• Mar 16, 2011
Thanks to the Environmental Protection Agency, new car buyers always have the ability to read fuel economy numbers on the window sticker of any car on the lot. But if you're looking at a used vehicle, the same efficiency info isn't always readily available.

Consumer Reports reports that the EPA has changed that little problem by posting the fuel efficiency information of used vehicles on its fueleconomy.gov website. These aren't new fuel economy numbers, but the EPA did apply the updated fuel economy logic that was instituted in 2008. So if your original 1995 Honda Civic was once quoted at 40 miles per gallon, the new fuel economy number is 33 mpg. The EPA is tracking fuel economy dating back to 1984, too, so car buyers can go back before many Autoblog readers were even born.

The EPA is hoping that anyone selling a vehicle will use the tool as well. Dealers, for example, can print up the window sticker and place it on the window of the vehicle being sold, giving the "sold as is, no warranty" caveat some competition on the passenger-side window.

[Source: Consumer Reports]


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  • 18 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      My '95 Civic CX got 48 mpg on the highway @ 70mph with the A/C on! Take that, Prius/Insight!
      • 3 Years Ago
      They rated my car at 23 and I get 35 combined. Nice try EPA
      • 3 Years Ago
      I hope this is tied to VIN so dealers don't intentionally or inadvertently pick a different trim's fuel efficiency to be represented.
      • 3 Years Ago
      "The EPA is tracking fuel economy dating back to 1984, too, so car buyers can go back before many Autoblog readers were even born."

      Thanks for making me feel old Autoblog ):
      (1979 here)
      • 3 Years Ago
      QR Codes every.where now i see
      • 3 Years Ago
      Interesting looking at that mileage. All the ricers kids at TOV are always wanting Honda to return to their old ways in the 1990s. Look at that low mileage on the Civic. Why would they want to return to that?
        • 3 Years Ago
        That sticker in the pic isn't even remotely similar to what people actually get in those cars. A Canadian CX with the 16 valve 1.5 (American's got an 8-valve in the CX, don't know which model got the 16 valve 1.5) will get 46-49 mpg on the highway, an HX is even better.

        I've never liked EPA estimates because they are not consistent. My old Civic got 49 mpg, way above the EPA estimate, but my Protege gets about 1 mpg above the estimate.
        • 3 Years Ago
        I hear that. Gen 8 base gets like 1 more MPG combined, but it's a Volvo compared to the 95.
        • 3 Years Ago
        no kidding, the new civics are volvo in comparsion. Those old 90s Civics had the same crash rating as an aluminum can.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Can't tag my cars! 82 and 83 here.
      • 3 Years Ago
      It never ceases to amaze me how government burocracies will come up with new and inventive way of wasting our hard earned money. These useless burocrats are the new French aristocracy and we need a guillotine...
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'm calling bull on some of you people's claims for the mileage you got in those old Hondas. Maybe if you were going down hill with a tail wind all the time.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Cool, but not terribly useful. Used cars vary so much due to maintenance, etc that these numbers probably aren't even close to reliable (as stated in the small print).

      I still find it hard to believe in this day and age people don't research this stuff themselves anyway.
      • 3 Years Ago
      I like this simply because it gives us some perspective as to how these older cars compare to the newer ones. It won't be 100% accurate as mentioned because cars deteriorate with time, but at least it gives us a general idea.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Oh, that Civic CX had 150,000 miles and wider tires (205) than stock, too.
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