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Translogic hits the streets in a Tango EV – Click above to watch video after the jump

The Tango electric vehicle looks like a cross between a G-Wiz and Goldmember's Corbin Sparrow. However, it has a hidden talent buried underneath its tandem seating configuration: It's quick – very quick. What does that mean exactly? Bradley Hasemeyer and the AOL Translogic crew decided to trek to Spokane, Washington and talk to the man behind the machine, to find out.

The brainchild of Rick Woodbury, the Tango EV is an electric two-passenger car capable of sub-four-second 0-60 mile per hour bursts. At just 39-inches wide, the Tango is narrower than a Honda Goldwing motorcycle. It's no cream-puff piece of plastic, either. Woodbury says you ought to be quite safe behind the wheel of the Tango thanks to its FIA-certified roll-cage and reinforced doors.

It's a tire-smoking electric two-door that looks as odd as it does fun. Whir past the jump to watch Translogic take the Tango EV for a spin.

[Source: Translogic]


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  • 29 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      That is the best they could do on styling? Really?

      Horrible. Even if the vehicle works in it's very limited role, it is ugly as sin.
      • 3 Years Ago
      I love the concept, but hate the design. They should have built it around off the shelf headlights and tailights, something from a chevy or ford would have saved him some money.

      Gotta say the concept wins out in this case. I'd drive something like that if the price was more practical.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Pretty sure those are off the shelf lights. Taillights are definitely Isuzu Rodeo units and while I can't place the headlights with as much certainty I'm going to guess they're Olds Alero units. I've seen them on a lot of RVs, at least, and those always use off the shelf components.
        • 3 Years Ago
        I believe they used stock taillights.

        The steering column on the one I drove was right out of a Pontiac. Even the key fob was a GM one.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Cant quite qet over the fact its got minivan headlamps and isuzu rodeo taillamps
        • 3 Years Ago
        When you have limited R&D budget, you have to pick and choose your battles.

        Sure it doesn't look great, but the decision likely allowed them to spend more elsewhere.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Please use some of that grant money (assuming there is grant money) to hire a designer! The engineering of this lil guy sounds good... make it look the part.
      • 3 Years Ago
      As much as i appreciate EV's and their tremendous potential, I must say, God that thing looks aweful! I don't care if it does 0-60 in -6 seconds and i think id be as uncomfortable as i was during my MRI scan. I have some EV concepts of my own you can see at pategi.blogspot.com
        • 3 Years Ago
        you might have gotten me to look at your website and check out your ideas if you weren't dogging this so hard
      • 3 Years Ago
      these would help cities like LA and NYC with traffic.
        • 3 Years Ago
        They can be parked perpendicular to the curb, also.
        • 3 Years Ago
        It might help in the cities, but only if they come up with a viable way and cost effective one for apartment dwellers to charge them.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Never, ever, park your Tango next to a frat house. You've been warned.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Isn't California the only state to allow lane splitting? And then (technically) only when traffic is backed up? Unless other states start allowing that, as well as allowing cars to drive two-up in a lane like motorcycles can, then this won't help congestion issues too much.

      I wonder if the reason it performed as well as it did in the lane-change manuever is because its narrow width allowed to need a lot smaller steer inputs to get around the cones. Kind of like how an autocross course feels like a bigger track to a gokart. Not that it is an invalid approach at all, you use the strengths you have to their best advange...
      • 3 Years Ago
      That is quick, but what happens when you go around a corner? This might not be as easy to put back on its wheels as a Reliant Robin...
        • 3 Years Ago
        Hmm. I didn't know the shifting wasn't gears. It's a reconfiguration of the motor controller at that speed. Either way it's loud and has a clunk.

        Another note on the seats, you will see in the quick "skin off" picture in the video that the person in back has their knees alongside the front seat. This means there is more space between the seat (or your shoulder) and the side than you think, which means for some people contorting into the back seat is an option. Not for me though.
        • 3 Years Ago
        I realize that the center of gravity is far lower than a normal car's, but the track is just so narrow.

        I'm sure its wonderful for normal driving and impressive at the drag strip, but you couldn't convince me to take this around a track, especially with all of the sulfuric acid onboard...
        • 3 Years Ago
        You can't tip it over. I tried. A friend owns one and he let 3 of us grown men try to tip it over by pushing on it, you can't even get particularly close.

        Around corners it doesn't lean either.

        It has hundreds if not thousands of pounds of lead acid batteries at the bottom (below the axle centerline actually!), that keeps it upright.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ joeyo387

        I'd venture to say that 85%-90% of this vehicles weight is below your hips.

        No way would this thing flip easily with thousands of pounds (literally) of batteries.
        • 3 Years Ago
        I said hundreds if not thousands, thank you very much.

        You get in the back seat by sliding the front seat forward. The seats are on a rail system, you can slide either of the seats all the way back, including right off the rails if you have the back door open. So you slide the front seat forward (not tilt it, slide it) and then get behind it. To be honest, it's a huge pain.

        It's not all that practical. In theory you're supposed to wear a helmet too because it's not crash tested (it's actually a kit car), but this is of course not done and I can't imagine the cops would enforce it either. The seats are good though, nice racing-style buckets.

        While I'm slagging it, I'd also mention the reason it's so fast to 60 is because it has a two-speed gearbox, and it the shift is rough and has a loud clunk.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ BoxerFanatic

        The batteries are 12 pounds shy of 1,000 pounds. Did you not watch the video? Watch the whole video first, then flip to about 2:45. You sit ONTOP of the batteries.

        Lead acid batteries are VERY heavy, and lead is a VERY heavy metal.
        • 3 Years Ago
        spin cycle - Tell us, how do you get into the back seat?
      • 3 Years Ago
      Man, this thing would be a RIOT to have around here in DC. Fast as stink to get in and out of holes in traffic and it would be insanely easy to park. It definitely needs more modern batteries and regenerative braking though in order to be more viable.

      I can see this catching on some day.

      • 3 Years Ago
      The revolutionary idea here is the form factor - narrow enough that two cars could fit in each lane. If that idea reached mass adoption we could significantly reduce traffic problems. We could almost double the space for cars on the road, with nothing more than changing some laws and maybe repainting the lines.

      If it was coupled with Google's automated driving system commuting could become an entirely different experience. I could see a future where we trust our car to automatically drive our children to soccer practice itself. Where maybe each person in the family including children have their own car (you should be able to fit several into a regular garage). Where there are lanes that favor these 1/2 lane cars, with maybe even an inductive charging loop under the pavement so we're not lugging around these heavy batteries. Where we consider commuting as something different from driving, because driving is reserved for places and times when it's really fun to drive.

      Otherwise, it's old technology - lead acid batteries, DC propulsion (I believe that means no regen braking), heavy weight at over 3,000 pounds. I guess the problem is the cost.

      Oh, and I want to know how you get into the backseat without being a contortionist!
        • 3 Years Ago
        You've been watching the Jetsons again haven't you.
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