• Mar 22, 2011
2010 Chevrolet Camaro SS – Click above for high-res image gallery

General Motors is ready to bring some muscle to the Chinese market. For the past 44 years, we've called it the Camaro. China, however, will get the bad Bowtie two-door wearing a new name. It will be called the Ke Mai Luo (科迈罗), which GM insists is a "sonorous Chinese name." We tried running Ke Mai Luo through Google Translate but wound up with nothing. Any Chinese-speaking readers feel free to enlighten us in the comments.

The CDM Camaro will get the 3.6-liter V6 engine, which is good for 312-horsepower and can be paired with either a six-speed manual or six-speed automatic transmission. No word yet if the V8 will make its way over as well. The Ke Mai Luo is going to start at approximately 500,000 Chinese Yuan, or a tidy $76,267 U.S. dollars. Check out the official press release after the jump.



Photos copyright ©2011 Drew Phillips / AOL

[Source: General Motors]
Show full PR text
Camaro Officially Named科迈罗 (Ke Mai Luo) in China
2011-03-22

Earlier today, SGM announced that Chevrolet will introduce the legendary Camaro sports car at Auto Shanghai 2011 in April. The Camaro will have a sonorous Chinese name - 科迈罗 (Ke Mai Luo). The Ke Mai Luo with a 3.6-liter engine will be priced around RMB 500,000.

In recent years, China's luxury sports car market has been flourishing, highlighted by the midsize luxury segment (priced at RMB 400,000--800,000), which grew 141% in 2010. At present, this segment is dominated by cars with European design. The Camaro, with its "masculine" styling, will be a welcome addition.

Additional details about the Camaro will be announced at the Shanghai auto show.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 71 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      It's too bad the last word is second tone rather than fourth, or it would sound a lot like the phrase "to drive a beautiful road."
        • 3 Years Ago
        I keep thinking about trying to learn Mandarin, but then someone goes and says something like this, and I decide that it's probably impossible for me (my German, which is basically English with more systematic grammar, was OK, but didn't come too easily for me).
        • 3 Years Ago
        I guess the tone on the first word is also not the right one for the translation I provided. If I'm not mistaken, it's first tone and would also need to be fourth for it to sound like the sentence I suggested. Oh well, would've been cool anyway.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Does anyone notice why they only sell V6 engine? Does anyone know that in many countries outside US, their govt tax the car from how big the car engine size. So if you own a car with big engine V6 and above usually pay higher tax because they don't encourage you to buy thirsty cars. Unlike US the rest of the world paying a real gas price which is more than $7 per gallon so if everyone in this world drive V6 and above then the oil will definitely deplete faster. So please be realistic people wait till you guys must pay more than $7 like the rest of the world and just wait and see if any of you still driving V6 or V8 engine cars/trucks
      • 3 Years Ago
      @Bloke: I'll be guldammed... I apologize for my ignorance on the matter...

      You may be right about the Japanese automakers knowing how to adapt to the needs of their fellow countrymen better than anyone... but it also doesn't hurt that there is still a very strong intrinsic xenophobic aspect to their culture.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Translated it means "Watching Mustang GT taillights pass by at high speed"
        • 3 Years Ago
        Apparently "Camaro" is derived from a french word for companion.
        • 3 Years Ago
        200% tariff is rediculous. I hope no one buys their cars when they finally make it stateside.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Its only a V6, give it a break. :P
        • 3 Years Ago
        Ke Mai Luo = Bloated & Cheap Plasticy Toy
        • 3 Years Ago
        It actually translates to "enjoy idling through your whole gas tank in that beijing traffic jam"
        • 3 Years Ago
        We're all talking about what "ke mai luo" means in Chinese... WTF does "camaro" mean in English!?

        The answer is nothing. Neither of them mean anything, neither are composed of real words.
        • 3 Years Ago
        They always phoneticize things for the Chinese market, so this isn't really new just for the Camaro or anything...all the cars sold in China also have names in Chinese characters.
        The really good phoneticizations manage to have appropriate and positive meanings behind them as well as sounding similar. For example, Coca-Cola managed to translate itself to Ke Kou Ke Le, which roughly translates as "delicious happiness" (this isn't an exact translation, the actual words are more about your mouth and happiness but that's basically the gist of it is that if you drink coca-cola you'll be happy). The Toyota Camry also has a fairly good translation into Kai Mei Li, which roughly translates into "beautifully triumphant."
        So the goal is usually not only to phoneticize it but to get a really positive vibe out of it.
        • 3 Years Ago
        There is no translation; it is the auditory equivalence to saying "Camaro", but in Chinese...much like Romaji for Japanese. EX: Box translated in Romaji would be Bokkusu.
        • 3 Years Ago
        It means, "Good luck in Beijing finding a big enough parking space."
        • 3 Years Ago
        This is like 'Asians in the Library'. Ha! I can see the UCLA chick on YouTube wondering why they can't speak American if they are going to buy an American car.

