• Mar 17, 2011
Toyota has been granted the ability to gather financial data on 81 plaintiffs filing lawsuits against the automaker over losses associated with claims of unintended acceleration. According to The Salt Lake Tribune, two private judges ruled that the automaker could, in fact, secure information from banks, lending and insurance institutions. Lawyers working for Toyota have argued that since the cases deal directly with the value of the plaintiffs' vehicles, the company is entitled to know just how much the cars were worth to begin with. In fact, most of the information has already been accumulated by Toyota, and the plaintiff's privacy is protected by a special court order.
Lawyers representing the plaintiffs, meanwhile, say that the financial information is irrelevant and "highly personal." Furthermore, there's some concern that private information like social security numbers and health history may be needlessly revealed during court proceedings. That argument apparently didn't stand up in front of the court.

[Source: The Salt Lake Tribune]


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  • 20 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      well he was an idiot...but dint jump to the immediate conclusion that those financially strapped obviously didnt have any issues at all..........
      • 3 Years Ago
      Toyota should have to turn over all their records of complaints by customers, regrading past problems that were hid from the public.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @art in motion, the others have, the others didn't lie and deceive the public. The others had recalls while Toyota lied, lied, lied, lied and lied some more.
        • 3 Years Ago
        If Toyota should then all automakers should. On that note, how many complaints are legitimate? What do you do with the complaints of the steering wheel shaking, only to find out the owner had never balanced or rotated their tires? Or irresponsible owners not changing the oil in their cars and complaining about their car breaking down?

        I feel that word-of-mouth complaints that you hear day to day make up a fair chunk of official complaints anyway.
        • 3 Years Ago
        why should all automakers have to, they aren't being sued?
      • 3 Years Ago
      I whole heartly agree with you.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Seems like a sneaky way to see if anyone is trying to scam them in the process.....by seeing if they're well underwater on mortgages, in debt to everyone, etc. like that genius who tried and failed to pull off a UA stunt a while back.

      Should at least clear out the bogus claims from any legit ones you would hope.
      • 3 Years Ago
      They will find they are all mentally unstable and irresponsible with their finances. Just like every tool that is dumb enough to buy a Toyota.
        • 3 Years Ago
        I drive a Toyota Prius.
      • 3 Years Ago
      It's called discovery and it makes sense to give that right to Toyota as the cause of these crashes have been far from obvious according to the multiple studies done.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Considering the whole fiasco ended up being tied to floormats and operator error, no doubt more than a few of these plaintiffs are sticking to their imaginary stories about their cars running away. This should help the court reveal the truth behind the doubtless scammers in this group who rightfully deserve nothing for their troubles. That way those in legitimate need of compensation will have more time and attention.
      • 3 Years Ago
      What does a plaintiffs financial records have to do with the vehicles value.... hasn't Toyota ever heard of a thing called Kelly Blue Book?
        • 3 Years Ago
        The lawyers for Toyotal are quoted in the ariticle as saying it is to determine what the car is worth.
        • 3 Years Ago
        In my opinion, KBB gives consumers misleading ideas about what their cars are worth. KBB doesn't take into account how certain cars are selling at auction, or how fuel prices are affecting what people are willing to pay for certain cars.
      • 3 Years Ago
      good move Toyota, beat them at their own game, and uncover these unscrupulous individuals.
      • 3 Years Ago
      That right toyota!!! Grab that sword and start swinging... Ruck a you dolphin and a ruck a you whale..lol
      • 3 Years Ago
      What is a private judge? I am unaware of that term. Is one similar to assistant judges who are are appointed to help the trial judges. If so, then their decisions are subject to immediate review, and reversal.
      This sounds more like damages discovery, and nothing more. It would be simply saying "we need to see what you make, what your debt, assets are to evaluate exactly the amount of damages that may be assessed."
      This allows the insurance company and Toyota how much to offer in settlement, or how much to have in reserve if there is a judgment against them.
      To go further and say Toyota has won a victory is plain and simple BS. This is a ruling in discovery, no matter how Toyota plays it out in public. On the other side, by putting it out to the public, Toyota might find itself tied up by a gag order.
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