• Mar 17, 2011
Chip Ganassi's underground test track – Click above to watch video after the jump

Floyd Ganassi Jr, better known as Chip, is a fixture in the motorsports industry. He currently operates vehicles that run IndyCar, NASCAR and Grand-Am races. That requires knowledge of a variety of racing vehicles, and Ganassi has a unique way to test his vehicles – in a mile-long tunnel built into a Pennsylvania hill.

Opened in 1940, the Laurel Hill Tunnel was originally intended to be a railway tunnel before becoming a part of the local turnpike. Ganassi has since turned the tunnel into his own test track. Vehicles run down the straight roadway, hit a pre-determined speed and then coast while aerodynamic forces are measured. At each end of the tunnel sits a turntable so that the vehicle being tested can quickly be rotated and sent back in the other direction.

A hiker walking by the tunnel managed to capture beautiful noises emanating from within, and you can listen in by clicking past the jump. We also recommend heading over to Racecar-Engineering for a detailed look at what's going on underneath this hill in Pennsylvania.

[Source: Racecar-Engineering.com via Inside Line]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 25 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      OK that's freakin awesome.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Two thumbs up to Chip. Roger must have wondered how Chip did some thing he always seems to be able to do. Thanks AutoBlog, Good job to the wanderer.
      • 3 Years Ago
      After checking it out, boy are there going to be some huge redasses at nascar. Good job Chip, and another two thumbs up. Superb!
      • 3 Years Ago
      Test track? It seems to me it's more of a wind tunnel, with aerodynamic force measuring and all that.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Even it it's just a straight run, it's still a track used for testing...
        • 3 Years Ago
        Or the "wind" could come from say the car driving down the length of the 1 mile tunnel, the same way a car would create aerodynamic downforce on a track. Oh wait, is this closed tunnel a vacuum?
        • 3 Years Ago
        Yeah, that wind in the closed tube must be incredible! It must be like a Hurrican! Oh wait, it's a closed tube! Oops...
      • 3 Years Ago
      That is so cool. Chip has own skunkworks.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Reminds me of southparks nascar skid. now driving down the straight tunnel then the rotation and back the straight..and a rotation and along the straight..aso...

      well of course for aerodynamic measurements this is useful and its james bond like ;)
      • 3 Years Ago
      thats cool ? o useful ?
      • 3 Years Ago
      Pretty Cool.

      Many PA'ers have known about its existence for a few years. Last time I tried to venture close the State Police were actively looking to keep people out of the area. They were cool about it but it was clear that they were on orders to keep people far away.

      There are a variety of sections of the PA Turnpike that have been moved over the years. The old sections were simply abandoned and are being re-purposed. The national guard uses some for storage, the State Police did convert one into a rifle range, and multiple movies have been filmed along it (The Road for example).
      • 3 Years Ago
      Thats awesome
      • 3 Years Ago
      Just imagine the noise from inside the car...

      However, wouldn't it suck to crash in the tunnel and be roasted with no means of escape?
      • 3 Years Ago
      Ganassi Skunk Works
      • 3 Years Ago
      awesome. character like this makes me happy to be a car enthusiast.
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