        Seriously, it's good to see GM thriving. Good luck!
        • 3 Years Ago
        Nah, probably means "Chevy sold 7.6k more Camaros than Mustangs last year. Now, give us your Yuan and wuxia movies!"
        • 3 Years Ago
        On the serious side, if you pronounce it in Mandarin, it is just a phonetic translation of "Camaro". (I admit I have to convert that simplified into traditional though lol, 科邁羅)
      • 3 Years Ago
      I hope to see Tosh put this on his "Is it racist" segment...
        • 3 Years Ago
        He'll say,

        "That's the sound you'll hear when all those bike pedestrians get smashed by that massive grille.
        KE MAI LUO!"
      • 3 Years Ago
      That... seems... EXPENSIVE.
        • 3 Years Ago
        If it were a matter of only tariffs, you guys would have a valid point, however, it's far more complicated than the vast majority of us understand. South Korea and much more so Japan are extremely protectionist far more than even the US and the UK were in the fifties or sixties. Even if, and I say "if", Ford or GM made the absolute perfect car of quality exeeding that of anything ever built exclusively for the Japanese or SK market and half the price of the lowest cost competer they would have no chance in hell of ever gaining any respectable market share. The Japanese have no tariffs but the taxes and inspection fees can exceed the price of the car and often do.

        http://autos.aol.com/article/japan-bias/
        • 3 Years Ago
        Welcome to the world of extremely-high protectionist imported car tariffs. Most Asian nations have them.

        Ever wonder why all non-Japanese manufacturers *combined* only hold a single-digit-percentage slice of the new car sales pie in Japan?
        • 3 Years Ago
        What nation allows stupid high tariffs against it's products and Does Not Counter with it's own high tariffs?
        Any guesses?
        • 3 Years Ago
        "Ever wonder why all non-Japanese manufacturers *combined* only hold a single-digit-percentage slice of the new car sales pie in Japan?"

        Perhaps you could glean everyone in on this, since Japn imposes absolutely no import tariffs on cars or commercial vehicles. You might want to think along the lines of stipulations on Japanese consumers - especially parking and taxation - and see how Japanese manufacturers adapt to those constraints, instead.
      • 3 Years Ago
      I dunno, i think a camaro is a camaro no matter where you sell it.
      Kinda disrespectful to change the name.
        • 3 Years Ago
        That would be equivalent to us buying a car named as トヨタ・カムリ instead of Camry.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Are you serious? It's just being phoneticized so people in China can pronounce Camaro, get the damned stick out your butt. Every single car sold their has a Chinese name, because people there speak Chinese. Nobody sells cars here with their names written in Japanese or Korean, give me a break.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Are you stupid Autoblog? Ke Mai Luo = Camero it doesnt MEAN anything... Thats like saying "We translated Bobby and coudnt find any definiton"....

        • 3 Years Ago
        I thought it too. Sometimes in Chinease you can't translate a word, so you use the sonority to write it(I know that cause I had a chinease teacher and he explained how to write our names in chinease).

        So this is like Camaro, but using chinease sonority things...
        • 3 Years Ago
        well they were calling people stupid so I found it hypocritical.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Good thing we are talking about the Camaro and not it's evil twin the Camero!
      • 3 Years Ago
      Waiting for the video of a Chinese owner smashing his new Camaro when it breaks down!
      • 3 Years Ago
      Well, I come from Hong Kong and am the Chinese Speaker. Literally "Ke Mai Luo" (科迈罗) has no exact meaning in Chinese at all.
      In Chinese, we mainly have "Mandarin" & "Cantonese". When you spell out "科迈罗" in "Mandarin", it pronounces similar to "Camaro" in English. This is the only related thing between Chinese & English.

      If you really need the meaning of "科迈罗", it is combined by three identical words.

      科 in English means Subject / Family [Biology], normally it needs and other words to make it meaningful, liked adding “学” behind to make it as "科学“ = Science.

      迈, again, it needs additional words to make it meaningful. e.g. “向”, 迈向 = reaching into

      罗, it is one of the Chinese surname, and also, if additional words come after it, will make it has different meaning.

      In conclusion, GM just using pieces of different Puzzles to combine into one. Which means, meaningless!
        • 3 Years Ago
        I just wonder when they don't use some other meaningful Chinese words.
        E.g. 開美樂 = Pretty & Happy to drive
        Through it is a little bit childish, but it is better than "meaningless" at all.
        Chinese are quite concerns on "Lucky Wordings".
        Bad Marketing~
      • 3 Years Ago
      Yes. That is expensive.
      But this car will look crazy-awesome next to the rest of the cars on Chinese streets.
        • 3 Years Ago
        True that, tired seeing all those Passats and Audi sedans in China, they can use more coupes on the street.
      • 3 Years Ago
      It translates into "Branch the steps to Luo" Luo - This allegorically refers to the union of Heaven and Earth and specifically to the electro magnetic field that holds all matter together.

      In other words the car is a way to Luo. The language does not directly translate - few languages are as direct as English...

      It makes the Camaro very desireable indeed....

      You guys need a better search engine...

      I am a Celt and I found this in one try..
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