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Nissan Leaf battery plant groundbreaking – Click above for high-res image gallery

Renault's chief executive officer, Carlos Ghosn, is under intense scrutiny after the automaker admitted to wrongfully firing three of its executives on suspicions of industrial espionage. France's Socialist Party boss, Martine Aubry, has told France Info radio that Ghosn should ultimately take responsibility for this humiliating affair, saying that:
When an employee makes a mistake in a company, he does not have to apologize – he is out.
Francois Baroin, a spokesman for the French government, told LCI television that Renault should:
Take all the consequences ... from the incredible amateurism, and the indignity, and the attack against these men.
On Monday, Renault apologized for the debacle. That same day, Carlos Ghosn gave up his bonus and refused to accept the resignation of second-in-command, Patrick Pelata, who had vowed to fall on his sword if it turned out Renault was wrong to fire the three execs originally accused of industrial espionage. Ghosn told TF1 television that he has refused Pelata's resignation because he "did not want to add one crisis to another." Bertrand Rochette, one of the three men wrongly accused, released a statement saying that he had not been contacted by Ghosn.

Renault is pledging to overhaul its corporate governance and will, from here on out, have its security division report directly to the automaker's executive committee, but will that be enough to put an end to this fiasco? We shall see.


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Photos by Sebastian Blanco / Copyright ©2010 AOL

[Source: Reuters, Automotive News – sub. req.]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 7 Comments
      • 1 Month Ago
      Hate to say it, but i wouldn't mind seeing Ghosn go.

      He did turn the company around, but Nissan's reliability instantly went in the dumpster the following year after he took the helm.

      Nissan used to be great because even though they had funky designs, at least they were as reliable as Hondas and Toyotas... sometimes they were even priced lower too.
        • 1 Month Ago
        I surely agree with you at that point.

        Would be nice if we could have our cake ( oldschool Nissan reliability ) and eat it too ( dedication to EV's )
        • 1 Month Ago
        I would prefer to see him stay given his commitment to EV's which is higher than most other automaker CEOs.

        The risk is a new CEO could steer the company away from EV's.
      • 1 Month Ago
      Sounds like a nasty, cantankerous sitchee-aitchen for these clowns. Too bad, too bad, Babylon the Great has fallen. Too bad.

      Sorry ta have ta break it to you, but this is one one of too many problems coming up to mention on this forum. It's too big and too large, and much too ominous. Worldwide.

      Huge. Big. And large. Use yer imagination. I'll bet you can figure it out. But you have to try. More than normal trying.
      • 1 Month Ago
      I still don't subscribe to the idea that the chief is responsible for all the stupid things his workers do. it's a mindless culture. things are not made better by Ghosn resigning. it was apparently the bad man who is ex 'intelligence' who caused it all. who knew those people had poor ethics..

      but if they don't apologize to the 3 fired, that's really bad form.
        • 1 Month Ago
        I agree 100%. I believe they have already apologized, at least in public where it counts most. Also I read that they have offered to re-instate their jobs, I guess we will wait to see if anyone takes them up on this.

        People who run companies have to make major decisions all the time, based on reports from their employees. They trust this information to be accurate. One of the worst things that can happen is when employees "doctor" the information because they think it will make their boss happy. Running a business on rosy information is a recipe for disaster.
      • 1 Month Ago
      I don't know where you take the idea from, that Nissan was equal to Toyota / Honda in quality.

      As far as I know, Nissan was always ok-quality, with some better and some worse models (Titan..).