 3 Years Ago
      If you could wait for a Tesla model S, for another 10k or so, at least people wouldn't laugh at you.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        Compare it to the Leaf, not a car that is vaporware.
        harlanx6
        • 3 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        If the Volt can be leased for $350/mo, that's pretty compelling.
        harlanx6
        • 3 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        Dam good point John H.
        harlanx6
        • 3 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        This car might have had a niche 3 years ago at that price, but now the competition is going to be brutal for that space, and a $40K+ glorified golf cart just isn't going to sell. Though we have been patient for several years here, one still can't go down to the EV dealer, get their screwing in the salesman's little office and drive home in an EV, but in a year or 2, there should be many alternatives, and I might add, some of them look like pretty good stuff.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        Yeah, like a lot of other EV startups, they failed to launch soon enough.

        My sense is that, onece the Leaf & Volt launched late 2010, that was when the window started to close in the market, and it's only going to get tougher from here on out.

        If you're small, and don't have a halfway competitive product to launch right *now*, while the Leaf & Volt are still ramping up, you might as well shut your doors.

        harlanx6
        • 3 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        The Leaf could be the finest pure EV on the market for the money, but it does have range limitations which the Volt has addressed. The Volt has the capabilities of todays fuel powered vehicles while still offering the economy of electric powered commuting. The Leaf may be the best commuter while the Volt has versatility. There is a world of difference between them and they appeal to a different market. The subsidies they enjoy are temporary, and they will soon have to compete in the market on the basis of merit and price.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        Or, for basically the same money, you could buy a Volt with more seats, more space, integrated ER, national service network and long-term warranty support.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @harlanx6
        Wow! $$41.7k for what looks like a vehicle meant to be driven by Barney Rubble. Don't Th!nk so...

        But at least it's another EV on the "market." Few people will buy this - as johnh notes you could buy the Volt with two hefty rebates ($5k in Cali) for a lot less and get a LOT more. You can also lease the Volt for a reasonable $350/month payment and get a LOT more.

      • 3 Years Ago
      It might, emphasis might, be worth a look as a runabout in areas where the roads are heavily salted, as the plastic body means that at least many of it's parts should survive that well.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Bwahahahaha!

      More electric comedy...
      • 3 Years Ago
      They've GOT to be kidding!
      • 3 Years Ago
      Think has sold 10,000 cars over the last 20 years. They presumably know how to accurately estimate remaining range, which Nissan apparently does not, according to recent reports. The "current transaction price is $30,050.65" before the Federal rebate. If it was not for the 3.6 kW max charge rate (just as pathetic as the Leaf) I would consider it. The plastic body panels mean it will outlast anything else on the market. Total cost of ownership over 30 years could make the competition look ridiculous. Plus, being engineered in Norway, I bet they handle cold temperatures better than the typically under engineered Japanese cars. We will see. Too bad they do not offer the molten sodium battery in the US, like they do in Europe. 100% coulombic efficiency I hear.
        • 3 Years Ago
        You make some good points.

        The point you make about the body work is a great one.

        When I think of a EV I reckon that you need to think (no pun intended) of the EV different to a conventional gas car with has a lot more parts count meaning a lot more wear and more things to break.

        The main replaceable will continue to be the battery but as battery prices continue to drop and batteries last longer the replacement cost will be relatively less than an ICE over it's lifetime.
      • 3 Years Ago
      serial bankrupter going for a 4th? time. I believe they'll succeed.

      it's terrible to watch so many companies burning so much money making choices with no chance of success. tic toc the years of humanity go by.

      I'd say they should go light weight and aerodynamic but it's not a start up company, they're too far gone. death seems given.

      sigh :) when is someone going to do it right. like ultralight lemans prototype style 2+2 seater EV. the compatible synergetic confluence of efficiency, cost optimization and performance. the obvious key to EV viability. or is a 40k$ city car better..
      • 3 Years Ago
      New rule. An EV cannot cost more than twice what the car looks like it should cost. This car looks like it should cost maybe $11 or 12 grand. Can't cost more than $24 grand. Leaf looks like $18 grand. $36 grand is in the ball park. Volt looks like maybe $20 grand and that is stretching it. Not that much better looking than the Cruze. It looks like it costs too much.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Even $30k for this car is a fail.

      Why do they bother ?
      • 3 Years Ago
      With Th!nk City at EUR 40K from local car dealerships (few ask for EUR 50-60K), the Tesla Roadster (EUR 89K + taxes + shipping) doesn't sound that bad with Nissan LEAF not available (yet).
      • 3 Years Ago
      "So, what's the City's actual, official MSRP?"

      I'm sure it's a decent vehicle, but like every other independent-made electric (with the exception of Tesla, though the Model S remains to be seen), the answer is "too much." You simply can't compete with automakers that have the massive overhead infrastructure necessary already in place, and who can afford to amortize the cost of their early electric models across their range of profitably hum-drum gasoline-driven cars and trucks.
        • 3 Years Ago
        At $41+k, they can't even compete with an automaker like GM who _can't_ afford to amortize the cost of their early electric models across their range of profitably hum-drum gasoline-driven cars and trucks, to say nothing of an automaker like Toyota *did* subsidize their hybrids & EVs against their overall profits.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Why would anyone want this car over a Nissan Leaf, even at MSRP?
        • 3 Years Ago
        You wouldn't. The Leaf crushes the Think EV, even without factoring the Leaf's lower price.
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